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Proposal template Small Grants Mechanism

Because resources available to improve global health are limited, it is becoming increasingly important for those who produce and disseminate health-related information and services to gauge the impact of their work.

MSH has 10 TENs composed of approximately 600 members from 45 countries. Over two-thirds of members are based in field-based projects supported by MSH. Each TEN is focused on a technical area, such as reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis; a health systems function, such as leadership and governance, health care finance, and human resources for health; or cross-cutting topics, such as gender, youth, monitoring and evaluation, and country operations. A review of the literature, development of an operational framework, assessment, and analysis with case examples provide important insights into how the TENs can be used to collaborate with peers around the world and add value to the agency’s mission and vision. MSH now can identify which TENs are ready to be pushed to the next level of functionality to meet MSH’s evolving performance and learning priorities.

The Knowledge Management Indicator Library is a comprehensive resource for measuring knowledge management in global public health with a searchable database of generalized indicators. The library can be used by knowledge management, monitoring and evaluation, communication, and program management professionals as they manage and share knowledge.  

This report summarizes significant USAID MTaPS achievements, key challenges, program performance, and adaptation in response to new demands and lessons learned for the October through December 2018 period. The report is organized by health area, objective, region, and country.

To upgrade from an older version of QuanTB download and read these instructions. QuanTB 4.2 QuanTB E-Course An e-course for health professionals on how to use QuanTB, a downloadable forecasting, quantification and early warning tool for TB medicines. Version 4.2 available as of  31 January 2019.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Foire aux questions (FAQs)

The TRACK TB project’s goal was to increase the case detection rate (CDR) and the treatment success rate (TSR) in focus areas to meet national targets for reducing the burden of TB, MDR-TB, and TB/HIV.

Determining the cost of health services is an essential step toward strengthening health systems and working toward universal health coverage.

For over 40 years, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has been working in partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around the world to support the delivery of community-based health services to underserved populations.As NGOs and civil society become more prominent in the delivery of health care and related services, such as advocacy and health education, local organizations have gr

Afghanistan faces a burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the highest in the world, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). An estimated 60,000 new cases arise yearly, with 110,000 Afghans now living with TB; 14,000 Afghans died from the disease in 2015. Only about two in three presumed patients are found, and the treatment success rate is only 49 percent on average in the country.

 Photo credit: Mark Tuschman Version en français disponible à la suite de la version en anglais. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:  Small Grants Mechanism to Support Civil Society Engagement, Alignment, and Coordinated Action for Improved Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health, Particularly in Relation to the Global Financing Facility

Urban health facilities present particular challenges in TB service provision.

This webinar, presented on March 19, 2019, explores how expanding the World Health Organization’s directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS) strategy to the densely populated city of Kabul has helped the country strengthen its TB control efforts. Implemented by USAID's Challenge TB Project in partnership with MSH and a broad coalition of organizations and health workers in pu

Funded by USAID and led by Management Sciences for Health and its consortium of partners, the goal of the five-year Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) program (2018–2023) is to help low- and middle- income countries strengthen their pharmaceutical systems to ensure sustainable access to and appropriate use of safe, effective, quality-assured, and affordable essentia

Following USAID’s Journey to Self-Reliance framework and the agency’s health system and disease-specific strategies, MTaPS strengthens country human resources and institutions to: develop sustainable, high-impact country capacity for transparent, accountable pharmaceutical systems-related law, policy, planning, leadership, and management; improve countries’ capacity to collect, a

USAID supports strategies to improve pharmaceutical-sector financing, including resource mobilization, allocation, and use.

Attaining the goals of universal health coverage requires clear policies, robust legislation, and sound management practices supported by good governance. This premise is relevant to pharmaceutical systems, which are particularly vulnerable to corruption due to the economic value of medicines and the multiplicity of stakeholders.

Weaknesses in pharmaceutical regulatory systems contribute to limited access to quality-assured, safe, and efficacious life-saving essential medicines, including those for malaria; HIV/AIDS; and reproductive, maternal, and childhood diseases, and to the disruption of health service delivery, thereby preventing achievement of better health outcomes.

In recent years, significant donor and global TB community support has led to encouraging developments, giving low- and middle-income countries better diagnostic, prevention, and treatment tools to increase case detection and improve outcomes.

An AIDS-free world requires resilient and sustainable pharmaceutical systems that ensure universal access to the best available diagnostic, preventive, and treatment tools.

Pharmaceutical systems and the health system in general in many low- and middle-income countries suffer from poor data availability and accessibility. Typically, data are manually collected at service delivery points and then sent to the district, regional, or Ministry level for processing and storage with the hope that they will be captured electronically and analyzed.

Ensuring the uninterrupted availability of quality-assured medicines and health technologies from the manufacturer to end users is the ultimate goal of pharmaceutical supply chain systems. However, strategies to strengthen key supply chain components are inadequate in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and systems cannot effectively manage local and global health program demands.

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