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The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and nature of adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized children at a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. We studied 600 children hospitalized at Jimma University Specialized Hospital between 1 February and 1 May 2011. Fifty-eight ADEs were identified, with an incidence of 9.2 per 100 admissions, 1.7 per 1000 medication doses and 9.4 per 1000 patient-days. One-third of ADEs were preventable; 91% caused temporary harms and 9% resulted in permanent harm/death. A strategy to prevent ADEs, including education of nurses and physicians, is of paramount importance.

This paper examines the needles and syringes that people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tajikistan use and factors that influence their choices. We conducted six focus groups in Kulob and six in Khorog, Tajikistan, with a total of 100 participants. Focus group topics included the needles and syringes used and factors that influence choice of needles and syringes. Most low dead space syringes are 1-ml insulin syringes with 12 mm 28 g permanently attached needles. Findings suggest that these will not be acceptable to PWID who need larger syringes and longer, thicker needles that are detachable. Low dead space detachable needles appear to be an acceptable option that could overcome barriers to the widespread use of low dead space equipment for reducing HIV and HCV transmission.

Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) bright-field microscopy is time-consuming, with poor sensitivity, even under optimal conditions. Introduction of Primo Star iLED fluorescent microscopy (FM) may improve TB case finding at referral hospitals in Rwanda. Laboratory technicians demonstrated high acceptance of iLED. The 100% concordance at both demonstration sites during the continuation phase shows technicians' rapid command of the new iLED microscope in a relatively short time. Additionally, fluorescent microscopy reduces the time necessary for examination by more than half. The high level of agreement between iLED and FM during implementation in both sites provides initial evidence for iLED to replace current methods.

In Uganda, the child TB cases reported in 2012 made up less than 3 % of the total cases while recent modelling estimates it at 15–20 % of adult cases. Mapping of these cases in Kampala District, especially for the children under five year, would reflect recent transmission in the various communities in the district. We therefore conducted a retrospective study of reported child TB cases in Kampala district Uganda for 2009–2010 to provide an estimate of child TB incidence and map the cases. There was a higher child TB incidence of 56 per 100,000 in 2009 compared with 44 per 100,000 in 2010. The percentage of child TB cases was much higher at 7.5 % of all the reported TB cases than the WHO reported national average. For the review period, the TB cases clustered in particular slums in Kampala district.

Retreatment ‘others’ refer to all TB cases who were previously treated but with unknown outcome of that previous treatment or who have returned to treatment with bacteriologically negative pulmonary or extra-pulmonary TB. This study was conducted in 11 regional referral hospitals (RRHs) serving high burden TB districts in Uganda to determine the profile and treatment success of TB retreatment ‘others’ in comparison with the classical retreatment cases. Of the 6244 TB cases registered at the study sites, 733 (11.7 %) were retreatment cases. Retreatment ‘others’ constituted 45.5 % of retreatment cases. Co-infection with HIV was higher among retreatment ‘others’ (70.9 %) than classical retreatment cases (53.5 %). Treatment was successful in 410 (56.2 %) retreatment cases. Retreatment ‘others’ were associated with reduced odds of success compared to classical cases. There is a need to review the diagnosis and management of retreatment ‘others’.

The study aimed to conduct capacity assessments of the community health worker (CHW) system and determine stakeholder perspectives of CHW performance. Formative assessments evidenced that CHWs were highly valued as they provided equitable, accessible and affordable 24-hour care. Their loyalty, dedication and the ability for women to access care without male family escorts was appreciated by communities. With rising concerns of workforce deficits, insecurity and budget constraints, the health system must enhance the capacity of these frontline workers to improve the continuum of care.

The new government led by President Muhammadu Buhari can re-energise the drive towards achieving universal health coverage (UHC) in Nigeria. A recent review of health-system financing for UHC in Nigeria shows high out-of-pocket expenses for health care, a very low budget for health at all levels of government, and poor health insurance penetration. The recently signed National Health Act is a viable framework, the implementation of which can fast-track progress towards UHC. Counterpart funding from state and local governments is at the core of the National Health Act implementation.

In 2011, Ethiopia introduced a strategy of symptomatic tuberculosis (TB) screening for patients attending out-patient services to increase identification of presumptive TB. We assessed implementation and factors affecting symptomatic TB screening in 86 health centres in the Amhara Region. A quarter (28%) of the health centres in this study had poor symptomatic TB screening practices in the out-patient services. Strengthening multidisciplinary teams and expanding partner support are recommended to improve TB screening practices in Ethiopia.  

We assessed community awareness about cervical cancer risk factors and symptoms and perceptions about prevention and cure of cervical cancer in order to contribute data to inform interventions to improve cervical cancer survival. In Gulu, a post-conflict district of Uganda, most participants (444/448) had heard about cervical cancer. Known risk factors, including multiple sexual partners, human papillomavirus infection, and early onset of sexual activity, were recognized by 88%, 82%, and 78% of respondents respectively. Targeted interventions including increasing availability of HPV vaccination, population-based cervical screening and diagnostic services can translate high awareness into actual benefits.

To provide the evidence to develop staffing norms for health facilities, the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN) tool of the World Health Organization (WHO) was adopted for assessing workload pressures to inform and improve human resource planning in facilities that provide HIV/AIDS services. This is a mixed methodology approach combining qualitative (separate group discussions for each OPC position) and secondary data extraction (number of patients/clinic from routine reports) in 23 outpatient clinics (OPCs) of Hai Phong City, Vietnam, from January-March 2014. The results showed that, with one exception, there is no shortage of manpower in the OPC system in Hai Phong. The pilot implementation of this toolkit for other HIV/AIDS service providers and other health care facilities could help calculate staff requirements, inform manpower planning, and help staff at health facilities develop job descriptions and plan their work accordingly.

Abstract Family caregivers play a critical role in caring for children living with HIV, however, there is little knowledge about their experiences. The aim of this study was to illuminate the family caregivers' lived experiences of caring for a child when he or she has been diagnosed with HIV and enrolled to antiretroviral treatment. Qualitative interviews with 21 family caregivers of 21 children diagnosed with HIV were analyzed using an inductive design with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The caregivers' experience were articulated in 5 subthemes under the main theme of "Surviving overwhelming challenges": "Committed care-giving," "Breaking the family life," "Caring burdens," "Confronting conflicts," and "Living with worry." Despite the difficult situation the family caregivers experienced with extensive worry, caring burdens, and disrupted family and social networks, they were committed caregivers. They were empowered by their belief in God but also by their strong belief in the child's treatment and support from healthcare workers. The healthcare system needs to consider possible ways to support the family caregivers during child's HIV diagnosis and treatment initiation as part of a continuum of care.

The objective of this study was to assess the quality of cotrimoxazole tablets produced by a Tanzanian manufacturer by a newly instituted quality assurance program. Tablets underwent a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy procedure with periodic quality assessment confirmation by assay and dissolution testing using validated HPTLC techniques (including weight variation and disintegration evaluations). Based on results from the primary test methods, the first batch of product was <80% compliant, whereas subsequent batches reached >99% compliance. This approach provides a model for rapidly assuring product quality of future procurements of other products that is more cost effective than traditional pharmaceutical testing techniques.

In this commentary, the authors discuss why integrating HIV testing, treatment and care into child survival platforms is important, as well as its potential to advance progress towards global targets that call for, by 2020, 90% of children living with HIV to know their status, 90% of those diagnosed to be on treatment and 90% of those on treatment to be virally suppressed (90-90-90). Integration is critical in improving health outcomes and efficiency gains. In children, integration of HIV in programmes such as immunization and nutrition has been associated with an increased uptake of HIV infant testing. Integration is increasingly recognized as a case-finding strategy for children missed from prevention of mother-to-child transmission programmes and as a platform for diffusing emerging technologies such as point-of-care diagnostics. These support progress towards the 90-90-90 targets by providing a pathway for early identification of HIV-infected children with co-morbidities, prompt initiation of treatment and improved survival. There are various promising practices that have demonstrated HIV outcomes; however, few have documented the benefits of integration on child survival interventions. The Double Dividend framework is well positioned to address the bidirectional impacts for both programmes.

Assessing the state of country readiness for the introduction of new, child-friendly anti-tuberculosis formulations can highlight potential bottlenecks, facilitate early planning, and accelerate access to appropriate treatment for children with tuberculosis (TB). To understand pathways and potential obstacles to the introduction of new pediatric formulations, we performed a desk review of key policy documents and conducted 146 stakeholder interviews in 19 high-burden countries. Issuance of World Health Organization (WHO) guidance serves as the trigger for considering adoption in most countries; however, the degree of alignment with WHO recommendations and duration ofintroduction processes vary. Endorsement by experts and availability of local evidence are leading criteria for adoption in upper-middle- and high-income countries. Ease of administration, decreased pill burden, and reduced treatment costs are prioritized in low- and lower-middle-income settings. Countries report an average of 10 steps on the path to new treatment introduction, with core steps taking between 18 and 71 months. The process of new treatment introduction is complicated by diverse country processes, adoption criteria, and evidence requirements. Challenges differ between low- and middle-to-high-income countries. Responsiveness to the unique hurdles faced across settings is important in ensuring a sustainable market for improved pediatric anti-tuberculosis treatment.

This systematic review (Jan. 2003-Dec. 2014) synthesized evidence on interventions that have directly reduced mortality in high-HIV-prevalence populations. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)was the only intervention identified that decreased death in HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Multivitamin use was shown to reduce disease progression while other micronutrients and antibiotics had no beneficial effect on maternal mortality. The findings support global trends in encouraging initiation of lifelong ART for all HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+), regardless of their CD4+ count, as an important step in ensuring appropriate care and treatment.

In 2014, the budget for high cost drugs in the Dominican Republic was USD 107 million, accounting for 51% of the Ministry of Health (MoH) budget for medicines. Resources allocated for the 2015 budget were USD 49 million, leaving a shortfall of USD 62 million. The MoH requested technical assistance from the USAID-funded SIAPS project to conduct an evidence based analysis of the 98 products included in the list.

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MDR-TB and associated risk factors in West Armachiho and Metema districts of North Gondar. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February 1 and June 25, 2014. A total of 124 consecutive smear-positive pulmonary TB patients were included in the study. Socio-demographic and possible risk factor data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Drug susceptibility testing was first performed for rifampicin using GeneXpert MTB/RIF. For those rifampicin resistant strains, drug susceptibility testing was performed for both isoniazid and rifampicin to identify MDR-TB. Of 124 smear-positive pulmonary TB patients, 117 (94.4 %) were susceptible to rifampicin, while 7 (5.7 %) were confirmed to be resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid. History of previous treatment was significantly associated with MDR-TB. Maximizing early case detection and treatment, strengthening TB infection control activities and proper implementation of DOTS are recommended to reduce the burden of MDR-TB.

This hospital-based study aimed to examine patient and primary healthcare factors and stage at diagnosis in women with cervical cancer in Northern Uganda in order to identify factors associated with advanced stages, to inform policies to improve survival from cervical cancer in low income and middle income countries. Of 166 patients attending care, 149 were enrolled and analysed. Most women were diagnosed at stages III (45%) or IV (21%). Understanding individual patient factors, patients' behavioural characteristics and healthcare factors associated with advanced stage at diagnosis is essential for targeted effective public health interventions to promote prompt health seeking, diagnosis at early stage and improved survival from cervical cancer.

The Government of Cameroon and its partners have made major investments in the last decade in prevention, treatment, and care of HIV-infected patients. However, unmet need for antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive pregnant women remains high at 66%. Critical to satisfying this need is ensuring adequate availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) commodities for rollout of new Option B+ guidelines. This study examines options for improving the supply and availability of these commodities. Supply chain operational data was collected in July 2014 from central (CENAME) and 4 regional warehouses (CAPRs); 10 district stores; and 30 service delivery points (SDPs), including ART and PMTCT sites. The study also included seven central private-sector logistics firms. In addition, SC cost data was obtained from CENAME and CAPRs financial statements. Data collected served for analysis of three options to improve effectiveness of delivering PMTCT commodities. Asset utilization within the cost recovery system ranged between 73% and 89% while inventory turnover was at 1.5. Therefore, a reliable supply of medicines to SDPs is ensured. However, for PMTCT and ART commodities, distribution to the SDPs was unreliable (in 2013, 40% of prescriptions remained unfilled). Meanwhile, results of the options analysis indicated that the model of CAPRs delivering PMTCT commodities to SDPs was the most desirable. Although the distance traveled was higher, the need for network storage space was minimal. Moreover, its total cost and human resource requirements were more favorable. As a result of disseminating the findings, the Ministry of Health adopted Option 2.

The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are the most common infections of humans in sub-Saharan Africa. Virtually all of the population living below the World Bank poverty figure is affected by one or more NTDs. New evidence indicates a high degree of geographic overlap between the highest-prevalence NTDs (soil-transmitted helminths, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, and trachoma) and malaria and HIV, exhibiting a high degree of co-infection. Recent research suggests that NTDs can affect HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria disease progression. A combination of immunological, epidemiological, and clinical factors can contribute to these interactions and add to a worsening prognosis for people affected by HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria. Together these results point to the impacts of the highest-prevalence NTDs on the health outcomes of malaria, HIV/AIDS, and TB and present new opportunities to design innovative public health interventions and strategies for these "big three" diseases. This analysis describes the current findings of research and what research is still needed to strengthen the knowledge base of the impacts of NTDs on the big three.

Early detection and treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an urgent global priority. Identifying and tracing close contacts of patients with MDR-TB could be a feasible strategy to achieve this goal. However, there is limited experience with contact tracing among patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis both globally and in Ethiopia. Here we present findings on the extent of screening symptomatic contacts and its yield in a tetrtiary hospital in a major urban setting in Ethiopia. Symptomatic household contacts were identified in 29 (5.7%) of 508 index cases treated at the hospital. There were a total of 155 family members in the households traced of whom 16 (10%) had confirmed MDR-TB. At least 1 confirmed MDR-TB case was identified in 15 (51.7%) of the 29 traced households. Tracing symptomatic contacts of MDR-TB cases could be a high yield strategy for early detection and treatment of MDR-TB cases in the community. The approach should be promoted for wider adoption and dissemination.

In 2010, the Ministry of Health (MoH) asked USAID for technical assistance to implement interventions to improve the HIV/AIDS supply chain system. Assessments revealed that fragmentation of the pharmaceutical system contributed to stock-outs and expiration of antiretroviral (ARVs) and other medicines and supplies used by disease control programs. The implementation of an integrated system was proposed as the most efficient and sustainable alternative to confront the HIV/AIDS pharmaceutical supply problems.

Since 2004 public provision of ARVs in the Dominican Republic has been funded, by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM). Until 2009 there was a gross correspondence between the increase in the number of treated cases and the funding. From 2009 to 2012, however, the number of cases grew at an average rate of 33.4% (2,958 cases) per year, whereas funding experienced an average decrease of 21.7% (965,382 USD) per year. In 2012, the Ministry of Health (MoH) carried out the first national quantification exercise for the 2013 procurement of medicines, under a standard forecasting methodology.

In 2013, an estimated 2.8 million newborns died and 2.7 million were stillborn. A much greater number suffer from long term impairment associated with preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, congenital anomalies, and perinatal or infectious causes. With the approaching deadline for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2015, there was a need to set the new research priorities on newborns and stillbirth with a focus not only on survival but also on health, growth and development. We therefore carried out a systematic exercise to set newborn health research priorities for 2013-2025. We used adapted Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative methods for this prioritization exercise. We identified and approached the 200 most productive researchers and 400 program experts, and 132 of them submitted research questions. These were collated into a set of 205 research questions, sent for scoring to the 600 identified experts, and assessed and scored by 91 experts. Nine out of top ten identified priorities were in the domain of research on improving delivery of known interventions, with simplified neonatal resuscitation program and clinical algorithms and improved skills of community health workers leading the list. The top 10 priorities in the domain of development were led by ideas on improved Kangaroo Mother Care at community level, how toimprove the accuracy of diagnosis by community health workers, and perinatal audits. The 10 leading priorities for discovery research focused on stable surfactant with novel modes of administration for preterm babies, ability to diagnose fetal distress and novel tocolytic agents to delay or stop preterm labour. These findings will assist both donors and researchers in supporting and conducting research to close the knowledge gaps for reducing neonatal mortality, morbidity and long term impairment.

To improve tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, many national TB programmes have committed to deploying Xpert® MTB/RIF. Implementation of this relatively new technology has suffered from a lack of comprehensive technical assistance, however, including the formulation of policies and plans to address operational issues. While providing technical assistance, we observed numerous operational challenges in the implementation and scale-up of Xpert in five sub-Saharan African countries: low coverage, poor laboratory infrastructure, limited access, poor linkages to treatment, inadequate data on outcomes, problems with specimen transport, diagnostic algorithms that are not aligned with updated World Health Organization recommendations on target patient groups and financing challenges. We recommend better country preparedness and training, laboratory information and quality systems, supply management and referral mechanisms.

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