: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: Wezi Tjaronda}Olavi Shomongula shares his testimony with U.S. Ambassador to Namibia Thomas F. Daughton.Photo Credit: Wezi Tjaronda

A new electronic health tool developed by the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program, implemented byMSH, is being used in more than 50 public health facilities in Namibia. This tool—the Facility Electronic Stock Card (FESC)—has noticeably expedited the dispensing of medication to patients. This was evident when the US Ambassador to Namibia H.E. Thomas F. Daughton visited the Intermediate Hospital Oshakati (IHO), which is in the populous Oshana region in the North-Central part of Namibia.

{Photo Credit: Denise Museminali}Amina, a community health worker, urged Jean Cyiza to take his son Daniel to the Ntoma Health Center for nutritional support after she diagnosed him as severely malnourished.Photo Credit: Denise Museminali

When Daniel was just 11 months old, his mother suddenly passed away from illness. Without her, he was no longer able to breastfeed and gradually became malnourished. In Rwanda, 38 percent of children under five years old experience chronic malnutrition, or stunting.[i] Stunted children tend to perform poorly in school and are less likely to become productive adults In fact, the World Bank Group estimates that malnourished children are at risk of losing 10 percent of their lifetime earning potential.[ii]

{Photo Credit: Denise Museminali}Amina, a community health worker, urged Jean Cyiza to take his son Daniel to the Ntoma Health Center for nutritional support after she diagnosed him as severely malnourished.Photo Credit: Denise Museminali

When Daniel was just 11 months old, his mother suddenly passed away from illness. Without her, he was no longer able to breastfeed and gradually became malnourished. In Rwanda, 38 percent of children under five years old experience chronic malnutrition, or stunting.[i] Stunted children tend to perform poorly in school and are less likely to become productive adults In fact, the World Bank Group estimates that malnourished children are at risk of losing 10 percent of their lifetime earning potential.[ii]

{Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff}Dr. Gabriel Timothé, the Director-General of the MSPP, during the distribution of the PES to the departmental health directors.Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff

In Haiti, it is a core function of the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP)—through its Directorate of Health Service Organization (Direction d’Organisation des services de la santé, DOSS)—to define the set of health services to which every Haitian must have access and to enable and equip health providers and facilities to effectively, equitably, and accountably provide those services.

{Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff}Dr. Gabriel Timothé, the Director-General of the MSPP, during the distribution of the PES to the departmental health directors.Photo Credit: LMG Haiti Staff

In Haiti, it is a core function of the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP)—through its Directorate of Health Service Organization (Direction d’Organisation des services de la santé, DOSS)—to define the set of health services to which every Haitian must have access and to enable and equip health providers and facilities to effectively, equitably, and accountably provide those services.

{Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo}Survivor and subject of story.Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo

Originally published on Rights & Realities blog The FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health, with support from the Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) Humanitarian Sub-cluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages in Mopti to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. This is her account as told to Adama Sanogo/FCI Program of MSH.

{Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo}Survivor and subject of story.Photo Credit: Adama Sanogo

Originally published on Rights & Realities blog The FCI Program of Management Sciences for Health, with support from the Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) Humanitarian Sub-cluster (funded by UNFPA), works with trained village focal points to refer SGBV survivors from 59 villages in Mopti to free medical and psychosocial services at 9 referral hospitals and pharmacies. A 15-year-old client of services, and survivor of familial rape, tells her story. This is her account as told to Adama Sanogo/FCI Program of MSH.

{Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla}Inspecting the water system at Mitundu Rural Hospital.Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla

When a blackout occurred after Pilirani Kabango ended her shift one September evening in 2017, she did not anticipate any unusual consequences. Power outages during this time of year are not uncommon in Malawi, and despite high temperatures and the fact that the rivers supporting electricity generation were drying up, demand for power continues. The three water tanks at Lilongwe’s Mitundu Rural Hospital, where Pilirani works as a nursing supervisor—among the biggest rural public hospitals in Malawi—had a combined capacity of 30,000 liters.

{Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla}Inspecting the water system at Mitundu Rural Hospital.Photo Credit: Chisomo Mdalla

When a blackout occurred after Pilirani Kabango ended her shift one September evening in 2017, she did not anticipate any unusual consequences. Power outages during this time of year are not uncommon in Malawi, and despite high temperatures and the fact that the rivers supporting electricity generation were drying up, demand for power continues. The three water tanks at Lilongwe’s Mitundu Rural Hospital, where Pilirani works as a nursing supervisor—among the biggest rural public hospitals in Malawi—had a combined capacity of 30,000 liters.

{Photo Credit: Julienne Ahua/MSH}Dr Kouadio (with the stethoscope) and her pediatric team at Yamoussoukro Regional Hospital Center.Photo Credit: Julienne Ahua/MSH

"My passion for babies was born from personal experience. I lost my parents at a very early age,” recalled Dr. Kouamé Kouadio, Head of the Pediatric Department at the Regional Hospital Center of Yamoussoukro, the administrative and political capital of Côte d'Ivoire.

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