Tuberculosis: Our Impact

MSH will be participating in the XVIIIth International AIDS Conference being held from July 18-23, 2010 in Vienna, Austria. The 2010 conference theme is “Rights Here, Right Now.” During the week, MSH will be joining the global public health community to continue to push forward expanded access to HIV prevention, care, and treatment.Join us at booth # 477 to learn more about MSH and our projects.

In Malawi where a district hospital can be many miles from a village, rural communities and health centers are playing a vital role in preventing the spread of tuberculosis (TB) in the country. Working with Malawi CAP’s National Tuberculosis Programme, MSH and the Tuberculosis Control Assistance Program (TB) are training community volunteers and strengthening health centers to improve the TB case detection rate and support HIV and TB diagnosis and treatment services.

March 24 is World Tuberculosis Day. Despite significant effort by the global health community to detect and treat tuberculosis (TB), the number of cases is still rising. To control TB and save lives, it is vital to improve detection and treatment in a comprehensive and sustainable way and to strengthen the systems that support detection and treatment. In more than 30 countries, MSH is building partnerships across sectors—internationally, nationally, and locally—to integrate TB services with HIV services and primary health care.

MSH’s SDSH project (Santé pour le Développement et la Stabilité d’Haïti—Pwojé Djanm), funded by the United States Agency for International AID (USAID), recently conducted an initial assessment of health facilities in Port-au-Prince. As a result, community-based agents are mobilized and local partners working with SDSH are again providing services to support child health, reproductive health, and the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, primarily HIV and tuberculosis, in 11 areas in the Port-au-Prince vicinity.

Twenty MSH experts on tuberculosis (TB) from 15 countries showcased the latest global experience and methodologies at the 40th Union Conference on Lung Health, held December 3-7 2009, in Cancun, Mexico.

Andualem Mohammed, SCMS advisor. Photo Credit: Margaret Hartley.MSH: Please tell me about your background and how you became interested in public health. I am from Ethiopia, and I joined Management Sciences for Health (MSH) as an employee seconded to a Missionaries of Charity orphanage for HIV-positive children, where I became the head of the pharmacy. But I wanted an opportunity to help millions of people instead of hundreds, so I joined the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) Project as Quantification and Supply Planning Advisor.MSH: What is your role at MSH?

HIV, tuberculosis, malaria, diarrheal disease, respiratory tract infections—these major killers in the developing world are becoming resistant to the medicines used to treat them. According to the Center for Global Development, the emergence and spread of drug resistance are draining resources and threatening the ability to treat infectious diseases in developing countries. Through international forums and publications, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) continues to spread the word about ways to contain resistance to antimicrobials.In September, Dr. Mohan P.

A school visit to eastern Africa. Photo by Ida Grum. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

In a recent review, the United States Development Agency (USAID) reported that MSH's HIV/AIDS Care and Support Program (HCSP) in Ethiopia, with funding from the President’s Emergency Plan through USAID, has already surpassed many project targets in HIV care and treatment in its first two years.Key results include:45,000 people received antiretroviral (ART) therapy 1.5 million people were counseled and tested for HIV in year two alone100,000 HIV-positive people were enrolled in chronic care 7,000 health care providers and 6,000 community members were trained in HIV care and supp

On October 1, 2009, USAID officially handed over the keys to the newly refurbished and upgraded Central Reference Laboratory (CRL) in Lilongwe, Malawi, to the Ministry of Health in a ceremony attended by representatives from USAID, the Government of Malawi, MSH, the Tuberculosis Control Assistance Program (TB CAP), and other collaborating partners. With the improvements, the CRL is now the first Biosafety Level 3 laboratory based on World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines in Malawi and one of the few laboratories of this level in southern Africa.  According to USAID Charge d&rsquo

 MSH was recently awarded a $60 million five-year follow-on project to the USAID-funded LMS-AIDS Care and Treatment (LMS-ACT) project. Under LMS-ACT (2007-2009), MSH has been assisting the government of Nigeria to take leadership of Nigeria’s HIV & AIDS response at both the federal and state levels, working with the Nigerian government to build the capacity of government health systems, improve health workers’ skills, and take full ownership of providing staff and resources for improved delivery, quality, and sustainability of HIV/AIDS/TB care.

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