: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

On this World AIDS Day, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) honors those who have been affected by HIV and AIDS and recommits to working with governments, the private sector, and communities to prevent new infections and reach all people living with HIV with high-quality, patient-centered care. As we reflect on our global successes in scaling up HIV prevention and treatment efforts and averting new infections, we stand in solidarity with the many people around the world who are still being denied their right to health.

The Bangladesh Ministry of Health and Family Welfare launched the Zero TB Cities Initiative in Dhaka on October 28, at an event attended by numerous local government and global healthcare leaders, including the U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh, Marcia Stephens Bloom Bernicat, Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH’s) CEO, Marian W. Wentworth, and representatives from the Stop TB Partnership, Harvard Center for Global Health Delivery-Dubai, the International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, and Interactive Research and Development.  

The Bangladesh Ministry of Health and Family Welfare launched the Zero TB Cities Initiative in Dhaka on October 28, at an event attended by numerous local government and global healthcare leaders, including the U.S. Ambassador to Bangladesh, Marcia Stephens Bloom Bernicat, Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH’s) CEO, Marian W. Wentworth, and representatives from the Stop TB Partnership, Harvard Center for Global Health Delivery-Dubai, the International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, and Interactive Research and Development.  

{Photo Credit: UNICEF SYRIA/ ALEPPO, 2016/AL-ISSA.}After years of ongoing conflict, Syrian children face the prospect of a ravaged health system.Photo Credit: UNICEF SYRIA/ ALEPPO, 2016/AL-ISSA.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is helping countries in the Middle East and WHO Eastern Mediterranean region design, finance, and deliver health service packages toward universal health coverage (UHC). Two MSH representatives, David Collins and David Lee, attended a meeting in Cairo recently to discuss the way forward. They presented ideas on health service packages for countries in crisis and how these are necessary to help countries transition from humanitarian health services to long-term, sustainable health systems.

{Photo Credit: UNICEF SYRIA/ ALEPPO, 2016/AL-ISSA.}After years of ongoing conflict, Syrian children face the prospect of a ravaged health system.Photo Credit: UNICEF SYRIA/ ALEPPO, 2016/AL-ISSA.

Management Sciences for Health (MSH) is helping countries in the Middle East and WHO Eastern Mediterranean region design, finance, and deliver health service packages toward universal health coverage (UHC). Two MSH representatives, David Collins and David Lee, attended a meeting in Cairo recently to discuss the way forward. They presented ideas on health service packages for countries in crisis and how these are necessary to help countries transition from humanitarian health services to long-term, sustainable health systems.

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