Malaria: Our Impact

 {Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH}Local NMCP partners deliver mosquito nets in Liberia during the Ebola epidemic.Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH

"When I arrived in Liberia in early 2014,” says Management Sciences for Health's (MSH's) Kwabena Larbi, senior technical advisor with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), “I found there were a lot of malaria partners—the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), Global Fund, international organizations, lots of NGOs… Each was more or less doing their own thing.”

{Photo Credit: Carole Douglis/MSH}Photo Credit: Carole Douglis/MSH

The explosion of the Zika virus in South America, Central America and the Caribbean has provided more vivid evidence of the urgency to invest in pandemic prevention and preparedness. The virus is spread by the day-biting Aedes aegypti mosquito that also carries dengue and chikungunya viruses. Although it was first identified in 1947, until the 2000s it had been confined to Africa.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Baby Ilunga with his mother, Ruth Mukadi.Photo credit: MSH

Young children at 10 community care sites already benefiting from new study In 2012, malaria was the leading cause of death for children under the age of five in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), accounting for 18 percent of under-five deaths.

{Photo credit: Sara Holtz}Photo credit: Sara Holtz

A recent outbreak has prompted the USAID Mikolo Project, led by MSH, to actively engage in the global fight to eradicate polio in Madagascar. Eight new cases of acute flaccid paralysis, the most common sign of acute polio, were reported between April and May of this year.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Rasoanirina leading a meeting in her village.Photo credit: MSH

Solange Helene Rasoanirina is an active and motivated member of her community. Along with community health volunteers, the 24-year-old has become a reference for health in Masiakakoho, a remote village in southeastern Madagascar’s Tataho commune in Manakara II district.

 {Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola}National Malaria Control Program and SIAPS staff doing inventory control during a field visit.Photo courtesy: SIAPS Angola

In Angola, the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP)’s 2013 annual report suggests that malaria alone represents 35 percent of all curative treatment demands, 20 percent of hospital admissions, 40 percent of perinatal deaths, and 25 percent of maternal deaths. Universal and continuous availability of recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnosis tests (RDTs) are a critical prerequisite for the effective management of clinical malaria.

With thousands of people dying in West Africa from the Ebola virus and many more at risk, Liberia’s Accredited Medicine Stores (AMS) and other drug shops continue to help ensure access to pharmaceutical products and services at the community level even as other health facilities have closed down. They also offer the potential to contribute to the control of the lethal disease that has West Africa and the international community on high alert.

 {Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.}Cecilia tracks medication usage to prevent stock-outs of medicines and supplies at the Kiloleli Dispensary, Mwanza, Tanzania.Photo credit: Brooke Huskey/MSH.

Cecilia Lunda has wanted to be a nurse since she was a little girl when her mother, a nurse, sparked Lunda's passion for helping people. As she grew up, Lunda studied hard and made her dream come true—she has worked as a nurse at the Kiloleli Dispensary in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania for four years.

 {Photo credit: Verohanitra Rahariniaina/USAID|MIKOLO.}Justine brings Justina to vaccination day.Photo credit: Verohanitra Rahariniaina/USAID|MIKOLO.

With the signature chubby cheeks and plump thighs of a well-fed, healthy baby, Justina charms the villagers in Mizilo Gare, the small Malagasy commune where she lives. They admire Justina’s good health and consider her mother, Justine, a role model for other mothers in the community.

Dr. Andrew Nyandigisi from the Malaria Control Unit discusses lessons learned in the implementation of DHIS2 with workshop participants. {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

An effective reporting system for health commodities is critical to ensure accountability, enable informed decision making, and provide timely access to information. Using DHIS2 to Manage Data for Malaria Commodities

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