Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa

Project Overview

The Building Local Capacity for Delivery of HIV Services in Southern Africa Project (BLC) strengthens government, parastatal, and civil society entities to effectively address the challenges of the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Throughout the Southern Africa region and with specific activities in six countries—Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, and Swaziland— BLC provides technical assistance in organizational development, including leadership, management, and governance in three key program areas: 1) care and support for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC); 2) HIV prevention; and 3) community-based care. 

The BLC Project works in the Southern Africa Region at the community, national, and regional level to:

  • Build the capacity of government agencies at district and national levels to improve, coordinate, and deliver services their citizens
  • Build the capacity of local civil society organizations to improve the coordination of HIV-related services for communities, orphans and vulnerable children, and migrants
  • Improve the skills of hospital and clinic-based health workers to continuously improve the quality of services they provide
  • Improve the functioning of the Global Fund Principal Recipients by assisting them to acquire staff and establish structures, systems, and procedures
  • Build the technical, leadership, and management capacities of regional partners to become direct recipients of funding from the US Government and other donors
  • Develop the capacity of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) an intergovernmental organization, to coordinate the development and implementation of HIV prevention policy and programs for Member States
  • Collaborate with traditional, cultural, and religious, leaders, to deliver evidence-based HIV prevention messages to their communities of influence
  • Develop and  disseminate tools, best practices, and lessons learned across all areas of BLC work
Practices
Printer Friendly VersionPDF