: Our Impact

A conversation with Dr. Harrison Kiambati, Head of Technical Planning, Monitoring, and Coordination in the Ministry of Medical Services, and Ms. Judith Aswa, Programme OfficerMSH: What is the role of the Ministry of Medical Services in Kenya? Is it the same as the Ministry of Health?Dr. Harrison Kiambati. Photo by Kenya Ministry of Health staff.JA: The Ministry of Health was split into the Ministry of Medical Services and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation in May 2008 following a power-sharing deal that calmed postelection violence in Kenya.

A conversation with Dr. Harrison Kiambati, Head of Technical Planning, Monitoring, and Coordination in the Ministry of Medical Services, and Ms. Judith Aswa, Programme OfficerMSH: What is the role of the Ministry of Medical Services in Kenya? Is it the same as the Ministry of Health?Dr. Harrison Kiambati. Photo by Kenya Ministry of Health staff.JA: The Ministry of Health was split into the Ministry of Medical Services and the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation in May 2008 following a power-sharing deal that calmed postelection violence in Kenya.

MSH’s Global Technical Lead for Family Planning/Reproductive Health, Dr. Issakha Diallo, opened an international public health conference in Senegal on April 16 by stressing the need for investment in health to drive development. He called public health the “spearhead of economic development and the engine of production.” Using the example of malaria, he linkedIssakha Diallo and members of the media. Photo by MSH staff.

MSH’s Global Technical Lead for Family Planning/Reproductive Health, Dr. Issakha Diallo, opened an international public health conference in Senegal on April 16 by stressing the need for investment in health to drive development. He called public health the “spearhead of economic development and the engine of production.” Using the example of malaria, he linkedIssakha Diallo and members of the media. Photo by MSH staff.

As we approach World Population Day—which was first observed 22 years ago, on July 11, 1988—many women in the poorest countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, still lack access to modern family planning (FP). As a result, these women suffer high maternal mortality, and their infants die at disproportionately high rates. MSH and its partners are leading a response by developing integrated, community-based FP/HIV services in these countries and repositioning FP as a core activity on the global health agenda.

As we approach World Population Day—which was first observed 22 years ago, on July 11, 1988—many women in the poorest countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, still lack access to modern family planning (FP). As a result, these women suffer high maternal mortality, and their infants die at disproportionately high rates. MSH and its partners are leading a response by developing integrated, community-based FP/HIV services in these countries and repositioning FP as a core activity on the global health agenda.

As we approach World Population Day—which was first observed 22 years ago, on July 11, 1988—many women in the poorest countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, still lack access to modern family planning (FP). As a result, these women suffer high maternal mortality, and their infants die at disproportionately high rates. MSH and its partners are leading a response by developing integrated, community-based FP/HIV services in these countries and repositioning FP as a core activity on the global health agenda.

In just a few months, Christianah Temidayo Akerejola—known familiarly as Auntie D—saw the average number of people receiving HIV counseling and testing in her hospitals increase from an average of 10 per day to nearly 100 per day after participating in a Health Professionals’ Fellowship Program sponsored by USAID/Nigeria and designed and managed by MSH’s Nigeria Capacity Building Project under the Leadership, Management, and Sustainability (LMS) Program. Counseling and testing are vital to stemming the HIV & AIDS epidemic.

In just a few months, Christianah Temidayo Akerejola—known familiarly as Auntie D—saw the average number of people receiving HIV counseling and testing in her hospitals increase from an average of 10 per day to nearly 100 per day after participating in a Health Professionals’ Fellowship Program sponsored by USAID/Nigeria and designed and managed by MSH’s Nigeria Capacity Building Project under the Leadership, Management, and Sustainability (LMS) Program. Counseling and testing are vital to stemming the HIV & AIDS epidemic.

CAMBRIDGE, MA — Management Sciences for Health (MSH) will host two auxiliary events and participate in more than ten panels and presentations at the 36th Annual Global Health Council (GHC) Conference. Featuring the theme of “New Technologies + Proven Strategies = Healthy Communities,” this year's conference will host more than 2,500 health professionals from more than 100 countries. MSH will host the auxiliary event “Strengthening Systems to Combat AIDS amid the Global Financial Crisis.” Moderated by Joyce A.

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