Family Planning & Reproductive Health: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: MSH}A nurse in Manika prepares to conduct a group education session on antenatal care, as part of the awareness campaign that helped Brigitte access the care she needed.Photo Credit: MSH

A campaign to promote antenatal care becomes a lifeline for a teenager in need.

MSH Kenya team receives the CICF Award. From left to right: Zoe Hensby (DFID), Spencer Ochieng (MSH Kenya Country Representative), Melissa Wanda Kirowo (FCI Program of MSH), Jamilla Wamwiri (Kenya Progressive Nurses Association), and Boniface Njenga (MSH Country operations Director)

The County Innovation Challenge Fund (CICF) is a five-year program funded by UKAid and implemented by an array of partners to support innovative interventions, products, processes, services, technologies and ideas that reduce maternal and newborn mortality in Kenya.

Erik Schouten

In 2011, Malawi implemented an ambitious and pioneering “test-and-treat” HIV strategy for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Erik Schouten, MSH's Country Lead and Project Director of  the District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery Project in Malawi, supported the roll-out of the program.

{Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH}Photo Credit: Carmen Urdaneta/MSH

Mothers are caregivers, educators, leaders and decision-makers. And they are frontline health workers and first responders, safeguarding their families' and communities' health and well-being. Mothers do everything for their families. Even when pregnant, they travel for days, on foot or by boat, to give birth at the nearest health facility. They cradle their sick children as they wait to be seen by a doctor in a crowded hospital. Mothers work multiple jobs and save their earnings so they can buy medicines, clothing, food, and school tuition and books for their children.

{Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin}Photo credit: Jean Jacques Augustin

The Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality working group has written a letter to the editor of The Lancet, which was published in the February 18 edition of the journal. Amy Boldosser-Boesch, Senior Director of the FCI Program of MSH, represents MSH in the working group and co-wrote the letter.

 {Photo Credit: Leslie Alsheimer}Nurses at health clinic Virgen del Lourdes Puesto de Salud in Lima, PeruPhoto Credit: Leslie Alsheimer

Catharine Taylor weighs in at STAT on President's reinstatement of Mexico City Policy

 {Photo credit: APHRC}A peer educator in Viwandani talks about mentorship of young boys in the slum at the video screening.Photo credit: APHRC

The video, Meeting the Needs of Urban Youth, tells the story of adolescents and service providers living in two slums in Nairobi, Kenya, and explores issues around access to sexual and reproductive health services in urban settings. Produced by African Strategies for Health's partners, the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) and Management Sciences for Health (MSH), the video was recently screened at Viwandani and Korogocho, the two communities featured on the film.

{Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH}Photo credit: Catherine Lalonde/MSH

Amy Boldosser-Boesch recalls feeling fortunate to have interned with Family Care International (FCI) when studying for her Master’s in International Affairs at Columbia University. Founded in 1986, FCI was the first international organization dedicated to maternal and reproductive health. Little did she know, in those early days of her career, that she would one day lead the organization.

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Harivelo, a community health volunteer, counsels a young woman on family planning options after her pregnancy test turned out negative.Photo credit: MSH staff

Vololona Razafimanantsaranirina Harivelo has been a community health volunteer (CHV) in the northeastern Malagasy village of Vohitsoa for more than five years. She has impacted the lives of more than 500 people in her community, providing maternal and child health services, including family planning.

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