Malaria: Our Impact

Principal Dispenser and MTC Secretary, David Ouma in the Moroto regional referral hospital medicines stores

Malaria is the leading cause of outpatient visits in Uganda (Ministry of Health, Annual Health Sector Performance Report, 2015/2016), and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are crucial for reducing preventable deaths, lowering the risk of resistance to antimalarial medicines, and decreasing medicine wastage and misuse. 

 {Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH}A USAID Mikolo-supported Community Health Volunteer makes a home visit.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina/MSH

Madagascar experienced a surge in malaria cases in 2015, particularly in the southwestern regions, despite the Ministry of Public Health’s efforts to combat the disease. Interventions such as insecticide-treated bednet distributions and indoor spraying proved insufficient to deal with malaria in rural areas.

 {Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH}Liberian Minister of Health, Dr Wilhelmina Jallah, address attendees at the eLMIS launch event.Photo Credit: Gashaw Shiferaw/MSH

On May 7, the Liberian Ministry of Health (MOH) and the USAID Collaborative Support for Health (CSH) Program launched a new electronic logistics management information system (eLMIS), the culmination of a year-long effort to help streamline pharmaceutical supply chain management in Liberia.

On March 22 and 23, stakeholders from a number of global organizations (NGOs, USAID, Ministries of Health [MOHs], and others) met at a symposium in Washington, DC, to discuss progress and future capabilities of DHIS 2, the open-source web platform that helps governments and organizations collect, manage, and analyze health data.

Photo: From left: Johnnie Amenyah of JSI, Gladys Tetteh, Francis Aboagye-Nyame, Dinah Tjipura, and Kwesi Eghan of the SIAPS Program attending the End-of-Program event on March 1, 2018 in Arlington, VA. (Santita Ngo/MSH) On Thursday, March 1, 2018, MSH held an end-of-program event for the USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program.

{Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira}Mama Mawa credits the new iCCM site with saving her children's lives.Photo Credit: Dieudonné Cigajira

Married with two children, Mama Mawa lives in Kalamba, a remote village of 900 people in the health zone of Kitutu, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Kalamba experienced four infant deaths from preventable diseases in the three-month period from March 2016 to May 2016. Yet, that was before the installation of an integrated community case management (iCCM) site in the village, under the auspices of the USAID-funded Integrated Health Project Plus (IHPplus).

{Photo Credit: Santita Ngo/MSH}Senior Technical Advisor for Supply Chain Management in Cote d'Ivoire, Ghislaine Djidjoho during an annual Leadership, Management, and Governance/National Malaria Control Program coordination meeting in November 2016.Photo Credit: Santita Ngo/MSH

In the global fight against malaria, National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs) play a central role in leading national-level malaria control efforts. For NMCPs to fulfill this role, both the individual NMCP staff members and NMCPs as organizations must have the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes to successfully lead, coordinate, and manage malaria control efforts at all levels of the health system.

{Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina}Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina

The entire population of Madagascar is at risk for malaria, and severe malaria is among the top five causes of death in the country, especially among young children, for whom the disease is a major killer of Malagasy children under five years of age. In this age group the national mortality rate is 7 percent, though this rate varies throughout Madagascar’s 22 regions; ranging from less than 1 percent in the central highlands to almost 11 percent in the coastal regions.

Fanamamy Retsilaky receives a prize from the Ministry of Public Health for his contribution to the fight against malaria.Photo Credit: Samy Rakotoniaina.

Madagascar has seen a strong upsurge in malaria cases over the past two years, particularly in the southwest, despite the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH)’s eradication efforts. Malaria-carrying mosquitoes seem almost invincible despite the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor spraying. As a result, communities have become more engaged in prevention activities in order to protect themselves from the deadly disease.

A technician tests a child for malaria at a health center in Kinshasa, DRC.Photo Credit: Aubrey Clark

The USAID-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, led by MSH, recently published the results of its activities in eight countries (Angola, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Kenya, Guinea, Mali, and South Sudan) to control malaria.

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