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As part of Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed, a global effort to stop children from dying of causes that are easily prevented, African Strategies for Health (ASH) supported the government of Ethiopia, USAID and UNICEF to convene the African Leadership for Child Survival Call to Action meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, January 16-18, 2013. The meeting focused on:

These standards harmonize prevention, treatment and care provided throughout the region’s transport corridors, starting from the existing Cross Border Initiative roadside wellness centers.

This report documents key topics presented and discussed at the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response 2013 Pre-Conference Workshop.

When planned and used appropriately, financial incentives have proven effective in improving utilization and quality of maternal and child care.

Health Care Financing Reform has allowed health facilities to retain and use their revenue for health service quality improvements. Hospitals and health centers in the three big regions started to retain revenue in 2005-2006, and now it is being rolled out to all regions as a national program. As a result of revenue retention, health facility budgets have improved significantly.

This report documents key points presented and discussed at the regional meeting “Scaling Up Mobile Technology Applications for Accelerating Progress on Ending Preventable Maternal and Child Deaths” held November 10, 2013 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on the fringes of the third International Conference on Family Planning.

In order for governments and organizations to adopt, implement, and scale up community health programs, knowledge of the wide typology of Community Health Worker (CHW) models and their associated incentive mechanisms is critical.

In Madagascar, community health workers play an essential part in improving access to quality health services in the context of a weak public sector and a severe shortage of trained healthcare workers.

The 2014 Ebola epidemic in West Africa is the largest in history. This brief summarizes information and communication technologies that have been used to optimize the Ebola response. It provides recommendations for policymakers and program managers seeking to deploy information and communication technology tools in outbreak settings that are applicable beyond the Ebola crisis.

The West African Abidjan to Lagos transport corridor crosses five countries through a densely populated and growing urban setting.

This brief discusses the impact of disease on trade, economic growth and commerce, with particular reference to the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Over the course of the project, African Strategies for Health, in support of USAID/Africa Bureau priorities, has engaged with thought leaders, innovators, and implementers on cutting-edge issues to build capacity and advance collaboration in the use of digital technology to improve health outcomes.

Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality in low-income countries. Over the past decade, the use of misoprostol for the prevention of postpartum hemorrhage in developing countries has gained attention as an effective strategy in settings where skilled birth attendance is low, particularly at the community level.

Many children in sub-Saharan Africa die before their fifth birthday from preventable causes, including malaria, diarrhea, and pneumonia. Integrated community case management (iCCM) is an effective, equity-based strategy that aims to train, equip, and supervise community health workers to treat children for these diseases at the community level.

Significant global investment in preventative and life-saving interventions for children under five years of age has greatly contributed to the reduction of the global mortality rate by nearly half from 1990 to 2013.

Malaria remains a significant burden to health systems, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, which accounts for 90 percent of malaria-related deaths worldwide. Not all patients are able to access timely and quality malaria services. A key strategy to enhance the utilization, provision, and quality of malaria services is the use of both demand-side and supply-side financial incentives.

As Rwanda looks to sustain and build on its hard-earned gains in health, it faces a few vital constraints. Donor funding is declining and the Health Sector Strategic Plan III is underfunded with a likely gap of $372- $697 million. Private sector investment, which could potentially help fill this gap, is only 1.7 percent.

The African Strategies for Health project and MSH participated in the Financial Protection and Access to Care Workshop, held in Accra, Ghana February 15-19, 2016.

Regional bodies have become active contributors to the development of Africa's health sector in the last 10 to 15 years.

In recent years, there has been a growing trend toward regionalization on the African continent, as integrated and cooperative efforts have created positive impact in political, economic, and social sectors. In Africa’s health sector, regional actors have become active contributors to development and health agendas.

In recent years, there has been a growing trend toward regionalization on the African continent. In Africa's health sector, regional actors have become active contributors to development and health agendas.

The African continent has seen pronounced movement toward regionalism in recent years to catalyze development and strengthen African integration and unity. Regional bodies are actively contributing to the development of many sectors, including health, which is increasingly recognized as essential to human and economic development in Africa.

Africa has seen a growing trend toward regionalism over the past 10 to 15 years, particularly in its health sector, as emerging health issues demand cross-border coordination and partnerships. Critical to an effective response to health issues is a strong health workforce.

Africa's health sector has seen a growing movement toward regionalism, as stakeholders increasingly work collaboratively and across national borders to advance health and development agendas. In the fight against malaria, strong partnerships across the continent have contributed to dramatic progress over the past 15 years. 

Maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) is a focal area for many regional bodies across Africa, as the continent currently accounts for more than 60 percent of all maternal deaths and almost half of all newborn and under-five deaths globally each year. Intergovernmental partnerships and crossborder collaboration add value to the fight to save the lives of moth

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