Maternal, Newborn, & Child Health: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: MSH}A nurse in Manika prepares to conduct a group education session on antenatal care, as part of the awareness campaign that helped Brigitte access the care she needed.Photo Credit: MSH

A campaign to promote antenatal care becomes a lifeline for a teenager in need.

MSH Kenya team receives the CICF Award. From left to right: Zoe Hensby (DFID), Spencer Ochieng (MSH Kenya Country Representative), Melissa Wanda Kirowo (FCI Program of MSH), Jamilla Wamwiri (Kenya Progressive Nurses Association), and Boniface Njenga (MSH Country operations Director)

The County Innovation Challenge Fund (CICF) is a five-year program funded by UKAid and implemented by an array of partners to support innovative interventions, products, processes, services, technologies and ideas that reduce maternal and newborn mortality in Kenya.

{Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

How US Foreign Assistance is Making A Difference Uganda has made great progress in controlling the HIV epidemic and increasing access to critical HIV and health services in recent years. Under the Government of Uganda’s leadership and with the support of development partners, such as MSH, Uganda has reached the second of UNAIDS global 90-90-90 goals: 90% of people living with HIV who know their status are on treatment. 

Erik Schouten

In 2011, Malawi implemented an ambitious and pioneering “test-and-treat” HIV strategy for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Erik Schouten, MSH's Country Lead and Project Director of  the District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery Project in Malawi, supported the roll-out of the program.

{Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH}Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH

Mothers are caregivers, educators, leaders and decision-makers. And they are frontline health workers and first responders, safeguarding their families' and communities' health and well-being. Mothers do everything for their families. Even when pregnant, they travel for days, on foot or by boat, to give birth at the nearest health facility. They cradle their sick children as they wait to be seen by a doctor in a crowded hospital. Mothers work multiple jobs and save their earnings so they can buy medicines, clothing, food, and school tuition and books for their children.

{Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin}Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin

The Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality working group has written a letter to the editor of The Lancet, which was published in the February 18 edition of the journal. Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Senior Director of the FCI Program of MSH, represents MSH in the working group and co-wrote the letter.

 {Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Nurses from Nseke discuss collected data during their monthly monitoring meetingPhoto Credit: MSH Staff

In the vast, logistically challenging Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), health data are often incomplete, unreliable, or submitted too late to be of use to public health authorities. Health data for the Nseke health area (Kanzenze health zone) seemed at odds with what the health zone management team actually saw on monitoring and supervisory visits. On paper, it looked like the local health facilities were performing well. But community feedback and verification told a different story.

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Noëlla and her healthy newborn baby at the Kabindula health center.Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Noëlla Bitisho, 29, gave birth to her third child at the Kabindula Health Center in December 2015. As with her first two deliveries, this one was challenging, and it looked like there could be complications and possible hemorrhage. Maternal mortality remains high in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), at 846 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to the most recently completed Demographic and Health Survey. Hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death in the country.

 {Photo Credit: Leslie Alsheimer}Nurses at health clinic Virgen del Lourdes Puesto de Salud in Lima, PeruPhoto Credit: Leslie Alsheimer

Catharine Taylor weighs in at STAT on President's reinstatement of Mexico City Policy

 {Photo Credit: Mohammad Hossain/MSH}Tama with her daughter Sangita, who received treatment for potentially fatal, pneumonia-related complications.Photo Credit: Mohammad Hossain/MSH

Tama, a resident of Parokhali village in the Khulna district of Bangladesh, was devastated when her 15-day-old daughter was diagnosed with pneumonia-related complications and needed treatment, including immediate oxygen support. Following instructions from the local doctor, she and her husband rushed their newborn to Khulna Shishu Hospital, situated eight kilometers from her village. Thanks to the oxygen supply system that had been recently installed at the hospital, baby Sangita received a steady flow of medical oxygen and recovered.

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