Resources

Results 126 - 150 of 178

Reducing the burden of malaria in Uganda is a priority for The National Malaria Control Program. While significant strides have been made, some components have not progressed to the same extent, including addressing malaria in pregnancy. This assessment was undertaken by the ASH project to examine facility-based factors that influence the coverage of IPTp among pregnant women.

The first edition of the mHealth Compendium, published in November 2012, contains 35 case studies which document a range of mHealth applications. Developed to assist USAID missions access relevant mHealth information, this compendium offers project descriptions, publication references, and contact information for making further inquiries.

Mobile and wireless technologies assist health projects in accurately assessing the needs of a target population, collecting and disseminating relevant information, and delivering cost effective health services. This fourth volume of the mHealth compendium, published in October 2014, is a collection of 31 case studies.

The African continent has perhaps seen the most pronounced movement towards regionalism. In Africa’s health sector, regional bodies—such as regional economic communities and inter-governmental institutions, as well as regional professional associations and regional networks—have become active contributors to the development and health agendas over the last 10 to 15 years.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project is a seven-year project (2009-2016) funded by USAID and implemented by MSH in five Nigerian states: Niger, Kwara, Kebbi, Sokoto, and Zamfara.

From 2011–16, the HEAL TB project supported Ethiopia's Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) in Amhara and Oromia regions to improve comprehensive TB services, including finding and treating TB in children, adults, and special populations; expanding multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) diagnosis and treatment; integrating TB and HIV services; improving laboratory diagnostics and reporting; and s

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project strengthens the capacity of Nigeria's public private, and community sectors for sustainable HIV/AIDS and TB prevention, control, care and treatment integrated within the health system. 

This collection of stories represents some of the lifesaving work of USAID, Ethiopia's federal ministry of health, and the HEAL TB project.

Last year, tuberculosis (TB) killed more people than did HIV and AIDS—becoming the world's deadliest single infectious agent. More than 95 percent of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, especially those with weak health systems.

Through the Challenge TB project, MSH’s work contributes to USAID’s goal of a world free of TB as part of its End TB Strategy, which seeks to reduce TB mortality by 35 percent and reduce incidence levels by 20 percent by 2019.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

This brief provides details on the achievements, challenges, and lessons learned from the TRACK TB project's Urban DOTS component. TRACK TB works to strengthen the capacity of the National TB/Leprosy Programme in Uganda, to provide leadership for TB response, and deliver quality, well-organized, and efficient services in close collaboration with other USAID programs.   

MSH-Peru builds on the success of the Healthy Communities and Municipalities I-II projects (2006-2015).  This program, and others managed by MSH in Peru, provided access to thousands of individuals, families, and communities in various regions of Peru to live healthy lives, while changing paradigms in health care and local development.  

The Integrated Health Project in the Democratic Republic of Congo was a five-year Cooperative Agreement (2010–2015) funded by USAID/Democratic Republic of Congo and implemented by MSH, with partners the International Rescue Committee (IRC), and Overseas Strategic Consulting (OSC), Ltd. The project covered 78 health zones in four provinces.

In recent years, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has increasingly focused on strengthening its health system and improving health outcomes for its 79.8 million people.

Performance-based financing (PBF) has been used increasingly to improve the quantity and quality of health services by directly rewarding providers with financial incentives based on achieved results.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been assisting Malawi since 2003 to strengthen health care systems, increase disease prevention education, reduce maternal and childhood mortality rates, and expand access to quality HIV/AIDS services.

MSH’s 45 years of history demonstrate that long-term investments in health systems strengthening and capacity building can result in sustainable improvements in health, saving lives of the most vulnerable people. MSH continues to strengthen health systems and facilitate innovations that save lives and improve health for all.

One of the key elements of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, which is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non- adherence results in increased length and severity of illness, death, disease transmission, and drug resistance.

To improve quality of HIV care in targeted districts, STAR-E scaled up the Ministery of Health quality improvement framework in March 2013. STAR-E targeted 66 facilities, including high volume and smaller facilities that were underperforming on key indicators.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version