Resources

Results 726 - 750 of 966

To better understand whether childhood TB guidelines can inform the roles and responsibilities of maternal and child health providers and to identify opportunities for strengthening them, USAID's Africa and Global Health Bureaus and the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project assessed existing childhood TB guidelines in 13 countries in Africa.

An estimated 1 million children worldwide are infected with tuberculosis (TB) each year, representing about 11 percent of all TB cases.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a growing cause of death and disability in Africa, reducing individual and collective productivity and increasing health care costs. The African region is expected to experience the greatest increase in NCD deaths over the coming decade.

The USAID-funded African Strategies for Health (ASH) project undertook this childhood TB landscape analysis, to expand and centralize available information on childhood TB in Africa.

With more than 13.3 million mobile users in Angola, there are opportunities to use mHealth solutions to improve quality of care, access to health services, and health outcomes. USAID/Angola commissioned the African Strategies for Health Project to conduct a landscape analysis of mHealth in Angola, and develop a business case to determine opportunities and barriers for USAID investment.

Abstract Background: To ascertain equity in financing for essential medicines and health supplies (EMHS) in Uganda, this paper explores the relationships among government funding allocations for EMHS, patient load, and medicines availability across facilities at different levels of care.

Abstract The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi was based on a public health approach adapted to its resource-poor setting, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful tuberculosis control framework. From 2004 to 2015, the number of new patients started on ART increased from about 3,000 to over 820,000.

Abstract Purpose: Active surveillance pharmacovigilance systems better estimate the burden of adverse events (AEs) and can generate useful information on risk factors of AEs for more effective medicine use, especially in conjunction with introduction of new medicines and/or changes in treatment guidelines.

Abstract Introduction: Active surveillance pharmacovigilance is a systematic approach to medicine safety assessment and health systems strengthening, but has not been widely implemented in low- and middle-income countries.

Abstract Background: One of the main goals of the post-2015 global tuberculosis (TB) strategy is that no families affected by TB face catastrophic costs. We revised an existing TB patient cost measurement tool to specifically also measure multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB patients’ costs and applied it in Ethiopia, Indonesia and Kazakhstan.

The first edition of the mHealth Compendium, published in November 2012, contains 35 case studies which document a range of mHealth applications. Developed to assist USAID missions access relevant mHealth information, this compendium offers project descriptions, publication references, and contact information for making further inquiries.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the use of mobile and wireless technologies to support the achievement of health objectives. The rapid growth in access to mobile phones and networks has opened opportunities for health programs and systems to harness these technologies to positively impact the health of Africans.

Mobile and wireless technologies assist health projects in accurately assessing the needs of a target population, collecting and disseminating relevant information, and delivering cost effective health services. This fourth volume of the mHealth compendium, published in October 2014, is a collection of 31 case studies.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. The mobile phone has become ubiquitous in Africa, making mHealth an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes. 

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. It can be a powerful tool for impacting the health of Africans.

The mHealth Compendium series, developed by the African Strategies for Health project, has expanded the body of knowledge and increased access to the most current information on mobile technology solutions for health.

Mobile health (mHealth) is the provision of health services and information via mobile and wireless technologies. Within Africa the mobile phone has become ubiquitous, making mHealth applications an important tool with which to impact the health of Africans. When applied correctly, mHealth can make real contributions to improved health outcomes.

The African Strategies for Health (ASH) project has produced six volumes of the mHealth Compendium containing 167 profiles of mobile health (mHealth) programs. The volumes document key mHealth resources, and describe featured programs and their results, lessons learned, and implementation challenges.

Despite the growing international trend towards increased regional multilateralism, integration, and cooperation in health and other sectors, there is a limited body of literature examining the relationships, power dynamics, limitations, and strategic advantages of regional bodies.

The African continent has perhaps seen the most pronounced movement towards regionalism. In Africa’s health sector, regional bodies—such as regional economic communities and inter-governmental institutions, as well as regional professional associations and regional networks—have become active contributors to the development and health agendas over the last 10 to 15 years.

African regional organizations play critical roles in advancing health and development agendas. To enhance understanding of the contributions and role of regional bodies engaged in health in Africa, the African Strategies for Health (ASH) project reviewed the evidence on regionalization and the relationships, strategic advantages, and limitations of regional actors. 

Once thought nearly conquered, tuberculosis (TB) is now a global epidemic. With the combined threats of HIV, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, as well as the emergence of multi-drug resistant TB, the challenges of the disease are overwhelming national health systems. Yet TB is preventable, diagnosable, and curable.

In response to the HIV and TB epidemics, Management Sciences for Health builds the capacity of our public and private sector partners to prevent TB and HIV and improve diagnosis and management of co-infected patients.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project strengthens the capacity of Nigeria's public private, and community sectors for sustainable HIV/AIDS and TB prevention, control, care and treatment integrated within the health system. This fact sheet shows the project's results in Kebbi State from October 2013 to July 2016.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems - AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project strengthens the capacity of Nigeria's public private, and community sectors for sustainable HIV/AIDS and TB prevention, control, care and treatment integrated within the health system. This fact sheet shows project results nationwide from August 2009 to July 2016.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version