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Building Success is a series of guides offering practical, concrete, and innovative approaches that have proven effective in strengthening the response to HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis in Nigeria. Each of the four guides can stand alone, but they will be most effective if used as components of an integrated package.

The Ukrainian Ministry of Health (UMoH), working with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in support of the US Agency for International Development’s (USAID) SAFEMed project, is seeking information on how an interested contractor could develop and implement a national medicine verification (serialization) practice.

The Ukrainian Ministry of Health, working with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in support of the US Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Safe, Affordable, and Effective Medicines for Ukrainians (SAFEMed) project, is seeking information on how an interested contractor could develop and implement a national medicine verification (serialization) practice.

In most countries, tuberculosis (TB) services are decentralized up to the most peripheral health facilities and often into the community. On the other hand, HIV/AIDS services are generally much more centralized because scale-up of services, especially of antiretroviral therapy (ART), started only quite recently.

We build strong health systems—systems that offer every individual access to high-quality, affordable health services. Systems that can stop an epidemic in its tracks. Systems that can withstand the shocks of an economic meltdown or a conflict.

The objective of this study was to describe the conceptual and implementation approach of selected digital health technologies that were tailored in various resource-constrained countries. Drawing from our multi-year institutional experience in more than 20 high disease-burden countries that aspire to meet the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, we screened internal project documentation on various digital health tools that provide clarity in the conceptual and implementation approach. Taking into account geographic diversity, we provide a descriptive review of five selected case studies from Bangladesh (Asia), Mali (Francophone Africa), Uganda (East Africa), Mozambique (Lusophone Africa), and Namibia (Southern Africa). A key lesson learned is to harness and build on existing governance structures. The use of data for decision-making at all levels needs to be cultivated and sustained through multi-stakeholder partnerships. The next phase of information management development is to build systems for triangulation of data from patients, commodities, geomapping, and other parameters of the pharmaceutical system. A well-defined research agenda must be developed to determine the effectiveness of the country- and regional-level dashboards as an early warning system to mitigate stock-outs and wastage of medicines and commodities.

The overall objective of this baseline study is to help gather or generate information as a point of reference on the health condition of the population living in the project supported health zones, the management and supervision capacity of health services decentralized entities,  the situation and barriers for access to health services, the quality of health services, and health knowledge,

Over six years (2011-2017), the USAID-funded Leadership, Management, and Governance (LMG) Project strengthened health systems to deliver more responsive services to more people.

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. would like to issue amendment no. 1 to Request for Proposal (RFP) – IHSA-2018-001 for the Baseline Study in support of the Integrated Health Services Activity in Benin.

RFP No. IHSA-2018-001 Budget Template

USAID’s Benin Integrated Health Services Activity (IHSA) is issuing request for proposals (RFP) No.

The Abuja Declaration (WHO 2011), which reported on investments in health, noted that funding targets are being missed, both domestically and in terms of international assistance.

The concept of good governance has gained prominence in development programs over the past decade. Good governance in the health sector and other sectors that have an impact on health is recognized as essential to achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

The Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) was implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from June 2015 to June 2018 by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Overseas Strategic Consulting, Ltd. (OSC), under a subcontract via Pathfinder/Evidence to Action.

The Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) was implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from June 2015 to June 2018 by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Overseas Strategic Consulting, Ltd. (OSC), under a subcontract via Pathfinder/Evidence to Action.

The Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus) was implemented in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) from June 2015 to June 2018 by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Overseas Strategic Consulting, Ltd. (OSC), under a subcontract via Pathfinder/Evidence to Action.

In Namibia, Togo, and 10 other countries, MSH pioneered the Electronic Dispensing Tool, a cutting-edge information system that uses the patient as the focal point and captures critical information needed to make decisions about an individual’s drug regimen, as well as stock inventory and aggregate patient statistics. How it's used

GxAlert is a web-based open-source data connectivity application that includes a system for data management designed to work with any diagnostic device that can connect to the internet or a mobile network.

Our objective was to assess the knowledge of health professionals on Xpert MTB/RIF assay and associated factors in detecting TB/TB drug resistance. An institution based cross–sectional study was conducted from April 4 to June 5, 2015, in Addis Ababa, that involved 209 healthcare providers working in TB clinics.The overall magnitude of knowledge of healthcare workers on Xpert was found to be low. Health workers above age 35 years and those who had read the guidelines on Xpert had greater knowledge of Xpert. Distribution of the national guidelines on Xpert and assigning experienced clinicians to TB DOTs clinics are recommended.

From 2006 to 2014, Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), the global procurement and distribution project for the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), distributed over US$1.6 billion worth of antiretroviral drugs and other health commodities, with over US$263 million purchased from local vendors in 14 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. A simple framework was developed and 39 local suppliers from 4 countries were interviewed between 2013 and 2014 to understand how SCMS local sourcing impacted supplier development. SCMS local suppliers reported new contracts with other businesses (77%), new assets acquired (67%), increased access to capital from local lending institutions (75%), offering more products and services (92%), and ability to negotiate better prices from their principals (80%). Additionally, 70% (n=27) of the businesses hired between 1 and 30 new employees after receiving their first SCMS contract and 15% (n=6) hired between 30 and 100 new employees. This study offers preliminary guidance on how bilateral and multilateral agencies could design effective local sourcing programs to create sustainable local markets for selected pharmaceutical products, laboratory, and transport services.

Inadequate health-care provider performance is a major challenge to the delivery of high-quality health care in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Health Care Provider Performance Review (HCPPR) is a comprehensive systematic review of strategies to improve health-care provider performance in LMICs. We screened 216,477 citations and selected 670 reports from 337 studies of 118 strategies. For professional health-care providers (generally, facility-based health workers), the effects were near zero for only implementing a technology-based strategy or only providing printed information. For percentage outcomes, training or supervision alone typically had moderate effects (10·3–15·9 percentage points), whereas combining training and supervision had somewhat larger effects than use of either strategy alone. Group problem solving alone showed large improvements in percentage outcomes (28·0–37·5 percentage points), but, when the strategy definition was broadened to include group problem solving alone or other strategy components, moderate effects were more typical (12·1 percentage points).

Quality of tuberculosis (TB) microscopy diagnosis is not a guarantee despite implementation of external quality assurance (EQA) services in all laboratories of health facilities. Hence, we aimed at evaluating the technical quality and the findings of sputum smear microscopy for acid fast bacilli (AFB) at health centers in Hararge Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Of the total 55 health center laboratories assessed during the study period (July 2014-July 2015), 20 (36.4%) had major technical errors; 13 (23.6%) had 15 false negative results and 17 (30.9%) had 22 false positive results. The quality of AFB smear microscopy reading and smearing was low in most of the laboratories of the health centers. Therefore, it is essential to strength the EQA program through building the capacity of laboratory professionals.

This quasi-experimental study conducted in Afghanistan examines the causal impact of a provincial health governance intervention on the provincial health system’s performance. It compares health system performance indicators between 16 intervention provinces and 18 nonintervention provinces using a difference-in-differences analysis to draw inference. The intervention consisted of governance action planning, implementation of the governance action plan, and self-assessment of governance performance before and after the intervention. The intervention had a statistically and practically significant impact on six indicators.

Ethiopia has a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) and is one of the countries with the highest burden of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This study's purpose was to understand the costs that patients incur in obtaining diagnosis and treatment for MDR-TB. In March 2013, interviews were conducted with 169 MDR-TB patients at three hospitals in Ethiopia to identify the cost to patients and the impact on employment and family income. The average MDR-TB patient incurred a total cost of US$1378, which represented 25 months of a mid-treatment household income of US$54. The impact on the patient's employment and on overall patient and family income was generally catastrophic: 74% of all respondents reported losing their jobs, 66% of patients lost household income, and household income was reduced by 38%. To help cover the costs, 38% of patients sold some type of property, while 7% leased out property and 41% took out loans, any of which could jeopardize their future financial situation even further. Despite services being officially free of charge, most patients incurred catastrophic costs and suffered significant income loss as a result of obtaining diagnosis and treatment for MDR-TB.

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