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This technical brief presents analysis of the impact of differential fertility decline among wealth quintiles on population age structure in four African countries, the trajectory of these trends through 2050, and the impact on access to economic opportunity.

MSH worked with school, community, and government partners to lead a pilot intervention with 30 adolescent girls (ages 13 to 19) at Government Day Secondary School, Tal in Billiri, Gombe State in northeast Nigeria for six months from 2014 to 2015.

Increasingly a part of corporations' business strategies, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an expression of the business desire to create value for both the corporation and the community in which it operates.

In November 2015, the African Union Commission released this status report on maternal and child health. Developed with support from the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project, the status report is part of the African Union's contribution to enhancing MNCH on the continent. This is the third in a series of status reports prepared since 2012.

This report documents the outcomes of the Africa Regional Meeting on Digital Health for Overcoming Barriers to Ending Preventable Child and Maternal Deaths and Achieving Universal Health Coverage. From May 12-15 2015, over 150 government, private sector, and donor participants came together in Lilongwe, Malawi to exchange ideas and information on how to adopt and expand digital health technol

This report documents key topics presented and discussed at the first ever ministerial-level stakeholders meeting, "Investing in Technology and Innovations for Human Development in Africa," held on October 14, 2014 in Rabat, Morocco.

This report documents the proceedings of the International Conference of the African Evaluation Association in Yaounde, Cameroon, held March 3-7, 2014.

Integrated community case management (iCCM), the delivery of timely and low-cost interventions at the community level by community health workers, is an effective strategy for expanding access for the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which are the leading causes of child mortality and result in nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five years old.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) is considered to be an effective strategy for expanding the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which are the leading causes of child mortality and result in nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five years old.

MSH used USAID's iCCM Costing and Financing Tool to estimate the costs and impact of iCCM implementation and scale-up in two states of Nigeria: Kebbi and Benue. This study aims to forecast the costs and impact of introducing the iCCM program in Benue and Kebbi states.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) is considered to be an effective strategy for expanding the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which are the leading causes of child mortality and result in nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five.

Despite increasing investment into the country's primary healthcare system, Burkina Faso's population of more than 17 million experience a significant unmet need for basic health services, particularly those living in rural, hard-to-reach areas.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) is considered to be an effective strategy for expanding the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which result in nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five. Despite the success of this strategy in several low-income countries, iCCM programs in many other countries have yet to be implemented or expanded.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) is considered to be an effective strategy for expanding the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which result in nearly 44 percent of deaths worldwide in children under five. Despite the success of this strategy in several low-income countries, iCCM programs in many other countries have yet to be implemented or expanded.

Rwanda's Community-Based Health Insurance (CBHI) scheme has been recognized internationally for its success. From 2012 to 2015, MSH and the University of Rwanda-College of Medicine and Health Sciences-School of Public Health, studied the impact on access and equity of the scheme.

Community-Based Health Insurance (CBHI) is one of the key elements identified to achieve the goal of universal access to health care, which is central to the Rwandan government's strategy to become a middle-income country by 2020. Other key elements include performance-based financing to incentivize improved service delivery and quality improvement initiatives.

The study is one of a set of three pieces of work supported by The Rockefeller Foundation to help strengthen the Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI) program in Rwanda. 

Community-based health insurance (CBHI) is much debated as a way of tackling the challenge of providing access to health care for the poor in developing countries without worsening their economic situation.

Providing maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) services in rural locations in developing countries can be a significant challenge due to community isolation, poor infrastructure, and rare or inadequate health worker training.

On the eve of the 69th World Health Assembly, MSH and The Rockefeller Foundation release this progress report on the work of many organizations to develop concrete measurements of UHC progress – for both access to basic care and its affordability to all.

This assessment of the Scaling Up Family Planning Initiative was conducted as part of USAID's Evidence Project. The Scaling Up Family Planning Initiative aimed to strengthen the public sector's ability to expand access to contraception and family planning services.

To enhance cross-country learning around maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR), African Strategies for Health developed two country-specific case studies which document MDSR implementation experiences in Burkina Faso and Malawi. These case studies were developed for inclusion in the WHO Global MDSR Implementation Report and can be accessed on the WHO website. 

As part of Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed, a global effort to stop children from dying of causes that are easily prevented, African Strategies for Health (ASH) supported the government of Ethiopia, USAID and UNICEF to convene the African Leadership for Child Survival Call to Action meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, January 16-18, 2013. The meeting focused on:

These standards harmonize prevention, treatment and care provided throughout the region’s transport corridors, starting from the existing Cross Border Initiative roadside wellness centers.

This report documents key topics presented and discussed at the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response 2013 Pre-Conference Workshop.

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