Tuberculosis: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan}Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan

Dr. Mohammad Khakerah Rashidi is Country Representative of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Afghanistan and Project Director of USAID's Challenge TB in Afghanistan. Rashidi also serves as First Vice Chair of the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) Afghanistan (Global Fund) and is a Senior Lecturer at Zawul Institute of Higher Education. Earlier in his career, Rashidi says he was the “only medical doctor for more than a million people.” He spoke to MSH about its TB work in Afghanistan in the context of a fragile state.

 {Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH}Representatives from the German Enterprise for International Cooperation (GIZ) facilitating a communications workshop with the Ukrainian Center for Socially Dangerous Disease Control, in partnership with LMG-Ukraine.Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH

In November 2013, Ukrainians took to the streets in Kyiv, claiming Maidan Square to protest corruption and to demand the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement, rejected by the now ex-Ukrainian President Yanukovich.  By the beginning of 2014, the situation reached a boiling point and the riots in Kyiv were turning into full-blown urban warfare.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Tshoeu, skeptical at first, now encourages others to access health care.Photo credit: MSH

The role of community leaders in the response to tuberculosis (TB) in South Africa cannot be overrated. Approximately 500,000 of the country’s residents acquire active TB every year. South Africa also faces treatment adherence challenges, partially due to the stigma associated with TB in communities: nearly one in five patients with multiple‐drug resistant TB do not complete their course of medication.

 {Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH}David Kolang leads a community awareness session on TB.Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates prevalence for all forms of tuberculosis (TB) in South Sudan to be 146 for every 100,000 people.

The online research section of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization (WHO) published the results of a cross-sectional survey aiming to document the prevalence of multidrug resistance among people newly diagnosed with, and those retreated for, tuberculosis (TB) in Malawi.

Working group meeting

To ensure successful treatment and prevention of TB, countries should have strong pharmaceutical management systems to ensure uninterrupted supply of quality anti-TB medicines. Acknowledging shortcomings of the existing TB pharmaceutical management system (TB PM), Uzbekistan’s Ministry of Health (MOH) requested that SIAPS provide assistance and conduct a countrywide TB PM assessment. SIAPS, in collaboration with the WHO Country Office and the TB PM Working Group (created by MOH), conducted the assessment.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

For over a decade, the Government of Ethiopia has been working to improve tuberculosis (TB) screening and has been greatly successful in increasing case detection. Unfortunately, as is too often the case, solving one problem created another: the nation now struggles to maintain an adequate supply of medicine to treat the newly diagnosed patients. Health facilities experience frequent stock outs of anti-TB medications, leaving many patients without treatment for weeks and even months.

 {Photo credit: Rebeka Nigatu/MSH.}Birhanu Weyecha, Ambo Prison Clinic Head, has seen hundreds of inmates become infected with TB and transmit the disease to others.Photo credit: Rebeka Nigatu/MSH.

Ethiopia has the seventh highest TB burden in the world. Out of every 100,000 Ethiopians, 572 are infected with TB. In Ethiopian prisons, this prevalence rate can be three to four times higher due to crowded quarters and insufficient TB control services.  In the three decades he has worked at Ambo Prison as clinic head, Birhanu Weyecha has seen hundreds of inmates become infected with TB and transmit the disease to other prisoners and staff.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}TB CARE I Project Director, Mohammad RashidiPhoto credit: MSH staff.

Last year, "Diwa Sahar's" work with the TB CARE I project in Afghanistan put his life at risk. Although Diwa had conducted dozens of supervision visits to the TB control team in his province, this time he discovered the team’s managers had been stealing project funds.

 {Photo credit: Deus Lukoye/MSH.}Abraham Luutu after TB treatment.Photo credit: Deus Lukoye/MSH.

Tuberculosis (TB) is curable when detected and treated. But many people do not know they have TB. And patients who are diagnosed, often experience debilitating side effects from the medicine (such as nausea and loss of appetite) that lead to malnutrition, poor treatment adherence, and prolonged illness.

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