Malaria: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: Santita Ngo/MSH}Senior Technical Advisor for Supply Chain Management in Cote d'Ivoire, Ghislaine Djidjoho during an annual Leadership, Management, and Governance/National Malaria Control Program coordination meeting in November 2016.Photo Credit: Santita Ngo/MSH

In the global fight against malaria, National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs) play a central role in leading national-level malaria control efforts. For NMCPs to fulfill this role, both the individual NMCP staff members and NMCPs as organizations must have the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes to successfully lead, coordinate, and manage malaria control efforts at all levels of the health system.

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina}Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

The entire population of Madagascar is at risk for malaria, and severe malaria is among the top five causes of death in the country, especially among young children, for whom the disease is a major killer of Malagasy children under five years of age. In this age group the national mortality rate is 7 percent, though this rate varies throughout Madagascar’s 22 regions; ranging from less than 1 percent in the central highlands to almost 11 percent in the coastal regions.

Fanamamy Retsilaky receives a prize from the Ministry of Public Health for his contribution to the fight against malaria.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina.

Madagascar has seen a strong upsurge in malaria cases over the past two years, particularly in the southwest, despite the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH)’s eradication efforts. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes seem almost invincible despite the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor spraying. As a result, communities have become more engaged in prevention activities in order to protect themselves from the deadly disease.

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

Erik Schouten

In 2011, Malawi implemented an ambitious and pioneering “test-and-treat” HIV strategy for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Erik Schouten, MSH's Country Lead and Project Director of  the District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery Project in Malawi, supported the roll-out of the program.

{Photo Credit: William Vasquez}Photo Credit: William Vasquez

April 25 is World Malaria Day, and this year the World Health Organization (WHO) is shining a spotlight on prevention, the cornerstone of malaria control efforts globally. While many countries with ongoing malaria transmission have reduced the burden of this disease significantly, the work is far from over. According to the WHO, in 2015 alone, there were an estimated 212 million new cases of malaria. That same year, malaria claimed the lives of almost half a million people worldwide, mainly young African children.

 {Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH}Yohana sits with his mother near a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan.Photo Credit: Abraham Ayuen/MSH

Six-year-old Yohana Peter clutched a bottle of mango juice as he waited for his medication outside a pharmacy at Al Sabah Children's Hospital in Juba, South Sudan. Seated next to his mother on a metal bench, Yohana looked anxious. "He had fever and stomach pain. I gave him some medicines at home, but his condition continued to worsen, so I brought him to the hospital to be seen by a doctor," said Asunta Wasuk, Yohana's mother.

Douglas Keene, MSH Vice President of the Pharmaceuticals and Health Technologies, participated on a high-level panel of dignitaries and experts at an international symposium to deliberate the key dimensions of sustainability for seasonal malaria chemoprevention.

 {<a href="http://siapsprogram.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Guatemala_CV_Afiche_FINAL_R1.pdf">USAID SIAPS</a>}Identifying, Treating, and Preventing Malaria: a poster for community volunteersUSAID SIAPS

In Guatemala, a network of community volunteers who diagnose and treat malaria in their communities are mainstays of the Ministry of Health’s malaria strategy to ensure timely access to appropriate treatment, a key strategy to eliminate malaria. However, an assessment identified weaknesses in the volunteers’ management of antimalarials and diagnostic supplies.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

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