Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health: Our Impact

"Ihemesi" community in Imo State, Nigeria has a single health center that serves nearly 10,000 residents. Malaria, typhoid fever, and malnutrition are common and many caregivers cannot afford to pay for their children to be treated at the health center. Often the health center would turn away children who could not pay.

{Photo credit: MSH/Johanna Theunissen}Photo credit: MSH/Johanna Theunissen

Thousands of children in Lesotho will soon have a brand new pair of shoes on their feet, some for the first time in their lives, thanks to an on-going partnership between Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and TOMS Shoes. 

{Photo credit: MSH}L--R: Mayowa Joel Communication for Development Centre; Hor Sidua Coordinator of Universal Healthcare for All campaign, Ghana; Dr Stephen Karau, Country Director, AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) Kenya; Arije Adebisi, Director of Communications, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Nigeria; Dr. David Olayemi, Senior Advocacy Manager, Save the ChildrenPhoto credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health (MSH)  joined African civil society organizations (CSOs) at a side event  on July 2 of  the Abuja +12 meeting of African heads of governments. The groups   agreed that universal health coverage should be included in the  post-2015 development agenda.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Solar panels being installed at the Mukanga General Reference Hospital.Photo credit: MSH

Surgical lamps. Ultrasound machines. Autoclaves. These are essential pieces of equipment in any hospital, and they all run on electricity. In the remote areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo, electricity is a rare commodity. In Mukanga, a rural health zone in Katanga Province, the lack of electrical power was putting sick people at greater risk of death, says Dr. Kasongo Nkulu, Medical Director of Mukanga General Reference Hospital.

The Head of the Community Development Department led a group of participants during the International Women’s Day rally in Delta State. {Photo credit: Gilbert Ojiakor/MSH.}

In Nigeria, women and girls carry the bulk of the caregiving burden for those infected with HIV and children left vulnerable or orphaned by AIDS. These responsibilities often prevent girls and women from obtaining an education and developing income-generating skills. Compounding these problems are social norms that inhibit girls and women from accessing HIV & AIDS information and services and severely limit their control over their sexuality, thereby leaving them vulnerable to violence and abuse.

ULAT staff discuss the meaning of fatherhood as part of the project's work to build gender awareness. {Photo credit: MSH}

Within the USAID-funded Local Technical Assistance Unit for Health (ULAT) Project in Honduras, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the integration of gender is an important element of our technical assistance.

Justine during a home visit with a father and his son. {Photo credit: MSH}

Justine Mbombo, age 38, lives in a small village called Beya in Kasaï Occidental Province in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), with a population of roughly 520 people. There are more than 100 children under age 5 in Justine’s village, and no doctor. Watching children suffer has affected Justine deeply and moved her to become more involved in the health of her community.“In January 2010, we were affected by a measles epidemic that caused the deaths of many children under age 5.

A woman from the Positive Deviance Hearth program educates women on good nutrition practices. {Photo credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH.}

Living in a wobbly shack with mud walls and a grass roof has not deterred Tushemerirwe Esparanza from becoming a change agent in the fight against child malnutrition in her village of Nantungo, in Lwebitakuli Sub County Uganda. Tushemerirwe has helped teach her home village that balanced nutrition is important for children’s health and development—malnutrition is responsible for nearly 60 percent of infant deaths in Uganda. But spreading that message was not easy for her at first.“When I was starting out, many women despised me.

Momotaung holds Sabelo. {Photo credit: J. Mavudze/MSH.}Photo credit: J. Mavudze/MSH.

In rural Lesotho, Momotaung wakes up early to prepare for a trip to the hospital for her checkup, a hospital two hours away from her home. On her way, she stops to pick up an elderly neighbor’s child, a three-year-old orphan named Sabelo---one of 12 siblings and cousins being cared for by their grandmother. She collects three other children from the village also needing care at the hospital.

Baby Victor and his mother. {Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya}Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya

Around 11 in the morning, mothers start streaming into the health facility. Baby Victor’s mother has brought him today for a routine immunization, but she’s also concerned about his lack of appetite and high fever. The nurses recommend that one-year-old Victor be tested for malaria.Thanks to a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit, Victor’s test results come back in just half an hour.

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