: Our Impact

Ernancy Bien-Aimé, with her arm in a cast, continues to advocate for health services in Haiti. Photo Credit: MSH StaffIn October 2009, Ernancy Bien-Aimé was eager to address health challenges within her community of Cité Soleil, Haiti.  She had just finished a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program (LDP) targeted to youth.

Afghanistan has the second highest maternal death rate in the world, according to the United Nations, with high fertility and low contraception use being significant factors. However, an article recently published by the World Health Organization describes how the Accelerating Contraceptive Use (ACU) project, funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, was able to significantly increase contraceptive use by involving religious leaders in reaching their communities with contraceptives and messages about the benefits of family planning.

Afghanistan has the second highest maternal death rate in the world, according to the United Nations, with high fertility and low contraception use being significant factors. However, an article recently published by the World Health Organization describes how the Accelerating Contraceptive Use (ACU) project, funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, was able to significantly increase contraceptive use by involving religious leaders in reaching their communities with contraceptives and messages about the benefits of family planning.

The most recent Frontlines, a news publication produced by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), features a leadership development program offered by MSH in Kenya. "Kenyan Mothers Choose Hospitals for Births," describes how a chief nursing officer at the Kendu Bay Sub-district Hospital applied management skills she learned in a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program offered by MSH to work with her colleagues to nearly double the hospital delivery rate by 60 percent by creating a "Mothers Club" for local women.

The most recent Frontlines, a news publication produced by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), features a leadership development program offered by MSH in Kenya. "Kenyan Mothers Choose Hospitals for Births," describes how a chief nursing officer at the Kendu Bay Sub-district Hospital applied management skills she learned in a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program offered by MSH to work with her colleagues to nearly double the hospital delivery rate by 60 percent by creating a "Mothers Club" for local women.

The most recent Frontlines, a news publication produced by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), features a leadership development program offered by MSH in Kenya. "Kenyan Mothers Choose Hospitals for Births," describes how a chief nursing officer at the Kendu Bay Sub-district Hospital applied management skills she learned in a USAID-funded Leadership Development Program offered by MSH to work with her colleagues to nearly double the hospital delivery rate by 60 percent by creating a "Mothers Club" for local women.

MSH’s SDSH project (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti—Pwojé Djanm), funded by the United States Agency for International AID (USAID), recently conducted an initial assessment of health facilities in Port-au-Prince. As a result, community-based agents are mobilized and local partners working with SDSH are again providing services to support child health, reproductive health, and the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, primarily HIV and tuberculosis, in 11 areas in the Port-au-Prince vicinity.

MSH’s SDSH project (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti—Pwojé Djanm), funded by the United States Agency for International AID (USAID), recently conducted an initial assessment of health facilities in Port-au-Prince. As a result, community-based agents are mobilized and local partners working with SDSH are again providing services to support child health, reproductive health, and the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, primarily HIV and tuberculosis, in 11 areas in the Port-au-Prince vicinity.

MSH’s SDSH project (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti—Pwojé Djanm), funded by the United States Agency for International AID (USAID), recently conducted an initial assessment of health facilities in Port-au-Prince. As a result, community-based agents are mobilized and local partners working with SDSH are again providing services to support child health, reproductive health, and the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, primarily HIV and tuberculosis, in 11 areas in the Port-au-Prince vicinity.

MSH’s SDSH project (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti—Pwojé Djanm), funded by the United States Agency for International AID (USAID), recently conducted an initial assessment of health facilities in Port-au-Prince. As a result, community-based agents are mobilized and local partners working with SDSH are again providing services to support child health, reproductive health, and the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, primarily HIV and tuberculosis, in 11 areas in the Port-au-Prince vicinity.

Pages