Resources

Results 901 - 925 of 966

To see this page and download the case studies in English, click here.

Para ver esta página en español y descargar los estudios de caso, hacer clic aquí. 

This guide provides national stakeholders and advocates with information and guidance to update the national EML to include a new commodity, a new indication, or a new formulation based on the available evidence and based on country need and disease burden.

Hosted by MSH, Gynuity Health Projects, and Jhpiego, this one-hour webinar shared innovations – interventions, technologies, and distribution approaches – that have the potential to increase access to and use of misoprostol for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), the leading cause of maternal death. This webinar:

In light of the 2016 Zika virus outbreak in Latin America and the Caribbean, the Regional Task Force for the Reduction of Maternal Mortality, of which MSH is an executive committee member, produced these cards to provide information and recommendations for sexual and reproductive health policy, programs, and actions.

On January 24, 2017, MSH released a statement responding to the Trump administration's re-instatement and expansion of the Mexico City Policy, also known as the Global Gag Rule. This policy—more wide-reaching than in previous iterations—will harm the well-being and resiliency of families, communities, nations and economies.

Hacia la mejora de la calidad de la atención materna para las mujeres indígenas de las Américas y la erradicación de la inequidad en salud, 2016 Sólo disponible en español

In the report Health for the World's Adolescents: a second chance in the second decade, the World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the health sector's important role in advancing adolescent health, but also notes that health services for adolescents tend to be highly fragmented, poorly coordinated, and uneven in quality.

Reducing preventable maternal mortality requires a surveillance system that systematically captures accurate, timely and disaggregated data on how many women die, where, why and when in the reproductive process. Health policymakers, programmers, advocates, and communities must then use surveillance data to inform their response to the factors contributing to maternal mortality.

The Mexican government is leading a movement – in collaboration with civil society partners – to strengthen the role of professional midwives in the continuum of women’s healthcare. Evidence shows that investing in competent, motivated, and enabled midwifery personnel is a cost-effective strategy to improve the quality of care and maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

In spite of substantial advances in maternal and newborn health over recent decades, roughly 300,000 girls and women still die due to pregnancy-related complications every year. At present, the global community largely agrees on what needs to be done to prevent these deaths and improve the health and wellbeing of women and babies.

National Essential Medicines lists (EMLs) indicate medicines that meet the priority health needs of the population and often guide a government’s purchasing and distribution decisions for public health facilities.

A key element of successful tuberculosis (TB) control programs is adherence to treatment, and this is a cornerstone of most international and national policies and guidelines. Non-adherence is often due to patient-related factors but can also be a result of provider issues, such as stock-outs of TB medicines.

Purpose: The Quality Assurance Manual can be used by national, state or local level health institutions to evaluate the quality of health services at service delivery sites, to determine whether they meet predetermined quality standards in order to be accredited.

The objective of this study was to implement a rapid assessment of the performance of four malaria control strategies (indoor spraying, insecticide-treated bed nets, timely diagnosis, and artemisinin-based combination therapy) using adequacy criteria. The assessment was carried out in five countries of the Amazon subregion (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, and Peru). Although ACT is the strategy with the better implementation in all countries, major gaps exist in implementation of the other three malaria control strategies in terms of technical criteria, coverage and quality desired. The countries must implement action plans to close the gaps in the various criteria and thereby improve the performance of the interventions. The assessment tools developed, based on adequacy criteria, are considered useful for a rapid assessment by malaria control authorities in the different countries.

Over the past two decades, Ethiopia has improved its delivery of primary health care services and begun to make great progress toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals, particularly with regard to maternal, newborn, and child health and the prevention and control of HIV and tuberculosis.

Final Report: Help Ethiopia Address Low TB Performance (HEAL TB) Project 2011–2016

A Review of SIAPS’ Activities in Eight Countries The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program has published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

Employee satisfaction refers to the employee’s sense of well-being within his or her work environment. It is the result of a combination of extrinsic rewards, such as remuneration and benefits, and intrinsic rewards, such as respect and appreciation.

Health Systems in Action: An eHandbook for Leaders and Managers is an electronic resource that provides managers of health programs or health services with both practical and theoretical information to help strengthen and align the building blocks of a health system.

The Human Resource Management (HRM) Rapid Assessment Tool offers a method for assessing an organization’s human resource management system and how well it functions. This tool helps users to develop strategies to improve the human resource management system and make it as effective as possible. It is designed to be used in public and private health organizations.

Strong leadership and management skills are crucial to finding solutions to the human resource crisis in health. Health professionals and human resource (HR) managers worldwide who are in charge of addressing HR challenges in health systems often lack formal education in leadership and management. Management Sciences for Health (MSH) developed the Virtual Leadership Development Program (VLDP) with support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The VLDP is a Web-based leadership development programme that combines face-to-face and distance-learning methodologies to strengthen the capacity of teams to identify and address health challenges and produce results. The USAID-funded Leadership, Management and Sustainability (LMS) Program adapted the VLDP for HR managers to help them identify and address HR challenges that ministries of health, other public-sector organizations and nongovernmental organizations are facing. Three examples illustrate the results of the VLDP for teams of HR managers: (1) the Uganda Protestant and Catholic Medical Bureaus; (2) the Christian Health Association of Malawi; and (3) the Developing Human Resources for Health Project in Uganda.

A presentation delivered at the Union World Conference on Lung Health 2012 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  Presentation Outline Background ChallengestoimplementingTBservices Interventionsapplied Results and lessons learned Recommendations Conclusion   

The aim of the present study was to indentify the epidemiological factors of drug-resistant (DR TB) patients in the northern part of Bangladesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted of registered DR TB patients at two chest diseases hospitals. The present study demonstrated that males (68.9%) were more affected by DR TB than females (31.8%).This study suggested that sex, age, type of treatment, residence, education and smoking status were important factors for getting MDR TB. It is expected that this study can help government to take activities for controlling and prevent MDR TB disease.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version