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Strengthening information systems to support health data use is a critical component of quality improvement. In the past, research on quality of care has focused on the availability of resources and implementation of clinical guidelines, while often ignoring the regular metrics and monitoring systems used to inform decision making and manage improvement initiatives.

Current technical information for global health professionals

Because resources available to improve global health are limited, it is becoming increasingly important for those who produce and disseminate health-related information and services to gauge the impact of their work.

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). An estimated 60,000 new cases arise yearly, with 110,000 Afghans now living with TB; 14,000 Afghans died from the disease in 2015. Only about two in three presumed patients are found, and the treatment success rate is only 49 percent on average in the country.

 Photo credit: Mark Tuschman Version en français disponible à la suite de la version en anglais. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:  Small Grants Mechanism to Support Civil Society Engagement, Alignment, and Coordinated Action for Improved Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health, Particularly in Relation to the Global Financing Facility

Urban health facilities present particular challenges in TB service provision.

Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health and its consortium of partners, the goal of the five-year Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) program (2018–2023) is to help low- and middle- income countries strengthen their pharmaceutical systems to ensure sustainable access to and appropriate use of safe, effective, quality-assured, and affordable essentia

Following USAID’s Journey to Self-Reliance framework and the agency’s health system and disease-specific strategies, MTaPS strengthens country human resources and institutions to: develop sustainable, high-impact country capacity for transparent, accountable pharmaceutical systems-related law, policy, planning, leadership, and management; improve countries’ capacity to collect, a

USAID supports strategies to improve pharmaceutical-sector financing, including resource mobilization, allocation, and use.

Attaining the goals of universal health coverage requires clear policies, robust legislation, and sound management practices supported by good governance. This premise is relevant to pharmaceutical systems, which are particularly vulnerable to corruption due to the economic value of medicines and the multiplicity of stakeholders.

Weaknesses in pharmaceutical regulatory systems contribute to limited access to quality-assured, safe, and efficacious life-saving essential medicines, including those for malaria; HIV/AIDS; and reproductive, maternal, and childhood diseases, and to the disruption of health service delivery, thereby preventing achievement of better health outcomes.

In recent years, significant donor and global TB community support has led to encouraging developments, giving low- and middle-income countries better diagnostic, prevention, and treatment tools to increase case detection and improve outcomes.

An AIDS-free world requires resilient and sustainable pharmaceutical systems that ensure universal access to the best available diagnostic, preventive, and treatment tools.

Pharmaceutical systems and the health system in general in many low- and middle-income countries suffer from poor data availability and accessibility. Typically, data are manually collected at service delivery points and then sent to the district, regional, or Ministry level for processing and storage with the hope that they will be captured electronically and analyzed.

Ensuring the uninterrupted availability of quality-assured medicines and health technologies from the manufacturer to end users is the ultimate goal of pharmaceutical supply chain systems. However, strategies to strengthen key supply chain components are inadequate in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and systems cannot effectively manage local and global health program demands.

USAID MTaPS supports the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), whose purpose is to help build countries’ capacity to protect themselves from infectious disease threats and to raise global health security as a national and worldwide priority. The GHSA has 11 action packages, including one to combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

USAID MTaPS applies systems-based approaches using proven tools, interventions, and quality improvement methodologies to strengthen in-country capacity and enhance patient-centered pharmaceutical care. In doing so, MTaPS embeds the culture of quality of care emphasized by the Sustainable Development Goals, the World Health Organization, and other global and national bodies.

Despite making good progress toward digitizing client level data, the Government of Tanzania is still working to meet the latest global guidelines for HIV/AIDS programs. One major reason is that the country’s data collection and HIS do not efficiently deliver the quality information required for effective monitoring and planning.

Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal disease caused by a parasite that is spread to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes. For more than 50 years, chloroquine, an inexpensive and widely available medicine, has been used to cure malaria.

The international community has compelling humanitarian, political, security, and economic reasons to become involved in fragile states.

The Need for Change Management

This workbook is used throughout the Virtual Municipal Pandemic Planning (VMPP) Program. The program is divided into a series of modules, and each module has a chapter in the workbook. This program will introduce participants to a set of tools to assist mayors and their municipal leadership teams in pandemic preparedness, response, and recovery efforts.

Changing Malaria Treatment Policy to Artemisinin-Based Combinations: An Implementation Guide This document provides guidance to countries on implementing national policy changes to ACT for first-line malaria treatment consistent with the World Health Organization's (WHO) policy recommendations.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. Within Africa the mobile phone has become ubiquitous, making mHealth applications an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes.

There is growing awareness that well led and managed global health solutions are required to achieve effective and sustainable health programs, especially at the scale needed to attain Millennium Development Goals and other global targets. This compendium of case studies reviews the current evidence of the impact of leadership and management on health.

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