Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH}Dr. Ihsanullah Shahir (third from left), Director General of Human Resources within Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health, used the Leadership Development Program (LDP) to develop local solutions with local leaders.Photo credit: MSH

Dr. Ihsanullah Shahir, Director General of Human Resources within Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health, began work as a young doctor in mountainous Bamyan province during what he calls “an emergency situation during the war.” In 2004, Shahir became the Provincial Health Director in Bamyan Province. I had limited knowledge, but I got help from colleagues. We established everything from zero. Shahir and his colleagues worked to ensure coverage of the Basic Package of Health Services.

 {Photo credit: International Rescue Committee}Donors give blood in Uvira.Photo credit: International Rescue Committee

When 20-year-old Christine* gave birth at the health center of Kabinda in Uvira in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), she suffered from a ruptured uterus during delivery. The nurse referred her to the Uvira General Referral Hospital (GRH), where health workers confirmed that her life was in danger due to blood loss.

 {Photo credit: Jamshid Noori/SPS Afghanistan}The GPHF-Minilab™ is fully adapted to resource-limited settings as a tool for pharmaceutical quality improvement.Photo credit: Jamshid Noori/SPS Afghanistan

Twenty-five staff from key pharmaceutical regulation stakeholders in Afghanistan completed a comprehensive training in March and April 2015 on the Global Pharma Health Fund’s GPHF-Minilab™ and its use. The GPHF-Minilab is a portable mobile mini-laboratory kit designed for rapid medicine-quality verification and counterfeit medicine detection in resource-limited environments.

 {Photo: Jawad Jalali/Afghan Eyes}Safiullah Sadiq, community health worker and member of the village health council, was interviewed by the LMG-Afghanistan Project in April 2015.Photo: Jawad Jalali/Afghan Eyes

Safiullah Sadiq, a community health worker from the Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, is one of 14 residents who sits on his village’s health shura. (Shuras are councils that engage local leaders, health care providers, and other community members to improve the community’s health.) Sadiq’s village had identified that low utilization of health services was something that they wanted to address. But, the shura hadn’t understood how it could intervene.

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