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The Leadership Development Program Plus (LDP+) is the enhanced version of the Leadership Development Program (LDP) first delivered by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in 2002.

A Conference on Epidemic Preparedness November 13, 2017 The Joseph B. Martin Conference Center I Harvard Medical School

Several recent studies have attempted to measure the prevalence of disrespect and abuse (D&A) of women during childbirth in health facilities. Variations in reported prevalence may be associated with differences in study instruments and data collection methods. This systematic review and comparative analysis of methods aims to aggregate and present lessons learned from published studies that quantified the prevalence of D&A during childbirth.

Emergencies can often directly impact health systems of an affected region or country, especially in resource-constrained areas. Health system recovery following an emergency is a complex and dynamic process. Health system recovery efforts have often been structured around the World Health Organization’s health systems building blocks as demonstrated by the Post-Disaster Needs Assessment. Although this structure is valuable and well known, it can overlook the intricacies of public health systems. We retrospectively examine public health systems recovery, a subset of the larger health system, following the 2010 Haiti earthquake and cholera outbreak, through the lens of the 10 essential public health services. This framework illustrates the comprehensive nature of and helps categorize the activities necessary for a well-functioning public health system and can complement other assessments. Outlining the features of a public health system for recovery in structured manner can also help lay the foundation for sustainable long-term development leading to a more robust and resilient health system.

The objective of this study is to explore selected pharmacies' readiness to serve women seeking emergency contraception (EC). This study used a mystery client (MC) methodology to visit 73 pharmacies in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Findings indicate that more than two-thirds of EC providers were knowledgeable about EC dosage, timeframe, and side effects, and 90% were deemed helpful towards novice EC users. Rare but glaring misconceptions about EC timeframe (20% of providers) and long-term side effects (4% of providers), as well as frequent stock-out (22%) and cost issues highlight priorities for programmatic improvements. As new service delivery strategies are explored to complement the uneven network of health structures in DRC, this study suggests that, given proper training and integration in FP programming, private-sector pharmacies have the potential to meet specific contraceptive needs for women living in Kinshasa.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) knows that community readiness is key to epidemic prevention, detection and early response. Communities are at the frontline of infectious disease outbreaks and despite international progress around global health security, remain extremely vulnerable and under prepared.

The objective of this study was to understand motives for contraceptive implant discontinuation in Luanda and Huambo, Angola. We conducted 45 in-depth interviews and six focus groups amongst former and current contraceptive implant clients and family planning nurses in eight clinics. Motives for discontinuation reflect findings from other studies in similar settings, in particular the influence of adverse side effects and desire for pregnancy as motivating factors. We contextualize these findings in the Angolan setting to tease out the relationship between cultural norms of ideal family size and the perceived role of women in regards to fertility and child-bearing. We suggest that programs enter into dialog with communities to address these concerns, rather than working exclusively on improving service delivery and quality.

The objective of the NSP is to improve network effectiveness to meet their member’s needs and enhance their long-term sustainability. The content of the program includes: membership and benefits, distributed leadership, network governance, financial systems and sustainability, and communications for resource mobilization.

The Pre-service Integration Guide is designed to assist heads of departments and faculty in pre-service health training institutions that train medical, nursing, pharmacy, laboratory and other allied health professionals to successfully introduce practical and action-oriented leadership and management modules into pre-service curricula for their students.

This guide was developed as an abbreviated companion to the longer Management Sciences for Health publication Leaders Who Govern, with two main goals: To facilitate finding practical information about specific aspects of good governance

FinMAT helps managers assess their organizations’ financial management capacity, identify areas for improvement, make specific action plans to address shortcomings, and monitor for improvement The heart of FinMAT is an instrument for collecting and summarizing technical information about an organization’s financial management systems and practices.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world’s most pressing and urgent global health threats —one that could erode gains against tuberculosis (TB), malaria, HIV/AIDS, and many other infectious diseases. While AMR has emerged as a critical issue at the global level, current efforts to address AMR are insufficient to curb its spread.

In Gavi-eligible countries partnerships are dynamic networks of immunization actors who work together to support all stages and aspects of Gavi support. This paper describes a conceptual framework--the partnership framework--and analytic approach for evaluating the perceptions of partnerships’ value as well as the results from an application to one case in Uganda. We used a mixed-methods case study design embedded in the Gavi Full Country Evaluations to test the partnership framework on Uganda’s human papillomavirus vaccine application partnership. The partnership was not perceived to have increased the efficiency of the process, perhaps as a result of unclear or absent guidelines around roles and responsibilities. We concluded that the health and functioning of global health partnerships can be evaluated using the framework and approach presented here. Network theory and methods added value to the conceptual and analytic processes, and we recommend applying this approach to other global health partnerships to ensure that they are meeting the complex challenges they were designed to address.

Kobe Refugee camp hosts roughly 39,000 refugees displaced from Somalia during the 2011–2012 Horn of Africa Crisis. Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) issues, as well as the greater issues of health and well-being for adolescents displaced from this crisis, remain largely unknown and neglected. In 2013, the Women’s Refugee Commission, Johns Hopkins University, and International Medical Corps in Ethiopia implemented qualitative and quantitative research to explore the factors and risks that impact the health of very young adolescents (VYAs), those 10–14 years of age, in this setting. This research identified several factors that were found to influence the health and well-being of VYAs in Kobe refugee camp, including newfound access to education and security, combined with gender divisions and parental communication around early SRH and puberty that remained intact from traditional Somali culture. Girls were found to face an additional risk of child marriage and early pregnancy since displacement, which significantly limited their ability to access education and achieve future aspirations.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when disease-causing pathogens are able to withstand the killing or suppressing power of antimicrobial medicines. This phenomenon increases the global burden of infectious diseases and strains health systems. Parts 1 and 2 of the online course are offered at the Global Health Learning Center. Part 1

In February and March 2016, a team of MSH staff and consultants collaborated with the MOHS,UNICEF/Sierra Leone, and other stakeholders to collect data for piloting the methodology and tool.MSH staff conducted interviews and collected data at all levels of the health system, including visitsto health facilities in two districts where facility staff, CHW supervisors, and CHWs were interviewed.MSH st

MSH designed and piloted this methodology and tool in Malawi and Sierra Leone, countries that were selected given the important role that community health workers play within each of the countries' health systems.

We interviewed 273 HIV-infected adolescents receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from three hospitals in Addis Ababa. The level of self-reported ART adherence among HIV-infected adolescents at the three hospitals was below the recommended threshold. Though earlier presentation of adolescents to care should be encouraged, more targeted adherence support should be planned for those who present at an early stage of their illness.

Bedaquiline (BDQ) has been recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) since 2013, but experience using the drug in high-burden, lower-income countries is limited and case studies are needed. Swaziland started using BDQ under national TB programme conditions in 2015 in four pilot sites. As of 1 December 2016, 93 patients had been initiated on BDQ, i.e., 19% of MDR-TB patients treated in the country. Swaziland has developed a systematic and efficient model for BDQ introduction in collaboration with several partners. This model is also being used to introduce other innovations and can serve as an example for other countries facing similar challenges.

The UN adoption of the SDGs in 2015 signaled a strong commitment of member countries to the expanded access to essential health service agenda and definitively recognized the critical role of medicines in achieving UHC.

The USAID Mikolo Project, in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Youth and Sports, established aYouth Peer Educators (YPE) initiative.The initiative aims to improve youth education and awareness on reproductive health and FP in order to increase contraceptive prevalence rates among 15–24 year olds in USAID Mikolo intervention areas.

The USAID Mikolo Project created a new approach to assure, improve, and sustain the quality of community-based health services.This technical brief describes the Mikolo approach and assesses its impact on community health volunteer performance between 2014 and 2016. The USAID Mikolo Project quality assurance / quality improvement approach included ve key activities:

In Madagascar, despite years of efforts to improve maternal health, the maternal mortality ratio remains as high at 487 deaths per 100,000 live births, whereas the average for developing countries is 235. Additionally, only 51% of pregnant women receive four antental care (ANC) visits, which is the recommended number to prevent and manage possible pregnancy complications.

To improve quality of service provision and data accuracy and timeliness, USAID Mikolo is introducing mobile technology to replace paper-based tools used by community health volunteers (CHVs).Working alongside the Ministry of Public Health and other partners, the project has developed a smartphone application that CHVs will use to manage their health services and record-keeping and disseminate inf

This technical brief examines the relative contribution of community health volunteers to reach people, particularly women of reproductive age, and children under the age of ve years, with primary health care services and examines the role of community health volunteers in assuring a continuum of care for pregnant women and young children between 2014 and 2016.

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