: Our Impact

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), USAID-Pwojè Djanm, and the Haitian Ministry of Health and Population have sponsored the preparation and recording of Spectacle de Variétés – Ruban Rouge, or Red Ribbon Variety Show, to support World AIDS Day 2007. The show featured numerous Haitian artists, performances, interviews, educational messages, and personal testimonials.

Promoting HIV prevention and reproductive healthAlthough HIV prevalence is declining in sub-Saharan Africa, recent estimates show that 13.7 percent of South African youth under age 20 are HIV positive. In the fight to contain this public health crisis, a critical challenge emerges: what is an effective way to reach the country's young people with relevant and appropriate information on HIV & AIDS and other reproductive health issues?The Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project initiated an innovative peer mentoring program that promises positive impact and sustainability.

Promoting HIV prevention and reproductive healthAlthough HIV prevalence is declining in sub-Saharan Africa, recent estimates show that 13.7 percent of South African youth under age 20 are HIV positive. In the fight to contain this public health crisis, a critical challenge emerges: what is an effective way to reach the country's young people with relevant and appropriate information on HIV & AIDS and other reproductive health issues?The Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project initiated an innovative peer mentoring program that promises positive impact and sustainability.

"Eight months ago, talking about contraception was a taboo. Nowadays people easily talk about birth spacing practice and its importance.

World AIDS Day 2006: Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise. In commemoration of World AIDS Day 2006, the following story provides insight into one of the many ways that MSH is working to mitigate the burden of HIV/AIDS in the developing world. With grants provided by MSH’s Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project and funded by PEPFAR, Khanyiselani Development Trust (KDT) in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa uses ecotherapy (or “nature therapy”) to provide orphans and vulnerable children with vital and high-quality psychosocial support.

World AIDS Day 2006: Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise. In commemoration of World AIDS Day 2006, the following story provides insight into one of the many ways that MSH is working to mitigate the burden of HIV/AIDS in the developing world. With grants provided by MSH’s Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project and funded by PEPFAR, Khanyiselani Development Trust (KDT) in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa uses ecotherapy (or “nature therapy”) to provide orphans and vulnerable children with vital and high-quality psychosocial support.

World AIDS Day 2006: Stop AIDS. Keep the Promise. In commemoration of World AIDS Day 2006, the following story provides insight into one of the many ways that MSH is working to mitigate the burden of HIV/AIDS in the developing world. With grants provided by MSH’s Integrated Primary Health Care (IPHC) Project and funded by PEPFAR, Khanyiselani Development Trust (KDT) in Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa uses ecotherapy (or “nature therapy”) to provide orphans and vulnerable children with vital and high-quality psychosocial support.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

There is growing recognition that health plays a key role in stabilizing and rebuilding the world’s most troubled nations—those that have been ravaged by years of conflict, disease, poverty, and natural disasters.In times of crisis, health systems are battered by violence, poor governance, lack of funding, and loss of infrastructure. Where people no longer have access to adequate health services, mortality and morbidity rates increase dramatically.At MSH we believe that, despite the challenges, societies can move forward and health can be made a top priority.

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