: Our Impact

The World Health Organization’s official recognition of the H1N1 virus as a pandemic this past June focused global attention on the challenge of responding to human outbreaks of zoonotic diseases, which are diseases transmissible from animals to humans. Through work in 49 countries in the past five years, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) has developed a unique multisector approach to assist countries not only in responding to pandemics but also in preventing future outbreaks.

MSH staff reported on the results of projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia, and Rwanda at this year’s meeting of agencies that implement programs funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Windhoek, Namibia, from June 10 to 14. The meeting brought together about 1,500 people from 55 countries to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against AIDS.

MSH staff reported on the results of projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia, and Rwanda at this year’s meeting of agencies that implement programs funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Windhoek, Namibia, from June 10 to 14. The meeting brought together about 1,500 people from 55 countries to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against AIDS.

MSH staff reported on the results of projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia, and Rwanda at this year’s meeting of agencies that implement programs funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Windhoek, Namibia, from June 10 to 14. The meeting brought together about 1,500 people from 55 countries to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against AIDS.

MSH staff reported on the results of projects in Ethiopia, Kenya, Namibia, and Rwanda at this year’s meeting of agencies that implement programs funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in Windhoek, Namibia, from June 10 to 14. The meeting brought together about 1,500 people from 55 countries to share best practices and lessons learned in the fight against AIDS.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) leaders in performance-based financing (PBF) of health services shared their successful experiences from Haiti and Rwanda in a new book from the Center for Global Development, Performance Incentives for Global Health: Potential and Pitfalls.The Haiti team, writing about scaling up a performance incentive model through a network of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), found that rewarding NGOs for increasing access to a package of basic services and paying them for achieving performance targets resulted in significant increases in essential services such as

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) leaders in performance-based financing (PBF) of health services shared their successful experiences from Haiti and Rwanda in a new book from the Center for Global Development, Performance Incentives for Global Health: Potential and Pitfalls.The Haiti team, writing about scaling up a performance incentive model through a network of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), found that rewarding NGOs for increasing access to a package of basic services and paying them for achieving performance targets resulted in significant increases in essential services such as

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) leaders in performance-based financing (PBF) of health services shared their successful experiences from Haiti and Rwanda in a new book from the Center for Global Development, Performance Incentives for Global Health: Potential and Pitfalls.The Haiti team, writing about scaling up a performance incentive model through a network of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), found that rewarding NGOs for increasing access to a package of basic services and paying them for achieving performance targets resulted in significant increases in essential services such as

In a recent survey, a team from the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) and Management Sciences for Health found that human resource (HR) managers in four East African countries—Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda—want and need better preparation to carry out their responsibilities, which include recruitment and deployment of staff, HR planning and policy, and training. The study recommended seeking professionals for these roles and providing short courses in HR management and leadership.

In a recent survey, a team from the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF) and Management Sciences for Health found that human resource (HR) managers in four East African countries—Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda—want and need better preparation to carry out their responsibilities, which include recruitment and deployment of staff, HR planning and policy, and training. The study recommended seeking professionals for these roles and providing short courses in HR management and leadership.

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