Malaria: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Overseas Strategic Consulting.}Frank Baraka (left) sews a bed net to use as a fishing net.Photo credit: Overseas Strategic Consulting.

It is 1 p.m. in the village of Kavimvira. The sun is high over Lake Tanganyika, at the foot of the Mitumba Mountain, in scenic Sud Kivu. Frank Baraka has packed the bounty of the morning fishing trip and folded his nets, when his cell phone chimes to signal an incoming text message: “Sleep every night under an Insecticide-Treated Net (ITN), to protect your family from malaria,” he reads out loud, amused, to his fishing companion. 

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)In Guinea, malaria is a common threat year-round, especially during the rainy season that lasts from May to October. It affects everyone, but for children under five years of age, appropriate and immediate treatment could mean the difference between life and death.

Baby Victor and his mother. {Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya}Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya

Around 11 in the morning, mothers start streaming into the health facility. Baby Victor’s mother has brought him today for a routine immunization, but she’s also concerned about his lack of appetite and high fever. The nurses recommend that one-year-old Victor be tested for malaria.Thanks to a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit, Victor’s test results come back in just half an hour.

Malaria continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries, especially in Sub Saharan Africa. In Kenya, malaria alone accounts for 30% of outpatient admittance and up to 5% of inpatient deaths while 170 million working days are lost annually because of it.In 2004, Kenya changed its malaria treatment policy opting for the use of artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria.

Leading child health agencies have joined forces to announce plans to work together on an unprecedented scale to increase access to amoxicillin in dispersible tablet form – the recommended antibiotic treatment for children under five suffering from pneumonia. Download

Management Sciences for Health and its fellow Global AIDS Policy Partnership (GAPP) organizations wrote this letter to US Global AIDS Coordinator Eric Goosby to thank him for the opportunity to provide input for the Blueprint for an AIDS-Free Generation, first announced by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at the 19th International AIDS Conference. The GAPP advocacy community is a unique coalition of civil society groups, implementing organizations, and faith-based groups.

The Grant Management Solutions Project (GMS) invites you to participate in the GMS End of Project Conference! We will highlight five years of results and lessons learned from technical support to grantees of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria in 78 countries.This event will be held Friday, June 29, 2012, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. from 9:00am to 5:00pm.Presenters will include representatives of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria; the U.S. Agency for International Development; and the Office of the U.S.

USAID's regional program, the Amazon Malaria Initiative (AMI), was established to address malaria control in countries that form the Amazon Basin. Initial members included Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru, and Suriname. AMI and its partner organizations helped the countries introduce artemisinin-based combination therapies around 2006 to treat Plasmodium falciparum malaria, which causes the most severe malaria cases.

Congressman Donald Payne. Photo credit: David Gard/The Star-Ledger.Management Sciences for Health (MSH) staff worldwide are saddened at the passing of Congressman Donald Payne. Payne was a great advocate for global health and development assistance for the poorest countries in the world, especially for the people of Africa.For more than 24 years, Mr.

Left to Right: Annick Supplice Dupuy, Deputy Director for Haiti, Population Services International and Diana Silimperi, Vice President, Center for Health Services, MSH (Photo credit: MSH) On Monday, January 30, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and partners held an event to observe the second anniversary of the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti—one of the most devastating to ever hit the island.

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