Malaria: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Suzanna Tungu, a pharmacy assistant in an outpatient pharmacy at the Shinyanga Regional Hospital in Tanzania. Susanna receives capacity building support and on-the-job training from her supervisor, Luciano Lorde, who was trained by the Tibu Homa project in supply chain management.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Tanzania is among six countries with the highest malaria morbidity and mortality in the world. It is estimated that malaria kills 60,000 to 80,000 of the 10 to 12 million people who fall ill from the disease each year in the country. Children are particularly vulnerable to malaria. Though the overall under-five mortality rate is improving in Tanzania—it declined by 28 percent between 2003 and 2010—it remains high in the Lake Zone at 120 deaths per 1,000 live births, according to the 2010 Tanzania Demographic Health Survey (TDHS).

{Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.}Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.

Malaria is the leading cause of death for adults and children under five in Burundi. One hundred percent of the population in Burundi is at risk of contracting malaria. Despite the efforts of Burundi’s Ministry of Health (MoH), timely access to health care is limited by financial constraints, geographic inaccessibility, and lack of awareness about malaria complications. Community Case Management

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

 {Photo credit: Heidi Yanulis}MIKOLO Project Director John YanulisPhoto credit: Heidi Yanulis

Over 100 guests attended the USAID/Madagascar MIKOLO project launch on December 4, 2013 at the MSH office in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Participants included public health experts in Madagascar, as well as MSH founder, Ron O’Connor. Dr. O’Connor spoke at the launch, as did MIKOLO Project Director John Yanulis and USAID Mission Director Susan Riley, setting the stage for strong collaboration and support from USAID/Madagascar.  

First established in 1974, the Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Association (EPA) has evolved to become one of the strongest and most exemplary professional associations in Ethiopia. Held up as a model, the EPA is the country’s first professional association to develop continuing professional development guidelines that are used nationwide. Recognizing the EPA’s professional capacity to lead the pharmaceutical sector, Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health has actively engaged the association in formulating the country’s health policy.

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. (MSH) will be soliciting expressions of interest (EOIs) in October 2013 from qualified organizations with capabilities and experience in one or more of four technical areas: Governance and Oversight; Program & Financial Management; Procurement & Supply Management; and Monitoring & Evaluation. The regions of interest for this solicitation may include: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), East Africa, West and Central Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Read the full pre-announcement

 {Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman}Dr. Tali Butkap addresses community members during a sensitization meeting in Waru.Photo credit: Dr. Saddiq Abdulrahman

Waru is an underserved and hard-to-reach indigenous community in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) of Nigeria. Until recently, this community did not have a safe waste disposal system and the majority of homes did not have toilets. Residents often dumped their garbage in open fields and defecated in bushes. This haphazard disposal of human waste and garbage caused Waru’s water sources and environment to become contaminated and, in turn, many residents suffered from diarrhea, cholera, intestinal worms, malaria, and typhoid.

"Ihemesi" community in Imo State, Nigeria has a single health center that serves nearly 10,000 residents. Malaria, typhoid fever, and malnutrition are common and many caregivers cannot afford to pay for their children to be treated at the health center. Often the health center would turn away children who could not pay.

{Photo credit: MSH}L--R: Mayowa Joel Communication for Development Centre; Hor Sidua Coordinator of Universal Healthcare for All campaign, Ghana; Dr Stephen Karau, Country Director, AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) Kenya; Arije Adebisi, Director of Communications, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Nigeria; Dr. David Olayemi, Senior Advocacy Manager, Save the ChildrenPhoto credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health (MSH)  joined African civil society organizations (CSOs) at a side event  on July 2 of  the Abuja +12 meeting of African heads of governments. The groups   agreed that universal health coverage should be included in the  post-2015 development agenda.

{Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno}Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno

“Medicine can be poisonous if it is contaminated. It can poison my clients, who will keep returning to the facility. To prevent contamination of the medicines we receive, our facility has invested in proper storage facilities,” says Mr. Andrew Mabele, a clinical officer responsible for screening outpatients, reviewing lab results, and providing HIV and tuberculosis patient follow-up treatment in the Kabichbich Health Centre.

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