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Stakeholder communication is necessary for better coordination and control of pharmaceutical supply management (PSM) activities.

To address the lack of pharmaceutical supply information, a Data and Information Committee (DIC) of the CPDS was established and tasked to develop a Pharmaceutical Logistics Information System (PLIS) to gather the information about pharmaceutical procurement, distribution and consumption in the BPHS/EPHS implementers and health facilities.

The main objective of the survey was to set a baseline for the specific conditions that are intended for improvement through the implementation of revised registration guidelines and procedures, or that SPS Afghanistan interventions are targeting for change.

In 2012, the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Afghanistan Associate Award project—in collaboration with the General Directorate of Pharmaceutical Affairs (GDPA), Grants Contracts Management Unit (GCMU), and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) implementing Partnership Contracts for Health (PCH)—undertook a detailed analysis of outpatient conditions and treatment in a sample o

Afghanistan’s National Medicine and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (NMHRA) uses its Private Pharmacy Outlet Registration (PPOR) database to capture and report on information about private retail pharmacies that are registered with the NMHRA. NMHRA uses the reported information to monitor pharmacies’ registration status or updates, to facilitate coordination among NMHRA d

With technical and financial assistance from SPS, GIHS reviewed and updated/developed its pharmacy assistant curriculum from 2012 to 2015. The final syllabus and curriculum for 21 subjects were printed (500 copies) in high-quality color format and then disseminated through orientation workshops.

This is the overall policy document for Narcotic and Controlled Medicines of Afghanistan pharmaceutical sector. This policy constitutes part of continuous efforts by the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and the stakeholders to ensure accessibility to and prevention of abuse of narcotic and controlled medicines.

To ensure that the inspection of pharmaceutical importers is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of the pharmaceutical importers inspection checklist to guide the inspectors.

To ensure that the inspection of retail pharmacies is carried out with good standard, MOPH initiated the development of the retail pharmacies inspection checklist to guide the inspectors.

To ensure that the inspection of pharmaceutical wholesalers is carried out with good standard, MOPH initiated the development of the wholesalers’ inspection checklist to guide the inspectors.

To ensure that the inspection of pharmaceutical importers is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of the pharmaceutical importers inspection checklist user manual.

To ensure that the inspection of retail pharmacies is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of a user manual for the retail pharmacies inspection checklist.

To ensure that the inspection of wholesalers is carried out with good standards, MOPH initiated the development of a user manual for the wholesalers’ inspection checklist.

This is the overall policy document for Waste Management and Safe Disposal of Pharmaceutical system for Afghanistan’s pharmaceutical sector. The goal of this document is to provide a comprehensive waste disposal system for medicines so as to ensure their safe destruction in a cost-effective and efficient manner; and to do this whilst also providing full protection of the environment.

This document is the overall policy for the product quality assurance (QA) system for Afghanistan’s pharmaceutical sector. This policy, the National Pharmaceutical Quality Assurance Policy, is part of continuous efforts by the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) and stakeholders to ensure the safety, efficaciousness, and quality of medicines.

This framework seeks to outline a national strategy for the development of pharmaceutical HR in the public and private sectors in Afghanistan to produce a stronger pharmaceutical system that responds to the population’s needs. In particular, the framework serves as a reference document for the Human Resources for Health plan and the HR section of the National Medicines Policy of the MoPH.

This document aims to present a concept for the establishment of an independent NMHRA in the country, through which the regulatory activities of various MoPH authorities are coordinated and incorporated so that it is ensured that medical products are of a better quality and that the medicines consumed in the country are safe.

The National Medicine Board was established in 2003 and then it was promoted to the National Medicines & Food Board (NMFB) in 2009. According to the Medicine Law (2008), the Board is the highest decision making entity on issues related to pharmaceuticals. Upon its expansion in 2009, the Board’s mandate was extended to include foodstuff.

Each year the world loses 300,000 women and more than 2 million newborns to preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Millions of mothers in low-resource settings miss out on proper antenatal care, give birth without a skilled attendant, and don’t receive postpartum care for themselves or their babies.

The National Medicine and Food Board (NMFB) was established in 2009, as an advisory board to the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) to advise, coordinate, supervise, and accelerate medicines and food-related activities . . . “to ensure the safety and quality of food products and prevent their unnecessary and unsafe manufacture, importation, distribution, sale, and use”.

Employee satisfaction refers to the employee’s sense of well-being within his or her work environment. It is the result of a combination of extrinsic rewards, such as remuneration and benefits, and intrinsic rewards, such as respect and appreciation.

Studies have shown that the role of a midwife before, during and after delivery can play a crucial role in preventing cross-infection between mother and baby. Mother-to-Child Transmission (MTCT) remains a serious threat, particularly with Zika and HIV viruses. Midwives have the power to change that. 

Over half a billion people have died in epidemics over the last century and most experts agree another epidemic is not a matter of if, but a matter of when. Are you ready? This one page summary of Ready Together was presented at the 2017 Conference on Epidemic Preparedness held at Harvard Medical School.  

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to help build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security as a national and global priority. Find out more about the GHSA, visit: https://www.ghsagenda.org/ 

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