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A poster presented at a MSH Kenya symposium, Achieving Universal Health Coverage through Stronger Health Systems, April 28, 2014, Crown Plaza Hotel, Nairobi Upper Hill.

A poster presented at a MSH Kenya symposium, Achieving Universal Health Coverage through Stronger Health Systems, April 28, 2014, Crown Plaza Hotel, Nairobi Upper Hill.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health partnered with the Integrated Health Systems Strengthening Project (IHSSP) to strengthen and coordinate its health information system. In 2009, when IHSSP was launched, the ministry had multiple systems to gather data from the country’s health services, but the systems used to aggregate and analyze the information were weak and were not interoperable.

Good governance involves constantly striving for better results and improved effectiveness. It requires an interest in and commitment towards continuous improvement. This guide discusses actions that can improve organizations' governance on a continuing basis.

This training handbook facilitates governance orientation and education for leaders and officials who govern health centers. When used by the facilitators in conjunction with the LMG Project’s good governance resources, participants will be able to master and apply the five practices of good governance in their organization, improving its performance.

This handbook facilitates the governance orientation and education for ministry of health officials. When used by facilitators in conjunction with the LMG Project’s guides and learning resources, participants will be able to master and apply the five practices of good governance in their organization, improving its performance.

This handbook is designed to facilitate the governance orientation and education for leaders and officials who govern hospitals. When used by the facilitators in conjunction with the LMG Project’s guides and learning resources, participants will be able to master and apply the five practices of good governance in their organization, improving its performance.

This handbook facilitates the governance orientation and education for officials and leaders who govern provincial health systems. When used by facilitators in conjunction with the LMG Project’s guides and learning resources, participants will be able to master and apply the five practices of good governance in their organization, improving its performance.

Governance of Health Systems and Health Organizations is intended to support the important work of the leaders who govern health service delivery organizations.

This issue of The eManager focuses on governing in the health sector, and presents four effective governing practices and their nine key enablers. It shows how health leaders and managers can contribute to a better-governed institution and, ultimately, improve health services and the health of the people they serve.

The leaders who govern determine an organization’s strategic direction and policies. They set the organization’s strategy in order to deliver on its mission, goals, and objectives. This guide explores how to set, and realize, shared strategic direction for organizations when working with stakeholders.

This book is designed to help readers explore, master, and apply the practices of good governance in the context of health. The principles and practices discussed in this book apply to most types of organizations and also to sectors beyond health. Readers can use this guide to shape how their investment in smarter governance within the health system.

DRC has one of the highest rates of malaria-related deaths in the world, particularly for children under five.

When accountability is strengthened, the opportunity for corruption diminishes, and beneficial outcomes of the health system, such as responsiveness, equity, and efficiency surge.

Harmoniser les services de santé : Sauver des vies grâce à l’intégration des programmes de santé reproductive, maternelle, néonatale et infantile avec ceux relatifs au VIH/SIDA, à la tuberculose et au paludisme (French title)

MSH Nigeria published this newsletter in July 2016. Newsletter Contents MSH Nigeria Presents 7 Posters at Intl. AIDS Conference MSH Pays Courtesy Call on the Minister of Health From the Country Rep  MSH Celebrates 10 Years of Health Impact in Nigeria CBHI Saves Baby Rosemary’s Life MSH Nigeria Receives Award of Excellence MSH Trains TBAs in Akwa Ibom State

Malaria remains a significant burden to health systems, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, which accounts for 90 percent of malaria-related deaths worldwide. Not all patients are able to access timely and quality malaria services. A key strategy to enhance the utilization, provision, and quality of malaria services is the use of both demand-side and supply-side financial incentives.

In recent years, there has been a growing trend toward regionalization on the African continent. In Africa's health sector, regional actors have become active contributors to development and health agendas.

Africa's health sector has seen a growing movement toward regionalism, as stakeholders increasingly work collaboratively and across national borders to advance health and development agendas. In the fight against malaria, strong partnerships across the continent have contributed to dramatic progress over the past 15 years. 

Reducing the burden of malaria in Uganda is a priority for The National Malaria Control Program. While significant strides have been made, some components have not progressed to the same extent, including addressing malaria in pregnancy. This assessment was undertaken by the ASH project to examine facility-based factors that influence the coverage of IPTp among pregnant women.

The global partnership fighting malaria has witnessed much success in the last 20 years. Malaria is no longer the leading cause of illness and death among children under five, yet multiple challenges remain in the fight. An estimated 445,000 deaths occurred in 2016, compared to 446,000 in 2015, and 91 percent of these deaths occur in Africa.

A Review of SIAPS’ Activities in Eight Countries The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program has published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

Lessons From a Quality Improvement Approach in Uganda

Due to its link to various complications during and after pregnancy, the prevention of malaria among pregnant women is regarded as an important strategy for reducing mortality and adverse maternal and neonatal health outcomes, such as maternal anemia, low birth weight, and perinatal deaths. 

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