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Purpose The Cost and Staffing Projection Tool is used to estimate the costs of achieving health worker staffing targets, comprising salaries and pre-service training costs. Description

As part of a collaborative effort by the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival (USAID/BASICS) Project, MSH conducted a comprehensive analysis of child survival, maternal, newborn and child health, primary health care, and hospital costs in Cambodia.

Multi-Drug Resistant TB is a major problem in many countries. Cases can be difficult to find and hard and expensive to treat. This tool provides a simple way for managers to compare the cost-effectiveness of different diagnostic and treatment strategies (e.g. hospitalized versus ambulatory treatment systems). 

Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) TB patients incur significant costs for seeking and undergoing treatment. It is important to understand these costs to develop appropriate levels of social protection to prevent people from deciding not to seek diagnosis or discontinuing treatment, or from suffering economic hardship as a result of treatment. 

Ms. Doris Ngozi Brendan, the Akwa Ibom State Program Manager, recently wrote a news article describing CUBS’ work to economically empower caregivers of vulnerable children in Nigeria.  This article was published on the Africare website. Africare is one of MSH’s subcontract partners on the CUBS project.

MSH believes that strong health systems are the best way to achieve health for all. In this report, we offer a glimpse of universal health coverage (UHC) as a framework for maximizing health impact.

Treatment as Prevention (TasP) describes HIV prevention methods that use antiretroviral therapy (ART) in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative persons to decrease the risk of HIV transmission.

Positive health, dignity and prevention (PHDP) engages people who know they are living with HIV in prevention. It involves supporting HIV-positive people to learn and practice how to live healthily and minimize the risks of spreading the virus to others.

This technical brief summarizes the latest evidence on PMTCT of HIV in the Southern African region. It presents the current WHO guidance on antiretroviral use in pregnant HIV-positive women: Options A, B and B+. Option B+ is a new development, emerging from experiences in Malawi, which was the focus of much attention at the recent International AIDS Conference.

This technical brief makes the case for understanding behavior change approaches as necessary but insufficient methods of HIV prevention. The document describes how behavior change interventions may be more effective when they are used as part of a  combination prevention approach that is shaped by a social-ecological perspective on HIV prevention.

In 2007, WHO/UNAIDS recommended that male circumcision be considered an important new intervention for HIV prevention, and that countries with a high HIV prevalence, low rates of male circumcision, and heterosexual epidemics should consider scaling up male circumcision as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention package.

There is growing awareness that well led and managed global health solutions are required to achieve effective and sustainable health programs, especially at the scale needed to attain Millennium Development Goals and other global targets. This compendium of case studies reviews the current evidence of the impact of leadership and management on health.

We need a dramatic change in thinking—and action from donors, policymakers, and program managers in the public, private, and nongovernmental (NGO) sectors—to focus on strengthening health systems in the countries most affected by HIV & AIDS. To meet the Millennium Development Goal of reversing the epidemic by 2015, we must change how we design and deliver services.

These guidelines provide standards for HIV prevention program implementation for non-governmental organizations and civil society organizations, against which services provided to the target populations can be monitored and evaluated to ensure quality and client satisfaction.

Management Sciences for Health’s Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa Project (BLC) and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) have written a series of technical briefs on priority HIV prevention topics.

Prepared by the AIDSTAR-Two project, this report documents the main changes resulting from a regional prevention program designed to meet the sexual health and HIV prevention needs of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Algeria, Lebanon, Morocco and Tunisia. As part of this program, the “Most Significant Change” approach was used understand the changes generated by the program.

Prepared by the USAID-funded AIDSTAR-Two project, this situational overview provides a detailed analysis of the response to the epidemic by associations and support groups of people living with HIV in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.

This technical brief developed by the AIDSTAR-Two project presents a framework that offers a simplified and systematic approach to organizational capacity building that most local implementers, especially those that provide HIV and AIDS services, can draw from to better fulfill or expand their mandates.

The NGO Communications Guide is designed to give those working in civil society organizations (CSOs) and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the areas of HIV and AIDS practical knowledge and tools to help them do two very specific things: One, learn to better tell the story of the work that they do; and two, develop an organizational communications plan.

In April, 2013, MSH’s TB CARE I team held an international workshop in Indonesia to share experiences on sustainable financing for TB, HIV/AIDS, and malaria control programs. Facilitators and participants attended from China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

Africa is the fastest growing continent in the world— with a projected average economic growth rate of 6 percent from 2013-2015. Health is becoming increasingly important as economies grow. This brief explores the relationship between health, economic development and trade in Sub-Saharan Africa by reviewing available evidence taken from published research and data.

Because of the uncertainties and questions about health development in fragile and conflict-affected states, home to one-sixth of the world’s population, including whether and how it can advance state legitimacy or security, the United States Institute of Peace convened a two-day conference in June 2011—“Postconflict and Fragile States: Challenges for the Next Decade”&mdash

Summary Despite the global initiative to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, 210,000 new pediatric infections were added worldwide in 2012 to the existing pool of 3.4 million children living with the virus.

Lessons learned from treating patients with HIV infection can inform care systems for other chronic conditions. For antiretroviral treatment, attending appointments on time correlates with medication adherence; however, HIV clinics in East Africa, where attendance rates vary widely, rarely include systems to schedule appointments or to track missed appointments or patient follow-up.

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