: Our Impact

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

It has been over six decades since tuberculosis (TB) was deemed a treatable and curable disease. Yet it still remains one of the leading causes of death across the world, killing more than 1.5 million people per year. Despite myths about its danger, misinformation about its breadth, and ignorance about its true burden on the world’s population, TB remains one of the deadliest epidemics in the world. From low detection rates to drug-resistant strains to the continued threat of co-infection with HIV, we need to recognize just how important this fight is.

CAMBRIDGE, MA — In response to the devastation from the hurricanes and tropical storms that ravaged Haiti in 2008, the Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) Project received a $5-million expansion from USAID to restore the capacity of SDSH-supported clinics to deliver primary health care services and to provide an improved package of nutrition services to more than 200,000 children under five and nearly 50,000 pregnant women and lactating mothers in the seven communities hit hardest by the hurricanes.

CAMBRIDGE, MA — In response to the devastation from the hurricanes and tropical storms that ravaged Haiti in 2008, the Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) Project received a $5-million expansion from USAID to restore the capacity of SDSH-supported clinics to deliver primary health care services and to provide an improved package of nutrition services to more than 200,000 children under five and nearly 50,000 pregnant women and lactating mothers in the seven communities hit hardest by the hurricanes.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI — Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Haitian Medical Association (AMH), and the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) officially partnered to initiate the donation of 15 anesthesia machines from Mercy Hospital of Florida. The machines, worth US$280,000, were accepted on behalf of the AMH and transported by MSH’s Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) project to the MSPP.

PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI — Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the Haitian Medical Association (AMH), and the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) officially partnered to initiate the donation of 15 anesthesia machines from Mercy Hospital of Florida. The machines, worth US$280,000, were accepted on behalf of the AMH and transported by MSH’s Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti (SDSH) project to the MSPP.

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