: Our Impact

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Photo credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Half of children under the age of five in Madagascar are chronically malnourished: 24% suffer from moderate malnutrition and 26% from severe malnutrition, according to the 2012-2013 Millennium Development Goal Survey. Children in rural areas suffer disproportionately because they are often cut off from resources and information, and are typically far from health centers that support family health. Community health volunteers (CHVs) like Grancie Cicie help close the gap.

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

{Photo credit:  Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}Madagascar Health Minister Mamy Lalatiana Andriamanarivo speaking at the USAID Mikolo end-of-project eventPhoto credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

The USAID Mikolo Project has ended after five years of strengthening community health in Madagascar, including improving quality of care and achieving significant gains in maternal and child health. The project held its culminating event in the southwestern town of Tulear on May, 3 alongside representatives from the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and USAID. USAID Mikolo Project Director John Yanulis opened the ceremony, thanking USAID and the MOPH for their tireless collaboration and dedication to the project.  

A mother asks a SILC group for a loan to pay for the treatment of her sick baby.

Throughout Madagascar most families struggle with financial instability. Eighty percent of families work as farmers generating seasonal, unreliable income. In southwestern Tulear II District, the arid climate puts even greater stress on a farmer’s income.

A mother asks a SILC group for a loan to pay for the treatment of her sick baby.

Throughout Madagascar most families struggle with financial instability. Eighty percent of families work as farmers generating seasonal, unreliable income. In southwestern Tulear II District, the arid climate puts even greater stress on a farmer’s income.

A mother asks a SILC group for a loan to pay for the treatment of her sick baby.

Throughout Madagascar most families struggle with financial instability. Eighty percent of families work as farmers generating seasonal, unreliable income. In southwestern Tulear II District, the arid climate puts even greater stress on a farmer’s income.

A mother asks a SILC group for a loan to pay for the treatment of her sick baby.

Throughout Madagascar most families struggle with financial instability. Eighty percent of families work as farmers generating seasonal, unreliable income. In southwestern Tulear II District, the arid climate puts even greater stress on a farmer’s income.

 {Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH}Liberian Minister of Health, Dr Wilhelmina Jallah, address attendees at the eLMIS launch event.Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH

On May 7, the Liberian Ministry of Health (MOH) and the USAID Collaborative Support for Health (CSH) Program launched a new electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS), the culmination of a year-long effort to help streamline pharmaceutical supply chain management in Liberia.

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