commodities

Chryste D. Best recently was named one of the top 300 women in global Health. Best establishes the processes, procedures, and controls to ensure that all products procured and supplied by the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) meet appropriate quality standards.

We spoke with MSH’s Chryste D. Best, BS, product quality assurance manager, The Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM), about her selection as one of the top 300 women leaders in global health by the Global Health Programme of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. Best provides innovative quality assurance oversight for the global procurement of medicines and commodities by MSH and partners.

{Photo credit: C. Gilmartin/MSH}Photo credit: C. Gilmartin/MSH

For five years, the USAID-funded, MSH-led Leadership, Management and Sustainability project in Haiti (LMS/Haiti) worked with the Ministry of Health and Population (MSPP) and local NGOs to ensure a steady supply of family planning commodities to nearly 300 facilities throughout the country amid bone-rattling roads, surging rivers, and rocky footpaths.

Said Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP, at the project’s closing ceremony April 14:

It is with real pride and great emotion that I salute LMS/Haiti.

LMS/Haiti’s greatest success, as everyone present can attest, was to guarantee the availability of family planning commodities at all times to ministry sites, with zero stock-out.

[ Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP.] {Photo: MSH staff} Dr. Georges Dubuche, General Director of the MSPP.Photo: MSH staff

Esther manages commodity supplies with meticulous record keeping {Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Y. Otieno/MSH.

This is the advice that Esther Wahome, a registered community health nurse in a Kenyan health facility, gives to her clients when they come to the tuberculosis (TB) clinic. Within a short time, Esther dispenses the drugs to the patient, provides health care advice and updates her records.

Esther’s TB clinic clients are usually referred to Kayole II sub-district hospital from Toto Bora and other smaller health care centers. Kayole II, located on the outskirts of Nairobi, provides free health services and receives nearly 300 outpatients each day.

During a routine supervisory visit conducted by the USAID-funded, MSH-led, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) Program, Esther, a mother of two, spoke about her work at the Kayole II TB Clinic, which she has been running for the last three months.

“I like serving in the TB clinic because I get to see patients who are weak regain their strength. Sometimes the patients come in when they are so weak and close to skin and bones that at times I wonder where to inject them. Seeing patients thrive fulfills me and is my joy,” says a smiling Esther.

Senegal {Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.}Photo credit: Galdos/MSH.

Crossposted on Maternal Health Taskforce's mhtfblog as part of the Maternal Health Commodities Blog Series.

Despite a decade of significant progress reducing maternal mortality rates, very few countries are on target to meet Millennium Development Goal of reducing the maternal mortality ratio by three-quarters by 2015.

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