Tuberculosis: Our Impact

The online research section of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization (WHO) published the results of a cross-sectional survey aiming to document the prevalence of multidrug resistance among people newly diagnosed with, and those retreated for, tuberculosis (TB) in Malawi.

Working group meeting

To ensure successful treatment and prevention of TB, countries should have strong pharmaceutical management systems to ensure uninterrupted supply of quality anti-TB medicines. Acknowledging shortcomings of the existing TB pharmaceutical management system (TB PM), Uzbekistan’s Ministry of Health (MOH) requested that SIAPS provide assistance and conduct a countrywide TB PM assessment. SIAPS, in collaboration with the WHO Country Office and the TB PM Working Group (created by MOH), conducted the assessment.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

For over a decade, the Government of Ethiopia has been working to improve tuberculosis (TB) screening and has been greatly successful in increasing case detection. Unfortunately, as is too often the case, solving one problem created another: the nation now struggles to maintain an adequate supply of medicine to treat the newly diagnosed patients. Health facilities experience frequent stock outs of anti-TB medications, leaving many patients without treatment for weeks and even months.

 {Photo credit: Rebeka Nigatu/MSH.}Birhanu Weyecha, Ambo Prison Clinic Head, has seen hundreds of inmates become infected with TB and transmit the disease to others.Photo credit: Rebeka Nigatu/MSH.

Ethiopia has the seventh highest TB burden in the world. Out of every 100,000 Ethiopians, 572 are infected with TB. In Ethiopian prisons, this prevalence rate can be three to four times higher due to crowded quarters and insufficient TB control services.  In the three decades he has worked at Ambo Prison as clinic head, Birhanu Weyecha has seen hundreds of inmates become infected with TB and transmit the disease to other prisoners and staff.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}TB CARE I Project Director, Mohammad RashidiPhoto credit: MSH staff.

Last year, "Diwa Sahar's" work with the TB CARE I project in Afghanistan put his life at risk. Although Diwa had conducted dozens of supervision visits to the TB control team in his province, this time he discovered the team’s managers had been stealing project funds.

 {Photo credit: Deus Lukoye/MSH.}Abraham Luutu after TB treatment.Photo credit: Deus Lukoye/MSH.

Tuberculosis (TB) is curable when detected and treated. But many people do not know they have TB. And patients who are diagnosed, often experience debilitating side effects from the medicine (such as nausea and loss of appetite) that lead to malnutrition, poor treatment adherence, and prolonged illness.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}A lab technician in the DRC’s Kasaï Oriental Province who received training on HIV-TB co-infection.Photo credit: MSH staff.

People living with HIV or tuberculosis (TB) face many health challenges, but when infected with both of these diseases, their struggles multiply, because each disease accelerates the other’s progression. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is ranked eighth among countries reporting the highest rates of HIV/TB co-infection. To manage the burden of care at such a level, countries must have well-trained staff in a health system that takes an integrated approach to care and treatment.

 {Photo credit: Rita Tumuhairwe/MSH.}Nile Breweries donated 36 cases of water to TRACK TB-supported hospitals. Purified water helps TB patients stay hydrated during treatment. Photo credit: Rita Tumuhairwe/MSH.

Nagayi Efrance became infected with tuberculosis (TB) in 2012. Although she attended local health facilities for treatment, the TB medicine did not heal her and often left her feeling nauseated and unable to eat. When Nagayi tried to take the TB medicine on an empty stomach, she felt even worse. Eventually, she stopped taking treatment and developed multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB), a strain of TB that cannot be treated by first-line anti-TB medicines.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. (MSH) will be soliciting expressions of interest (EOIs) in October 2013 from qualified organizations with capabilities and experience in one or more of four technical areas: Governance and Oversight; Program & Financial Management; Procurement & Supply Management; and Monitoring & Evaluation. The regions of interest for this solicitation may include: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), East Africa, West and Central Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Read the full pre-announcement

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