: Our Impact

By building latrines, repairing water sources, and providing education about hygiene and environmental sanitation in rural villages and schools in Togo and Niger, Action for West Africa Region–Reproductive Health (AWARE-RH) has contributed to better health for more than 18,000 people. Diarrhea kills about 2 million children every year, largely be-cause they lack clean water and basic sanitation services. In rural Togo, only about 50 percent of the population has access to clean water, and only 17 percent have access to basic sanitation facilities.

By building latrines, repairing water sources, and providing education about hygiene and environmental sanitation in rural villages and schools in Togo and Niger, Action for West Africa Region–Reproductive Health (AWARE-RH) has contributed to better health for more than 18,000 people. Diarrhea kills about 2 million children every year, largely be-cause they lack clean water and basic sanitation services. In rural Togo, only about 50 percent of the population has access to clean water, and only 17 percent have access to basic sanitation facilities.

By building latrines, repairing water sources, and providing education about hygiene and environmental sanitation in rural villages and schools in Togo and Niger, Action for West Africa Region–Reproductive Health (AWARE-RH) has contributed to better health for more than 18,000 people. Diarrhea kills about 2 million children every year, largely be-cause they lack clean water and basic sanitation services. In rural Togo, only about 50 percent of the population has access to clean water, and only 17 percent have access to basic sanitation facilities.

By building latrines, repairing water sources, and providing education about hygiene and environmental sanitation in rural villages and schools in Togo and Niger, Action for West Africa Region–Reproductive Health (AWARE-RH) has contributed to better health for more than 18,000 people. Diarrhea kills about 2 million children every year, largely be-cause they lack clean water and basic sanitation services. In rural Togo, only about 50 percent of the population has access to clean water, and only 17 percent have access to basic sanitation facilities.

By building latrines, repairing water sources, and providing education about hygiene and environmental sanitation in rural villages and schools in Togo and Niger, Action for West Africa Region–Reproductive Health (AWARE-RH) has contributed to better health for more than 18,000 people. Diarrhea kills about 2 million children every year, largely be-cause they lack clean water and basic sanitation services. In rural Togo, only about 50 percent of the population has access to clean water, and only 17 percent have access to basic sanitation facilities.

PATH and the US Coalition for Child Survival are coordinating an initiative to tackle diarrheal disease by inviting leaders in the fields of health, water and sanitation, development and relief, and environmental sectors to sign on to a call to action on diarrheal disease.

PATH and the US Coalition for Child Survival are coordinating an initiative to tackle diarrheal disease by inviting leaders in the fields of health, water and sanitation, development and relief, and environmental sectors to sign on to a call to action on diarrheal disease.

PATH and the US Coalition for Child Survival are coordinating an initiative to tackle diarrheal disease by inviting leaders in the fields of health, water and sanitation, development and relief, and environmental sectors to sign on to a call to action on diarrheal disease.

CAMBRIDGE, MA –In the wake of a devastating civil war in Southern Sudan, USAID has chosen Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to rebuild health services in the country through the leadership of the Sudan Health Transformation Project, Phase II (SHTP II). This three-year, $45-million project will focus on expanding high-impact primary health care and water and sanitation services and increasing the country’s capacity to manage these services, ultimately building a sustainable health infrastructure in the most vulnerable of environments.

CAMBRIDGE, MA –In the wake of a devastating civil war in Southern Sudan, USAID has chosen Management Sciences for Health (MSH) to rebuild health services in the country through the leadership of the Sudan Health Transformation Project, Phase II (SHTP II). This three-year, $45-million project will focus on expanding high-impact primary health care and water and sanitation services and increasing the country’s capacity to manage these services, ultimately building a sustainable health infrastructure in the most vulnerable of environments.

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