: Our Impact

The BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project hosted a symposium in Washington, DC, on September 30, in which government officials and experts shared their experiences of health care issues in conflict and postconflict states. The symposium brought together eight speakers who discussed the importance of planning; the need to coordinate ministries of health, donors, and nongovernmental organizations; and the importance of linking action to a government’s own national strategies in health and development.

The BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project hosted a symposium in Washington, DC, on September 30, in which government officials and experts shared their experiences of health care issues in conflict and postconflict states. The symposium brought together eight speakers who discussed the importance of planning; the need to coordinate ministries of health, donors, and nongovernmental organizations; and the importance of linking action to a government’s own national strategies in health and development.

The BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project hosted a symposium in Washington, DC, on September 30, in which government officials and experts shared their experiences of health care issues in conflict and postconflict states. The symposium brought together eight speakers who discussed the importance of planning; the need to coordinate ministries of health, donors, and nongovernmental organizations; and the importance of linking action to a government’s own national strategies in health and development.

The BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project hosted a symposium in Washington, DC, on September 30, in which government officials and experts shared their experiences of health care issues in conflict and postconflict states. The symposium brought together eight speakers who discussed the importance of planning; the need to coordinate ministries of health, donors, and nongovernmental organizations; and the importance of linking action to a government’s own national strategies in health and development.

The BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) Project hosted a symposium in Washington, DC, on September 30, in which government officials and experts shared their experiences of health care issues in conflict and postconflict states. The symposium brought together eight speakers who discussed the importance of planning; the need to coordinate ministries of health, donors, and nongovernmental organizations; and the importance of linking action to a government’s own national strategies in health and development.

The Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) has published a new bibliography of 460 articles that will interest to those working in the field of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa.

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

Coptic Waiting in Tent. Photo Credit: MSH StaffOn November 4–6, 2009, in Gisenyi, Rwanda, the Initiative on Adherence to Antiretrovirals of the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs (INRUD-IAA) hosted its third annual meeting on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Results of an INRUD-IAA research study showed that the adherence indicators chosen for study are clinically meaningful—that is, they correlate to increases in patients’ CD4 counts and weight gain.

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