: Our Impact

CAMBRIDGE, MA — In response to the devastation from the hurricanes and tropical storms that ravaged Haiti in 2008, the Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) Project received a $5-million expansion from USAID to restore the capacity of SDSH-supported clinics to deliver primary health care services and to provide an improved package of nutrition services to more than 200,000 children under five and nearly 50,000 pregnant women and lactating mothers in the seven communities hit hardest by the hurricanes.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI — Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Haitian Medical Association (AMH), and the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) officially partnered to initiate the donation of 15 anesthesia machines from Mercy Hospital of Florida. The machines, worth US$280,000, were accepted on behalf of the AMH and transported by MSH’s Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) project to the MSPP.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI — Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Haitian Medical Association (AMH), and the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) officially partnered to initiate the donation of 15 anesthesia machines from Mercy Hospital of Florida. The machines, worth US$280,000, were accepted on behalf of the AMH and transported by MSH’s Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) project to the MSPP.

With only 10 miles of paved road in all of Southern Sudan, a region the size of Texas, Steve Redding, Director of Health Service Delivery at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), explains that it is unusual to bump into any sign of government: “There are no roads, mostly cattle trails. Many of the people are seminomadic. . . . To have health facilities positioned along cattle routes reminds people that there is a government concerned with their welfare.” Three years ago, life was different in Southern Sudan.

With only 10 miles of paved road in all of Southern Sudan, a region the size of Texas, Steve Redding, Director of Health Service Delivery at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), explains that it is unusual to bump into any sign of government: “There are no roads, mostly cattle trails. Many of the people are seminomadic. . . . To have health facilities positioned along cattle routes reminds people that there is a government concerned with their welfare.” Three years ago, life was different in Southern Sudan.

With only 10 miles of paved road in all of Southern Sudan, a region the size of Texas, Steve Redding, Director of Health Service Delivery at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), explains that it is unusual to bump into any sign of government: “There are no roads, mostly cattle trails. Many of the people are seminomadic. . . . To have health facilities positioned along cattle routes reminds people that there is a government concerned with their welfare.” Three years ago, life was different in Southern Sudan.

With only 10 miles of paved road in all of Southern Sudan, a region the size of Texas, Steve Redding, Director of Health Service Delivery at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), explains that it is unusual to bump into any sign of government: “There are no roads, mostly cattle trails. Many of the people are seminomadic. . . . To have health facilities positioned along cattle routes reminds people that there is a government concerned with their welfare.” Three years ago, life was different in Southern Sudan.

With only 10 miles of paved road in all of Southern Sudan, a region the size of Texas, Steve Redding, Director of Health Service Delivery at Management Sciences for Health (MSH), explains that it is unusual to bump into any sign of government: “There are no roads, mostly cattle trails. Many of the people are seminomadic. . . . To have health facilities positioned along cattle routes reminds people that there is a government concerned with their welfare.” Three years ago, life was different in Southern Sudan.

MSH: Tell us a little bit about yourself, your background, and how you decided to become a doctor. I went to school here in Nigeria, at the University of Jos. After the basic medical degree, I did a residency in the Faculty of Community Health. I worked briefly teaching medical students Dr. Zipporah Kpamorand then began development work with the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA), starting with expanding access to reproductive health services in the north.

MSH: Tell us a little bit about yourself, your background, and how you decided to become a doctor. I went to school here in Nigeria, at the University of Jos. After the basic medical degree, I did a residency in the Faculty of Community Health. I worked briefly teaching medical students Dr. Zipporah Kpamorand then began development work with the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA), starting with expanding access to reproductive health services in the north.

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