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Practices that enable work groups and organizations to face challenges and achieve results.  

Primary Healthcare Revitalization, Integration and Decentralization in Earthquake-affected Areas (PRIDE) is a USAID-funded project to improve primary healthcare services and health outcomes in Bagh and Mansehra districts. PRIDE came into being in the aftermath of the earthquake that struck northern Pakistan on 8 October 2005, bringing devastation to a 30,000 sq. km.

The progress made on the Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC) Expanded Community-Based Distributor (CBD) Program during the period October 2002 to September 2003 was measured in terms of the following project indicators: Commodity distribution through the ZNFPC Pilot Program on Expanded CBD (with a focus on condom distribution)

The Advance Africa program was successful in working around the highly sensitive issue of family planning methods in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Despite the religious barriers in their public health arena, MSH trained more than 280 health providers in five provinces where the project worked.

The Accelerating Contraceptive Use Project, funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, contributed to dramatic improvement in the acceptance of family planning in parts of Afghanistan. The use of injectable contraceptives, oral contraceptives, and condoms increased by an average of 15%, 4%, and 7%, respectively, over one year in locations in three provinces.

Through the Advance Africa program, MSH helped rebuild the family planning system of Huambo Province in Angola for 2.2 million people using a community-based approach. The number of contraceptive users increased from virtually none to nearly 45,000 in 18 months. Working with the Ministry of Health, MSH used the Strategic Mapping approach to identify family planning goals in Angola.  

PRISM II provides the Ministry of Public Health with specialized technical assistance to integrate primary health care services and reproductive health into the country's national health care system. PRISM launched a leadership initiative in April 2002 with two Leadership Dialogue meetings in Conakry in collaboration with the MSH Management and Leadership Program.

MSH's 2007 annual report celebrates the remarkable evolution that has taken place in global health since the turn of the millennium, and we highlight some of the practical contributions MSH has made to support governments, service delivery NGOs, and other local organizations in that transition.

The five-year Leadership, Management and Sustainability (LMS) Program was awarded to MSH in August 2005 by the US Agency for International Development's Office of Population and Reproductive Health, in the Bureau of Global Health, and concluded in December 2010.

For four decades in more than 130 countries, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has taken a whole-of-society approach to development: MSH works with governments to strengthen their leadership and governance capacity and with private and civil society organizations to improve service delivery systems. Through this locally driven approach, MSH regularly works its way out of a job.

After approving malaria grants to certain countries, the Global Fund recognized that the recipients were facing problems implementing their programs as outlined in their project proposals.

In 2011, MSH was named a Top 40 Development Innovator by DevEx, one of the largest networks of international development professionals.

As part of a collaborative effort by the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival (USAID/BASICS) Project, MSH conducted a comprehensive analysis of child survival, maternal, newborn and child health, primary health care, and hospital costs in Cambodia.

MSH believes that strong health systems are the best way to achieve health for all. In this report, we offer a glimpse of universal health coverage (UHC) as a framework for maximizing health impact.

Prepared by the AIDSTAR-Two project, this report documents the main changes resulting from a regional prevention program designed to meet the sexual health and HIV prevention needs of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Algeria, Lebanon, Morocco and Tunisia. As part of this program, the “Most Significant Change” approach was used understand the changes generated by the program.

The NGO Communications Guide is designed to give those working in civil society organizations (CSOs) and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the areas of HIV and AIDS practical knowledge and tools to help them do two very specific things: One, learn to better tell the story of the work that they do; and two, develop an organizational communications plan.

In April, 2013, MSH’s TB CARE I team held an international workshop in Indonesia to share experiences on sustainable financing for TB, HIV/AIDS, and malaria control programs. Facilitators and participants attended from China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Indonesia.

Because of the uncertainties and questions about health development in fragile and conflict-affected states, home to one-sixth of the world’s population, including whether and how it can advance state legitimacy or security, the United States Institute of Peace convened a two-day conference in June 2011—“Postconflict and Fragile States: Challenges for the Next Decade”&mdash

Integrated community case management (iCCM) has proven to be an effective strategy for expanding the provision of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria services and has been accepted as a key approach to meet Millennium Development Goal 4 on reducing child mortality by international donors and developing countries.

Integrated community case management (iCCM) has proven to be an effective strategy for expanding the treatment of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria, which are the leading causes of child mortality and result in nearly 44% of deaths worldwide in children under five years old. This report describes the results of the testing in Senegal.

An Open Mind and a Hard Back: Conversations with African Women Leaders is a summary of interviews conducted with over a dozen women leaders from Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zambia.

Prepared by the USAID-funded AIDSTAR-Two project, this technical brief discusses country ownership in the context of organizational capacity building in public institutions and civil society organizations in the health sector.

Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) has helped over one million people receive HIV tests and learn their status. Every year SDSH made it possible for over 13,000 women to deliver their child with assistance from a facility- based, skilled provider, and has reached more than half a million children each year with nutrition services.

This report documents the lessons learned from the regional meeting on “Using Mobile Technology to Improve Family Planning and Health Programs” held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from November 12-16, 2012.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide; in 2008, it accounted for approximately 7.6 million deaths (13 percent of all causes of death). More than 70 percent of all cancer deaths occurred in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs).

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