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On November 6, 2013, the Kenya ministry of health launched cancer management guidelines. Prior to the guidelines, cancer prevention and treatment had been addressed in divergent ways by the few physicians and practitioners, most of whom are not prepared to handle these challenges.

On September 6, 2013, Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya held a media event to launch the first comprehensive, locally developed formulary for a public sector health institution in Kenya. A hospital formulary is a document or manual listing all medicines approved for use in a specific healthcare institution.

This third issue of the Newsletter - HCSM Recap, builds upon previous editions in bringing out the latest global best practices in commodity management, supply chain and health systems strengthening. It puts Kenya experiences into global perspective as well as bringing out issues pertaining to the unique county set up.

Ten years ago, in 2004, testing positive for HIV in Ethiopia was a death sentence. It was the start of a painful decline, including illness and ostracism from society, ultimately leading to premature death.

The Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care, & Support (ENHAT-CS) program, a USAID initiative funded by PEPFAR. was an MSH-led consortium of national and international partners.

Background In Ethiopia, over 60% of all people who are eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) receive it. However, coverage is only 12% among children under 15 years of age. Due to scarcity of data and limited awareness of possible HIV infection, especially in older children, the AIDS epidemic among Ethiopian children appears neglected in national programs. Methods

In Ethiopia, male-dominated gender dynamics and health care provider attitudes lead many women to avoid or not fully utilize antenatal care (ANC) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services, creating barriers to women’s access to care and to interrupting vertical transmission of HIV.

Following the World Health Organization’s 2013 guidelines endorsing antiretroviral therapy for all HIV-infected pregnant women, Ethiopia adopted Option B+ (initiation of triple regimen antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the duration of breastfeeding or for life regardless of a pregnant woman’s CD4 count) as the national standard for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT

Ethiopia’s HIV prevalence rate is approximately 1.2 percent,2 equating to about 700,000 HIV-infected people. Since 2005, Ethiopia has been decentralizing free antiretroviral (ART) services from hospitals to health centers as a strategy to improve access to HIV care and treatment.

Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Early Infant Diagnosis:The Global Situation

Launched in 2009, the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP) expanded on work initiated by the Rwanda HIV/Performance-Based Financing Project (2005 – 2009), also funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

The Rwandan Ministry of Health partnered with the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP) to strengthen and coordinate its health information system. In 2009, when IHSSP was launched, the ministry had multiple systems to gather data from the country’s health services, but the systems used to aggregate and analyze the information were weak and were not interoperable.

The Government of Rwanda’s vision for its health system is that every citizen will consistently use health services that are easily accessible, meet international standards of care, and directly respond to individuals’ perceived and actual needs.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) can be an effective strategy for expanding the provision of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria services to children under 5 years old but there are concerns in some countries about the corresponding cost and impact. This paper presents and compares findings from a multi–country analysis of iCCM program costs. Data were collected on iCCM programs in seven sub–Saharan African countries: Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan and Zambia. The data were used to compare some elements of program performance as well as costs per capita and costs per service (which are key indicators of resource allocation and efficiency). A comprehensive understanding of iCCM program costs and results can help countries obtain resources and use them efficiently. To be cost–effective and affordable, iCCM programs must be well utilized, while program management and supervision should be organized to minimize costs and ensure quality of care. iCCM programs will not always be low–cost, however, particularly in small, remote villages where supervision and supply challenges are greater.

Tuberculosis (TB) patients face many psychological, social and economic problems that complicate treatment and care. This may lead to decreasing adherence to prescribed treatment regimens and poorer clinical outcomes, including higher loss-to-follow-up, relapse and mortality rates. 

Any outside supplier doing business with MSH by accepting a purchase order from Management Sciences for Health agrees to abide by MSH's standard commercial contract terms and conditions. MSH's standard commercial contract terms and conditions apply to all Purchase Orders issued by MSH.

Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax Under section 501(c), 527, or 4947(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code

In this third special issue published by the International Journal of Drug Policy, the authors of ten research papers and commentaries seek to provide additional knowledge on a range of issues related to illicit drugs in the region, including the epidemiology of drug use and drug-related infectious diseases and other consequences, drug treatment and harm reduction pro

The five-year anniversary of the Haitian earthquake brings Haiti to the forefront of international development conversations once again. Much of the dialogue has focused on the setbacks of large-scale infrastructure and rebuilding projects, but there has been important progress in some sectors, especially the health sector.

Given similar performance and knowledge of health workers trained in 7-day and 11-day courses, potential cost savings, the possibility of training more health workers and the relative ease with which health workers in remote settings might participate in a short course, it seems prudent to standardize the 7-day course in Afghanistan, where child mortality rates remain unacceptably high.

The importance of skilled management and inspired leadership are increasingly evident to those who are working to improve health system performance. Many of the critical challenges facing Kenya’s health system, including scarce resources and the changes resulting from devolution, are exacerbated by weak or absent management and leadership skills.

STRIDES for Family Health, 2009–2014

To reach communities underserved by the public health sector in Uganda, STRIDES for Family Health engaged private health care providers through a performance-based contracting (PBC) program. This intervention was one of STRIDES’ key strategies in providing access to quality health care for rural populations in Uganda.

In recent years, the global health community has been focusing more of its efforts and resources on fighting malnutrition—a complex problem that contributes to 45 percent of deaths among children under the age of five worldwide. Chronically malnourished children are, on average, nearly 20 percent less literate than those who have a nutritious diet.

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