Malaria: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: William Vasquez}Photo Credit: William Vasquez

April 25 is World Malaria Day, and this year the World Health Organization (WHO) is shining a spotlight on prevention, the cornerstone of malaria control efforts globally. While many countries with ongoing malaria transmission have reduced the burden of this disease significantly, the work is far from over. According to the WHO, in 2015 alone, there were an estimated 212 million new cases of malaria. That same year, malaria claimed the lives of almost half a million people worldwide, mainly young African children.

 {Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH}Yohana sits with his mother near a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan.Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH

Six-year-old Yohana Peter clutched a bottle of mango juice as he waited for his medication outside a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan. Seated next to his mother on a metal bench, Yohana looked anxious. "He had fever and stomach pain. I gave him some medicines at home, but his condition continued to worsen, so I brought him to the hospital to be seen by a doctor," said Asunta Wasuk, Yohana's mother.

Douglas Keene, MSH Vice President of the Pharmaceuticals and Health Technologies, participated on a high-level panel of dignitaries and experts at an international symposium to deliberate the key dimensions of sustainability for seasonal malaria chemoprevention.

 {<a href="http://siapsprogram.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Guatemala_CV_Afiche_FINAL_R1.pdf">USAID SIAPS</a>}Identifying, Treating, and Preventing Malaria: a poster for community volunteersUSAID SIAPS

In Guatemala, a network of community volunteers who diagnose and treat malaria in their communities are mainstays of the Ministry of Health’s malaria strategy to ensure timely access to appropriate treatment, a key strategy to eliminate malaria. However, an assessment identified weaknesses in the volunteers’ management of antimalarials and diagnostic supplies.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

 {Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH}Local NMCP partners deliver mosquito nets in Liberia during the Ebola epidemic.Photo: Kwabena Larbi/MSH

"When I arrived in Liberia in early 2014,” says Management Sciences for Health's (MSH's) Kwabena Larbi, senior technical advisor with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), “I found there were a lot of malaria partners—the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), Global Fund, international organizations, lots of NGOs… Each was more or less doing their own thing.”

{Photo Credit: Carole Douglis/MSH}Photo Credit: Carole Douglis/MSH

The explosion of the Zika virus in South America, Central America and the Caribbean has provided more vivid evidence of the urgency to invest in pandemic prevention and preparedness. The virus is spread by the day-biting Aedes aegypti mosquito that also carries dengue and chikungunya viruses. Although it was first identified in 1947, until the 2000s it had been confined to Africa.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Baby Ilunga with his mother, Ruth Mukadi.Photo credit: MSH

Young children at 10 community care sites already benefiting from new study In 2012, malaria was the leading cause of death for children under the age of five in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), accounting for 18 percent of under-five deaths.

{Photo credit: Sara Holtz}Photo credit: Sara Holtz

A recent outbreak has prompted the USAID Mikolo Project, led by MSH, to actively engage in the global fight to eradicate polio in Madagascar. Eight new cases of acute flaccid paralysis, the most common sign of acute polio, were reported between April and May of this year.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Rasoanirina leading a meeting in her village.Photo credit: MSH

Solange Helene Rasoanirina is an active and motivated member of her community. Along with community health volunteers, the 24-year-old has become a reference for health in Masiakakoho, a remote village in southeastern Madagascar’s Tataho commune in Manakara II district.

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