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Final Report of the Rwanda HIV/Performance-Based financing Project

This report has been jointly issued by Human Rights Watch and the Safeguarding Health in Conflict coalition. Management Sciences for Health is a Steering Committee Member of the coalition. 

Study Tour Summary Document: February 14–23, 2014  Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and the LIVESTRONG Foundation (LIVESTRONG) sponsored a delegation of US Senate staffers, policy experts, and researchers to Uganda and Rwanda to examine the key elements of the countries’ health systems, with a particular focus on how the countries are addressing non-communicable diseases

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). According to the Federal Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development, one in every four children in Nigeria is considered vulnerable due to unmet needs for nutrition, education, shelter, care, or support. The Need for New Solutions

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million children who are considered vulnerable due to unmet needs for food, shelter, education, protection, or care With 3.4 million citizens living with HIV & AIDS, Nigeria has the second highest HIV burden in the world.

Nigeria is home to 17.5 million orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) who struggle daily to access food, shelter, education, protection, and care.

In Nigeria, as in most countries, women and girls assume the bulk of the caregiving burden for those infected with HIV and children left vulnerable or orphaned by AIDS. These responsibilities often prevent girls and women from obtaining an education and developing income-generating skills.

This report reviews the role of mother mentors and their Mother Support Groups (MSGs) in supporting HIV-positive mothers to live healthy lives and use appropriate health services.

A world where everyone has the opportunity for a healthy life—this is MSH’s vision, guiding our efforts to achieve lifesaving results by strengthening health systems. In the coming years, universal health coverage (UHC) will play a pivotal role in attaining this vision.

Indonesia has made great strides in expanding tuberculosis (TB) control over the last few years, with significant assistance from donors, such as the Global Fund. While there are presently substantial external funds for the Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), TB and Malaria health programs, these are likely to diminish greatly over the next few years.

An alarming number of countries are not on target to meet Millennium Development Goal to reduce maternal mortality despite efforts and investments made at both the global and national levels. Increasing access to and use of essential commodities for maternal health have recently gained attention as key concerns of several international initiatives.

In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), health systems have historically focused on the prevention and treatment of highly prevalent and frequently fatal acute infectious illnesses such as malaria, diarrhea, and respiratory infections.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the USAID-funded Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP), carried out a study to determine the costs of providing health centre services. The results of the costing were intended for use in re-designing insurance reimbursement mechanisms and levels.

Some countries have made great strides in expanding Tuberculosis (TB) control over the last few years, with significant assistance from donors, such as the Global Fund (GF) for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), TB and Malaria. While there is still substantial donor funding for TB programs, these funds are expected to diminish in countries that have improving economies.

Understanding the economic burden to society from a disease like TB is important as it can be used as evidence when advocating for greater investment. This report describes the development of a tool to estimate the economic burden of TB in Indonesia and the results stemming from its use.

This report describes recommended actions for the National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) to consider in developing its Exit Strategy implementation plan. It also describes a set of recommended technical assistance and training activities aimed at supporting the NTP in this process.

In many countries tuberculosis (TB) control programs are scaling-up the detection and treatment of TB cases to reduce the burden on patients, their families and society. This will result in significantly increased costs over the next few years until prevalence begins to fall.

Based on Primary Health Care approaches, the Ministry of Health (Myanmar) had formulated four yearly People’s Health Plans from 1978 to 1990, followed by the National Health Plans from 1991-1992 to 2006-2011. These plans have been formulated within the framework of National Development Plans for the corresponding period.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the USAID-funded Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP), carried out a study to determine the costs of providing hospital services. The results of the costing were intended for use in re-designing insurance reimbursement mechanisms and levels.

Ethiopia has a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) and is one of the 22 highest TB burden countries in the world. It is also one of the countries where many people who develop TB every year do not get treated. One of the reasons why infected people delay or do not seek diagnosis and treatment is economic access – the cost to patients and their families.

The purpose of this study was to develop estimates of the cost of the scaled-up scorecard interventions. Based on the action plans developed by the programmes, the interventions would require resources costing $79.9 million from 2007 through 2010 to achieve the targeted coverage levels.

The primary objective of this study was to model the costs and funding requirements of the Ministry of Health’s Minimum Package of Activities (MPA), which covers services provided by health centers.

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