Malaria: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH}Rasoanirina leading a meeting in her village.Photo credit: MSH

Solange Helene Rasoanirina is an active and motivated member of her community. Along with community health volunteers, the 24-year-old has become a reference for health in Masiakakoho, a remote village in southeastern Madagascar’s Tataho commune in Manakara II district.

 {Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola}National Malaria Control Program and SIAPS staff doing inventory control during a field visit.Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola

In Angola, the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP)’s 2013 annual report suggests that malaria alone represents 35 percent of all curative treatment demands, 20 percent of hospital admissions, 40 percent of perinatal deaths, and 25 percent of maternal deaths. Universal and continuous availability of recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnosis tests (RDTs) are a critical prerequisite for the effective management of clinical malaria.

With thousands of people dying in West Africa from the Ebola virus and many more at risk, Liberia’s Accredited Medicine Stores (AMS) and other drug shops continue to help ensure access to pharmaceutical products and services at the community level even as other health facilities have closed down. They also offer the potential to contribute to the control of the lethal disease that has West Africa and the international community on high alert.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Cecilia tracks medication usage to prevent stock-outs of medicines and supplies at the Kiloleli Dispensary, Mwanza, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Cecilia Lunda has wanted to be a nurse since she was a little girl when her mother, a nurse, sparked Lunda's passion for helping people. As she grew up, Lunda studied hard and made her dream come true—she has worked as a nurse at the Kiloleli Dispensary in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania for four years.

 {Photo credit: Verohanitra Rahariniaina/USAID|MIKOLO.}Justine brings Justina to vaccination day.Photo credit: Verohanitra Rahariniaina/USAID|MIKOLO.

With the signature chubby cheeks and plump thighs of a well-fed, healthy baby, Justina charms the villagers in Mizilo Gare, the small Malagasy commune where she lives. They admire Justina’s good health and consider her mother, Justine, a role model for other mothers in the community.

Dr. Andrew Nyandigisi from the Malaria Control Unit discusses lessons learned in the implementation of DHIS2 with workshop participants. {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

An effective reporting system for health commodities is critical to ensure accountability, enable informed decision making, and provide timely access to information. Using DHIS2 to Manage Data for Malaria Commodities

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Suzanna Tungu, a pharmacy assistant in an outpatient pharmacy at the Shinyanga Regional Hospital in Tanzania. Susanna receives capacity building support and on-the-job training from her supervisor, Luciano Lorde, who was trained by the Tibu Homa project in supply chain management.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Tanzania is among six countries with the highest malaria morbidity and mortality in the world. It is estimated that malaria kills 60,000 to 80,000 of the 10 to 12 million people who fall ill from the disease each year in the country. Children are particularly vulnerable to malaria. Though the overall under-five mortality rate is improving in Tanzania—it declined by 28 percent between 2003 and 2010—it remains high in the Lake Zone at 120 deaths per 1,000 live births, according to the 2010 Tanzania Demographic Health Survey (TDHS).

{Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.}Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.

Malaria is the leading cause of death for adults and children under five in Burundi. One hundred percent of the population in Burundi is at risk of contracting malaria. Despite the efforts of Burundi’s Ministry of Health (MoH), timely access to health care is limited by financial constraints, geographic inaccessibility, and lack of awareness about malaria complications. Community Case Management

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

 {Photo credit: Heidi Yanulis}MIKOLO Project Director John YanulisPhoto credit: Heidi Yanulis

Over 100 guests attended the USAID/Madagascar MIKOLO project launch on December 4, 2013 at the MSH office in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Participants included public health experts in Madagascar, as well as MSH founder, Ron O’Connor. Dr. O’Connor spoke at the launch, as did MIKOLO Project Director John Yanulis and USAID Mission Director Susan Riley, setting the stage for strong collaboration and support from USAID/Madagascar.  

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