Tuberculosis: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}A community health worker brings sputum samples she collected during home visits for testing at a laboratory.Photo credit: MSH staff.

Solange Bitondo coughed for a year, but never sought treatment from the Kinkindi health center less than a kilometer from her home. Instead, the 37-year-old mother of three consulted traditional healers, prayed, and self-medicated with herbs and medicines she found in the market. 

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

The average Ugandan woman gives birth to 6.2 children—a national fertility rate that is among the five highest in sub-Saharan Africa—increasing the chances of complicated pregnancies and deliveries. If all unmet need for modern contraceptive methods in Uganda were satisfied, it is estimated that maternal mortality would drop by 40 percent, and unplanned births and induced abortions would decline by about 85 percent. 

 {Photo credit: Berhan Teklehaimanot/MSH}HEAL TB has trained 471 district TB focal persons on identification and management of TB in children in the Amhara and Oromia regions of Ethiopia.Photo credit: Berhan Teklehaimanot/MSH

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that up to 80,000 children die from tuberculosis (TB) each year and that children account for over half a million new cases annually. Unfortunately, global figures likely underestimate the burden of childhood TB worldwide due to missed diagnosis, causing TB in children to be a ‘’hidden epidemic.”

 {Photo credit:  Diana Sharone Tumuhairwe} MDR-TB patients receiving continuous health education at Lira hospital.Photo credit: Diana Sharone Tumuhairwe

Although the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in Uganda is declining, multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB), a strain of TB that cannot be treated with the two most powerful first-line medicines, is a growing concern. This is especially true in Uganda’s Lira district, a commercial hub in the Northern region.

{Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan}Photo credit: MSH staff/Afghanistan

Dr. Mohammad Khakerah Rashidi is Country Representative of Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Afghanistan and Project Director of USAID's Challenge TB in Afghanistan. Rashidi also serves as First Vice Chair of the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) Afghanistan (Global Fund) and is a Senior Lecturer at Zawul Institute of Higher Education. Earlier in his career, Rashidi says he was the “only medical doctor for more than a million people.” He spoke to MSH about its TB work in Afghanistan in the context of a fragile state.

 {Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH}Representatives from the German Enterprise for International Cooperation (GIZ) facilitating a communications workshop with the Ukrainian Center for Socially Dangerous Disease Control, in partnership with LMG-Ukraine.Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH

In November 2013, Ukrainians took to the streets in Kyiv, claiming Maidan Square to protest corruption and to demand the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement, rejected by the now ex-Ukrainian President Yanukovich.  By the beginning of 2014, the situation reached a boiling point and the riots in Kyiv were turning into full-blown urban warfare.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Tshoeu, skeptical at first, now encourages others to access health care.Photo credit: MSH

The role of community leaders in the response to tuberculosis (TB) in South Africa cannot be overrated. Approximately 500,000 of the country’s residents acquire active TB every year. South Africa also faces treatment adherence challenges, partially due to the stigma associated with TB in communities: nearly one in five patients with multiple‐drug resistant TB do not complete their course of medication.

 {Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH}David Kolang leads a community awareness session on TB.Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi/MSH

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates prevalence for all forms of tuberculosis (TB) in South Sudan to be 146 for every 100,000 people.

The online research section of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization (WHO) published the results of a cross-sectional survey aiming to document the prevalence of multidrug resistance among people newly diagnosed with, and those retreated for, tuberculosis (TB) in Malawi.

Working group meeting

To ensure successful treatment and prevention of TB, countries should have strong pharmaceutical management systems to ensure uninterrupted supply of quality anti-TB medicines. Acknowledging shortcomings of the existing TB pharmaceutical management system (TB PM), Uzbekistan’s Ministry of Health (MOH) requested that SIAPS provide assistance and conduct a countrywide TB PM assessment. SIAPS, in collaboration with the WHO Country Office and the TB PM Working Group (created by MOH), conducted the assessment.

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