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To better understand whether childhood TB guidelines can inform the roles and responsibilities of maternal and child health providers and to identify opportunities for strengthening them, USAID's Africa and Global Health Bureaus and the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project assessed existing childhood TB guidelines in 13 countries in Africa.

An estimated 1 million children worldwide are infected with tuberculosis (TB) each year, representing about 11 percent of all TB cases.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a growing cause of death and disability in Africa, reducing individual and collective productivity and increasing health care costs. The African region is expected to experience the greatest increase in NCD deaths over the coming decade.

The USAID-funded African Strategies for Health (ASH) project undertook this childhood TB landscape analysis, to expand and centralize available information on childhood TB in Africa.

With more than 13.3 million mobile users in Angola, there are opportunities to use mHealth solutions to improve quality of care, access to health services, and health outcomes. USAID/Angola commissioned the African Strategies for Health Project to conduct a landscape analysis of mHealth in Angola, and develop a business case to determine opportunities and barriers for USAID investment.

Reducing the burden of malaria in Uganda is a priority for The National Malaria Control Program. While significant strides have been made, some components have not progressed to the same extent, including addressing malaria in pregnancy. This assessment was undertaken by the ASH project to examine facility-based factors that influence the coverage of IPTp among pregnant women.

The first edition of the mHealth Compendium, published in November 2012, contains 35 case studies which document a range of mHealth applications. Developed to assist USAID missions access relevant mHealth information, this compendium offers project descriptions, publication references, and contact information for making further inquiries.

Mobile and wireless technologies assist health projects in accurately assessing the needs of a target population, collecting and disseminating relevant information, and delivering cost effective health services. This fourth volume of the mHealth compendium, published in October 2014, is a collection of 31 case studies.

Malaria contributes significantly to maternal mortality and morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa. Preventing malaria among pregnant women is an important strategy for reducing mortality and adverse maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

The African continent has perhaps seen the most pronounced movement towards regionalism. In Africa’s health sector, regional bodies—such as regional economic communities and inter-governmental institutions, as well as regional professional associations and regional networks—have become active contributors to the development and health agendas over the last 10 to 15 years.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

From 2011–16, the HEAL TB project supported Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) in Amhara and Oromia regions to improve comprehensive TB services, including finding and treating TB in children, adults, and special populations; expanding multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) diagnosis and treatment; integrating TB and HIV services; improving laboratory diagnostics and reporting; and s

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project strengthens the capacity of Nigeria's public private, and community sectors for sustainable HIV/AIDS and TB prevention, control, care and treatment integrated within the health system. 

MSH designed and piloted this methodology and tool in Malawi and Sierra Leone, countries that were selected given the important role that community health workers play within each of the countries' health systems.

In February and March 2016, a team of MSH staff and consultants worked with the ministry of health, UNICEF/Malawi and other stakeholders to collect data that could be used to pilot the methodology and tool.

In February and March 2016, a team of MSH staff and consultants collaborated with the MOHS,UNICEF/Sierra Leone, and other stakeholders to collect data for piloting the methodology and tool.MSH staff conducted interviews and collected data at all levels of the health system, including visitsto health facilities in two districts where facility staff, CHW supervisors, and CHWs were interviewed.MSH st

This collection of stories represents some of the lifesaving work of USAID, Ethiopia's federal ministry of health, and the HEAL TB project.

Last year, tuberculosis (TB) killed more people than did HIV and AIDS—becoming the world's deadliest single infectious agent. More than 95 percent of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, especially those with weak health systems.

Through the Challenge TB project, MSH’s work contributes to USAID’s goal of a world free of TB as part of its End TB Strategy, which seeks to reduce TB mortality by 35 percent and reduce incidence levels by 20 percent by 2019.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

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