: Our Impact

World AIDS Day 2006: Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise. In commemoration of World AIDS Day 2006, the following story provides insight into one of the many ways that MSH is working to mitigate the burden of HIV/AIDS in the developing world. With grants provided by MSH’s Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project and funded by PEPFAR, Khanyiselani Development Trust (KDT) in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa uses ecotherapy (or “nature therapy”) to provide orphans and vulnerable children with vital and high-quality psychosocial support.

World AIDS Day 2006: Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise. In commemoration of World AIDS Day 2006, the following story provides insight into one of the many ways that MSH is working to mitigate the burden of HIV/AIDS in the developing world. With grants provided by MSH’s Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project and funded by PEPFAR, Khanyiselani Development Trust (KDT) in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa uses ecotherapy (or “nature therapy”) to provide orphans and vulnerable children with vital and high-quality psychosocial support.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

World AIDS Day, December 1, 2005Financial management is the Achilles heel for rapidly scaling up civil society's role in mitigating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, especially when the donor community is caught between the "rock" of getting the money out there and the "hard place" of timely and accurate financial reporting to keep the funds flowing.The challenge is to develop innovative agreements and management mechanisms that will get the money out into the community where it can do the most good, without putting an undue administrative burden on either the giver or the recipient.

Expediting the Roll-Out of TB and HIV/AIDS Programs"I have learnt that a laboratory service is the engine oil that lubricates the 'mechanical system' of the hospital, without which the engine breaks down. As a leader, I will ensure that the oil is always available."A participant in Uganda's Laboratory Performance Improvement Program used this metaphor to portray the power of laboratory management teams. These teams have broken through hospital barriers that hinder the roll-out of tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS programs.

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