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A civil society organisation (CSO) perspective on how UHC can be reached by 2030 Universal Health Coverage 2030 (UHC2030) MSH is the secretariat for the Civil Society Engagement Mechanism of UHC2030, a global movement to build stronger health systems for universal health coverage.

In this edition, you will read about MSH support to Society for Women and Children Living with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria (SOWCHAN) advocacy march to the National Assembly on World Aids Day; how we are applying gender lens in Nigeria; and mitigating human resource gaps in general hospital Minna.

In this edition, you will read about MSH’s work in ensuring that Or- phans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) return to school in Nigeria, HIV Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) laboratory transitioned to the Global Fund and FHI360.

We are pleased to share this booklet that summarizes 10 of the best stories we’ve collected from the field. These narratives are a legacy to Madagascar’s health system and for future public health interventions in the country.

To improve quality of service provision and data accuracy and timeliness, USAID Mikolo is introducing mobile technology to replace paper-based tools used by community health volunteers (CHVs).Working alongside the Ministry of Public Health and other partners, the project has developed a smartphone application that CHVs will use to manage their health services and record-keeping and disseminate inf

Building Success is a series of guides offering practical, concrete, and innovative approaches that have proven effective in strengthening the response to HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis in Nigeria. Each of the four guides can stand alone, but they will be most effective if used as components of an integrated package.

Community health volunteers (CHVs) in Madagascar serve as first-line health care providers for many communities located more than five kilometers from a basic health center (CSB). They provide routine services for family planning and maternal, newborn, and child health, and refer patients for appropriate higher-level services.

In most countries, tuberculosis (TB) services are decentralized up to the most peripheral health facilities and often into the community. On the other hand, HIV/AIDS services are generally much more centralized because scale-up of services, especially of antiretroviral therapy (ART), started only quite recently.

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem in the regions of East, Central, and Southern Africa (ECSA). Because TB is an airborne disease, its transmission is facilitated by the movement of people across internal and national borders.

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