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This framework seeks to outline a national strategy for the development of pharmaceutical HR in the public and private sectors in Afghanistan to produce a stronger pharmaceutical system that responds to the population’s needs. In particular, the framework serves as a reference document for the Human Resources for Health plan and the HR section of the National Medicines Policy of the MoPH.

This document aims to present a concept for the establishment of an independent NMHRA in the country, through which the regulatory activities of various MoPH authorities are coordinated and incorporated so that it is ensured that medical products are of a better quality and that the medicines consumed in the country are safe.

The National Medicine Board was established in 2003 and then it was promoted to the National Medicines & Food Board (NMFB) in 2009. According to the Medicine Law (2008), the Board is the highest decision making entity on issues related to pharmaceuticals. Upon its expansion in 2009, the Board’s mandate was extended to include foodstuff.

Each year the world loses 300,000 women and more than 2 million newborns to preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Millions of mothers in low-resource settings miss out on proper antenatal care, give birth without a skilled attendant, and don’t receive postpartum care for themselves or their babies.

The National Medicine and Food Board (NMFB) was established in 2009, as an advisory board to the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) to advise, coordinate, supervise, and accelerate medicines and food-related activities . . . “to ensure the safety and quality of food products and prevent their unnecessary and unsafe manufacture, importation, distribution, sale, and use”.

Employee satisfaction refers to the employee’s sense of well-being within his or her work environment. It is the result of a combination of extrinsic rewards, such as remuneration and benefits, and intrinsic rewards, such as respect and appreciation.

Studies have shown that the role of a midwife before, during and after delivery can play a crucial role in preventing cross-infection between mother and baby. Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT) remains a serious threat, particularly with Zika and HIV viruses. Midwives have the power to change that. 

Over half a billion people have died in epidemics over the last century and most experts agree another epidemic is not a matter of if, but a matter of when. Are you ready? This one page summary of Ready Together was presented at the 2017 Conference on Epidemic Preparedness held at Harvard Medical School.  

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to help build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security as a national and global priority. Find out more about the GHSA, visit: https://www.ghsagenda.org/ 

In order to fight against future epidemics, the world must take action to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease outbreaks.   

Once an outbreak becomes an epidemic, the costs - both human and financial - on health systems are extensive and debilitating. 

The list of 10 Core tests in each country includes six testing methods selected according to the International Health Regulations' immediately notifiable list and the WHO Top Ten Causes of Death in low-income countries. 

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to help build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security as a national and global priority. Find out more about the GHSA Action Packages, visit: https://www.ghsagenda.org/ 

Between May and July of 2015, South Korea experienced an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, that lead to 38 deaths and seriously affected the country's economy. 

In his new book, 'The End of Epidemics: The Looming Threat to Humanity and How to Stop It,' Dr. Johnathan D. Quick, a Harvard Medical School faculty member and Chair of the Global Health Council, examines the eradication of smallpox and devastating effects of influenza, AIDS, SARS, and Ebola.

Burkina Faso: Amid times of political crisis, civil society advocates call for increased invesment in women's and children's health Kenya: Women's and children's health in a devolved state: Advocates tackle crippling health worker shortages through budget advocacy

Access to safe and effective family planning is a fundamental human right, essential for achieving gender equality, eliminating extreme poverty, and reducing maternal and child deaths.

The use of rapid and inexpensive nonlaboratory-based screening tests for drug quality assessments is recommended as a component of a drug quality assurance program in poor resource settings. We have established routine Minilab test procedures to screen product quality and a proficiency testing program to determine the competency of the inspectors and reliability of results. Samples for the proficiency testing were prepared by pulverizing a standard reference tablet of the appropriate drug and making serial dilutions with starch to obtain concentrations of 0, 40, and 100%. The samples, which were labeled only with the drug name and an identifying letter, were given to inspectors for quality screening using Minilab procedures. In round 1 of the proficiency test, only 3 of 28 substandard samples were correctly identified. Round 2 of the proficiency test, which was administered after a performance qualification test for the analytical method, showed much improvement: 19 of 27 substandard drugs were correctly identified, while 5 out of 9 inspectors made the correct inference on the quality of 45 samples. However, in both rounds, 2 inspectors failed to identify substandard samples, indicating that their technical competencies need to be improved for the reliability of the results. Although the thin-layer chromatography screening methods provide a rapid means for drug quality assessment, they need to be put in the hands of competent users. The inclusion of a proficiency test in the screening program provides a measure of determining competency of the personnel and reliability of the results.

This paper explores HIV patients’ adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited contexts in Uganda and Ethiopia, where ART is provided free of charge. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 79 patients, 17 peer counselors, and 22 providers in ART facilities in urban and rural areas of Ethiopia and Uganda. To grant patients a fair choice to successfully adhere to ART, transport costs to ART facilities need to be reduced. This implies providing patients with drugs for longer periods of time and arranging for better laboratory services, thus not necessitating frequent revisits. Services ought to be brought closer to patients and peripheral, community-based healthworkers used for drug distribution. There is a need for training providers and peer counselors, in communication skills and adherence counseling.

To achieve a high quality global infrastructure for pharmacy, the educational system should be mapped to the required competencies of pharmacists to provide the relevant pharmaceutical services for meeting the health needs in any given country context. While no one national model may be appropriate for all systems, there are significant global health and labor and market drivers which suggest that a competency-based approach is sensible and sustainable for workforce development.

Pharmacists' roles are evolving from that of compounders and dispensers of medicines to that of experts on medicines within multidisciplinary health care teams. In the developing country context, the pharmacy is often the most accessible or even the sole point of access to health care advice and services. Because of their knowledge of medicines and clinical therapeutics, pharmacists are suitably placed for task shifting in health care and could be further trained to undertake functions such as clinical management and laboratory diagnostics. Indeed, pharmacists have been shown to be willing, competent, and cost-effective providers of what the professional literature calls "pharmaceutical care interventions"; however, internationally, there is an underuse of pharmacists for patient care and public health efforts. A coordinated and multifaceted effort to advance workforce planning, training and education is needed in order to prepare an adequate number of well-trained pharmacists for such roles. Acknowledging that health care needs can vary across geography and culture, an international group of key stakeholders in pharmacy education and global health has reached unanimous agreement that pharmacy education must be quality-driven and directed towards societal health care needs, the services required to meet those needs, the competences necessary to provide these services and the education needed to ensure those competences. Using that framework, this commentary describes the Pharmacy Education Taskforce of the World Health Organization, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the International Pharmaceutical Federation Global Pharmacy and the Education Action Plan 2008–2010, including the foundation, domains, objectives and outcome measures, and includes several examples of current activities within this scope.

With increasing numbers of people worldwide on antiretroviral drugs, the need for improved and sustained global drug safety monitoring or pharmacovigilance is critical. Pharmacovigilance includes monitoring for substandard products, diversion, inappropriate use, and toxicity and is an essential component of safe and effective drug usage. The Forum for Collaborative HIV Research was asked to use its neutral setting for key stakeholders from the UN and government agencies, donors, industry, academia, multilateral organizations, and implementers to discuss the creation of a sustainable global pharmacovigilance system for antiretrovirals (ARVs). Important but contrasting priorities and values among stakeholders—all of whom are dedicated to establishing global pharmacovigilance—were identified as barriers to progress. Recognition, understanding, and respect for these contrasts is a pathway for increased collaboration and cooperation that will then lead to a sustainable system involving all stakeholders including industry and experienced regulatory agencies.

The Government of Cameroon and its partners have made major investments in the last decade in prevention, treatment, and care of HIV-infected patients. However, unmet need for antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive pregnant women remains high at 66%. Critical to satisfying this need is ensuring adequate availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) commodities for rollout of new Option B+ guidelines. This study examines options for improving the supply and availability of these commodities. Supply chain operational data was collected in July 2014 from central (CENAME) and 4 regional warehouses (CAPRs); 10 district stores; and 30 service delivery points (SDPs), including ART and PMTCT sites. The study also included seven central private-sector logistics firms. In addition, SC cost data was obtained from CENAME and CAPRs financial statements. Data collected served for analysis of three options to improve effectiveness of delivering PMTCT commodities. Asset utilization within the cost recovery system ranged between 73% and 89% while inventory turnover was at 1.5. Therefore, a reliable supply of medicines to SDPs is ensured. However, for PMTCT and ART commodities, distribution to the SDPs was unreliable (in 2013, 40% of prescriptions remained unfilled). Meanwhile, results of the options analysis indicated that the model of CAPRs delivering PMTCT commodities to SDPs was the most desirable. Although the distance traveled was higher, the need for network storage space was minimal. Moreover, its total cost and human resource requirements were more favorable. As a result of disseminating the findings, the Ministry of Health adopted Option 2.

In 2014, the budget for high cost drugs in the Dominican Republic was USD 107 million, accounting for 51% of the Ministry of Health (MoH) budget for medicines. Resources allocated for the 2015 budget were USD 49 million, leaving a shortfall of USD 62 million. The MoH requested technical assistance from the USAID-funded SIAPS project to conduct an evidence based analysis of the 98 products included in the list.

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