: Our Impact

Girls at Enjil Comprehensive Health Center, Herat Province. Photo by Julie O'Brien.Building on a strong history of health-system strengthening in Afghanistan, MSH is working with its partners to cut by half the high number of child deaths over the next four years. At the end of Taliban rule, Afghanistan registered one of the worst child health statistics in the world: one child in four died before reaching age five. Although progress has been made—the under-five child mortality rate has dropped by 25 percent since 2003—today only Sierra Leone has a higher rate.

Girls at Enjil Comprehensive Health Center, Herat Province. Photo by Julie O'Brien.Building on a strong history of health-system strengthening in Afghanistan, MSH is working with its partners to cut by half the high number of child deaths over the next four years. At the end of Taliban rule, Afghanistan registered one of the worst child health statistics in the world: one child in four died before reaching age five. Although progress has been made—the under-five child mortality rate has dropped by 25 percent since 2003—today only Sierra Leone has a higher rate.

Girls at Enjil Comprehensive Health Center, Herat Province. Photo by Julie O'Brien.Building on a strong history of health-system strengthening in Afghanistan, MSH is working with its partners to cut by half the high number of child deaths over the next four years. At the end of Taliban rule, Afghanistan registered one of the worst child health statistics in the world: one child in four died before reaching age five. Although progress has been made—the under-five child mortality rate has dropped by 25 percent since 2003—today only Sierra Leone has a higher rate.

On May 27, MSH and the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) hosted “Strengthening Systems to Combat AIDS amid the Global Financial Crisis: What Got Us Here Won’t Get Us There,” a lively discussion among four experts at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. Daraus Bukenya, MSH’s Global Technical Lead for HIV & AIDS/TB, grounded the discussion in an overview of the 30-year history of HIV & AIDS, particularly in Africa, which bears two-thirds of the burden of disease. Dr.

MSH: What is your role at MSH?JN: I am the Country Program Manager for Namibia for the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program. MSH: What is MSH doing in Namibia?JN: MSH is working in Namibia under the centrally funded SPS Program. SPS implements the support of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) to strengthen pharmaceutical systems for the delivery of antiretroviral therapy programs.

MSH: What is your role at MSH?JN: I am the Country Program Manager for Namibia for the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program. MSH: What is MSH doing in Namibia?JN: MSH is working in Namibia under the centrally funded SPS Program. SPS implements the support of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) to strengthen pharmaceutical systems for the delivery of antiretroviral therapy programs.

MSH: What is your role at MSH?JN: I am the Country Program Manager for Namibia for the Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems (SPS) Program. MSH: What is MSH doing in Namibia?JN: MSH is working in Namibia under the centrally funded SPS Program. SPS implements the support of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) to strengthen pharmaceutical systems for the delivery of antiretroviral therapy programs.

When Mustafa (his name has been changed to protect his privacy) came to the hospital to support his HIV-positive sister, Community Care Specialist Callista Ike had no idea that two months later he would be helping to triple HIV counseling and testing rates at his regional hospital in Taraba State, Nigeria. Counseling and testing are vital to stemming the HIV & AIDS epidemic.

After participating in a Community Leadership & Management Program run by MSH, the leaders of Pantasma, Nicaragua came together, despite past political differences, to lay the pipes to bring water to two neighborhoods and raise the resources that brought electricity and a bridge to this rural agricultural community 250 kilometers from Managua. In 2008 the Community Committee in El Charcón No.1 mobilized 120 people to work together, without pay, to lay the 8,168 meters of pipe necessary to bring water to each household.

After participating in a Community Leadership & Management Program run by MSH, the leaders of Pantasma, Nicaragua came together, despite past political differences, to lay the pipes to bring water to two neighborhoods and raise the resources that brought electricity and a bridge to this rural agricultural community 250 kilometers from Managua. In 2008 the Community Committee in El Charcón No.1 mobilized 120 people to work together, without pay, to lay the 8,168 meters of pipe necessary to bring water to each household.

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