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MSH authors have published a number of journal articles describing the accredited drug seller implementation experience and lessons learned in Tanzania—home of the flagship ADDO program. A new compendium reviews highlights ranging from robust multi-method quantitative to informative qualitative research. 

Managing Drug Supply (MDS) is the leading reference on how to manage essential medicines in developing countries. MDS was originally published in 1982. It was revised in 1997 with over 10,000 copies distributed in over 60 countries worldwide.

The Management of Medicines Benefit Programs in Low- and Middle-Income Settings manual serves as a primer for managers, government officials, or consultants who are tasked by a government, health insurance plan, or other institution with designing or implementing a medicines benefit program.

Lessons From a Quality Improvement Approach in Uganda

Due to its link to various complications during and after pregnancy, the prevention of malaria among pregnant women is regarded as an important strategy for reducing mortality and adverse maternal and neonatal health outcomes, such as maternal anemia, low birth weight, and perinatal deaths. 

This guide was developed as an abbreviated companion to the longer Management Sciences for Health publication Leaders Who Govern, with two main goals: To facilitate finding practical information about specific aspects of good governance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the world’s most pressing and urgent global health threats —one that could erode gains against tuberculosis (TB), malaria, HIV/AIDS, and many other infectious diseases. While AMR has emerged as a critical issue at the global level, current efforts to address AMR are insufficient to curb its spread.

Inside this issue: Enabling Proper Quantification of Essential Medicines Improved Coordination to Enhance Contraceptive Availability Establishing Common Criteria for Monitoring Supplier Performance Launching a New Pharmaceutical Logistic Information System Technical Sessions Continue to Promote Knowledge Sharing Public Sector Pharmaceutical Services Directory Released

The safety, efficacy, and quality of pharmaceutical products can be highly affected by the lack of adequate controls on importation. It is therefore imperative that the importation of pharmaceutical products conforms to certain set standards. In this context, the importation of pharmaceutical products should not be treated in the same way as ordinary commodities.

Afghanistan already has a pharmaceutical product waste disposal operation, and pharmaceutical materials are reviewed for disposal and destruction, but the current operation is generally believed to have many shortfalls. Attempts at estimating the scale of the issue using total throughput volumes of pharmaceuticals have indicated no major issue on waste disposal because not enough volume of ph

The goals of this new edition of the National Medicines Policy are to ensure the continuous development of the pharmaceutical sector and to meet the health care pharmaceutical requirements of all people living in Afghanistan, through the provision and use of safe, efficacious, high quality, cost effective, and affordable medicines and related products.

Building and strengthening health systems are difficult and take time.

Inside this issue: SPS Afghanistan Associate Award Stakeholders Update Pharmacy Curriculum National Food & Medicine Board Hosts Workshop Welcome from the Chief of Party   SPS & GDPA Attend International Conference SPS Assists MoPH with Emergency Medicine Order   Heath Communications Message Widely Broadcasted Transition of Drug Management Unit Completed

The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH), with technical and financial assistance of the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) project funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), carried out the medicines safety assessment from March to August 2013 in six Kabul hospitals.

In Afghanistan, 20 non-governmental organizations are contracted by the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) to provide support to the Basic Package for Health Services and Essential Package for Hospital Services (BPHS/EPHS) in all 34 provinces. The Pharmaceutical Logistics Information System (PLIS) was tested in all these NGOs in all the provinces in September 2013.

This national standard treatment guidelines (STGs) manual is designed for use at the first-level (i.e., primary) facilities delivering the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS).

The General Directorate of Pharmaceutical Affairs (GDPA) operates within the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in Afghanistan and is the prime body for managing pharmaceutical activities within the country in both the public and private sectors. MOPH recognizes the current difficulties on essential medicines and wishes to see a harmonized and integrated approach with a nationally coordinated m

The pharmaceutical regulatory situation in Afghanistan is generally considered to be weak with most of the activities in the private sector and, to a l arge extent, in the public sector largely uncontrolled.

This framework seeks to outline a national strategy for the development of pharmaceutical HR in the public and private sectors in Afghanistan to produce a stronger pharmaceutical system that responds to the population’s needs.

The pharmaceutical services competency framework defines competencies for core tasks in each area. Expert practitioners in each of the service areas identified the main tasks.

For largely historical reasons of development in a post- or ongoing conflict situation, the current essential medicines supply mechanisms in Afghanistan are characterized by multiple funding sources and a large number of active players, giving rise to fragmented and, currently, largely uncoordinated service from multiple, vertical supply streams of varying efficiency. This is not to say that

The Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health (MoPH), with technical assistance from the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program, carried out a survey of medicines quality in Afghanistan. The survey was conducted for the MoPH to determine whether medicines in the public and private sectors of Afghanistan comply with established international pharmacopeial standards.

The Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) with technical assistance from the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program carried out a qualitative survey of medicines quality assurance assessment in Afghanistan.

The MoPH established the National Medicines and Food Board (NMFB) in 2009, as a multidisciplinary body to oversee and catalyze regulatory activities in medicines and food products.

This medicine use study was planned, conducted, and analyzed by the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH). Data collection for the study was conducted in March and April, 2009.

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