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Hacia la mejora de la calidad de la atención materna para las mujeres indígenas de las Américas y la erradicación de la inequidad en salud, 2016 Sólo disponible en español

In the report Health for the World's Adolescents: a second chance in the second decade, the World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the health sector's important role in advancing adolescent health, but also notes that health services for adolescents tend to be highly fragmented, poorly coordinated, and uneven in quality.

Reducing preventable maternal mortality requires a surveillance system that systematically captures accurate, timely and disaggregated data on how many women die, where, why and when in the reproductive process. Health policymakers, programmers, advocates, and communities must then use surveillance data to inform their response to the factors contributing to maternal mortality.

The Mexican government is leading a movement – in collaboration with civil society partners – to strengthen the role of professional midwives in the continuum of women’s healthcare. Evidence shows that investing in competent, motivated, and enabled midwifery personnel is a cost-effective strategy to improve the quality of care and maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

Task-shifting mental health into general medical care requires more than brief provider training. Generalists need long-term support to master new skills and changes to work context are required to sustain change in the face of competing priorities. We examined program and context factors promoting and obstructing sustainability of a mental health task-shifting training for hospital-based HIV providers in Ethiopia.

MSH worked with school, community, and government partners to lead a pilot intervention with 30 adolescent girls (ages 13 to 19) at Government Day Secondary School, Tal in Billiri, Gombe State in northeast Nigeria for six months from 2014 to 2015.

The first edition of the mHealth Compendium, published in November 2012, contains 35 case studies which document a range of mHealth applications. Developed to assist USAID missions access relevant mHealth information, this compendium offers project descriptions, publication references, and contact information for making further inquiries.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. The mobile phone has become ubiquitous in Africa, making mHealth an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes. 

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. It can be a powerful tool for impacting the health of Africans.

To ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health services, a range of systems and service delivery interventions, identified as high impact practices (HIPs), help family planning programs focus their efforts and maximize resources to achieve broadest reach and greatest impact.

Mobile and wireless technologies assist health projects in accurately assessing the needs of a target population, collecting and disseminating relevant information, and delivering cost effective health services. This fourth volume of the mHealth compendium, published in October 2014, is a collection of 31 case studies.

The African Strategies for Health (ASH) project has produced six volumes of the mHealth Compendium containing 167 profiles of mobile health (mHealth) programs. The volumes document key mHealth resources, and describe featured programs and their results, lessons learned, and implementation challenges.

The mHealth Compendium series, developed by the African Strategies for Health project, has expanded the body of knowledge and increased access to the most current information on mobile technology solutions for health.

People in low-income countries purchase a high proportion of antimicrobials from retail drug shops, both with and without a prescription. Tanzania's accredited drug dispensing outlet (ADDO) program includes dispenser training, enforcement of standards, and the legal right to sell selected antimicrobials. We assessed the role of ADDOs in facilitating access to antimicrobials.

At the beginning of the HEAL TB project in 2011, culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST) using solid media was available to the program in two regions to detect drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) and for monitoring treatment response, which made identifying drug- resistance patterns possible and allowed health care workers to provide more appropriate drug treatment for DR-TB patients.

In Bangladesh tea and rubber garden workers and indigenous communities live in isolated areas with difficulties to access government health facilities. In addition, the level of poverty of some of these groups put them at risk of getting TB.

GeneXpert has revolutionized the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and drug resistant TB (DR-TB) by effectively detecting M. tuberculosis in clinical specimens and RMP resistance in less than two hours without sophisticated laboratories. This enables patients to begin treatment for rifampicin resistant TB on the same day, rather than after several months of ineffective treatment.

The e-TB Manager was used for drug resistant TB case management from 2010. The number of active DR-TB cases being managed in the system increased from 23 in 2010 to 1,037 in 2016.

Challenge TB was implemented in Ethiopia as part of Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH’s) Innovation Challenge Fund (INCH)2 initiative designed to encourage innovative interventions across MSH supported projects. MSH used the ExpandNet Framework3 to scale up the innovation.

Together with Borena and Guji zonal health department and the Oromia Regional Health Bureau (RHB), MSH, through the HEAL TB project (December 2015-June 2016) and now through Challenge TB (December 2016-present), identified six districts within the mining areas. Six woreda coordinators were trained and deployed to coordinate case finding and treatment observation.

Despite challenges of operating in emergency settings, the South Sudan Challenge TB project has been able to support improvements in case notification and other TB-related indicators. This technical highlight showcases implementation strategies, results, lessons, and reflections on the way forward.

Malawi has a population of 18 million, with an adult HIV prevalence of 10.6%. The country has made remarkable progress toward achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 goals, achieving the first goal remains a challenge. The Malawi HIV program estimated Malawi’s progress on achieving the 90-90-90 goals at 88-78-86 by June 2017.

Malawi adopted the 90-90-90 strategy as part of the National Strategic Plan to end HIV/AIDS by 2030 which calls for: identifying 90% of people living with HIV (PLHIV); initiating and retaining on antiretroviral therapy (ART) 90% of PLHIV identified; and achieving 90% viral suppression for ART patients.

Malawi is among the countries hardest hit by the HIV pandemic. The country has a national HIV prevalence rate of 10.6% of the adult population aged 15–64 years (12.8% women vs 8.2% in men). With 85% of Malawians living in rural areas, access to health services is difficult because of long distances, poverty, and other social factors.

HIV has been a global challenge over the past several decades, particularly in developing countries such as Malawi, where adult HIV prevalence is about 10.6%.

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