HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

John Tiva Joseph. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

USAID-funded PEPFAR Health Professionals Fellow and laboratory scientist, John Tiva Joseph, returned home from his training determined to improve HIV diagnostic services at his laboratory. Joseph shared what he learned as a PEPFAR Fellow with his antiretroviral therapy (ART) team at General Hospital, Michika, in Adamawa State, Nigeria.

Dr. Catherine Mundy.Dr. Catherine Mundy.

Laboratory services are a necessary but sometimes neglected element of a strong health system. From disease control and surveillance to patient diagnosis and care, laboratories are central to public health. Where laboratory services, policies or strategy are lacking, a comprehensive systems approach can improve a nation's infrastructure and capacity to manage and finance laboratory systems.MSH spoke with Dr.

To improve access to laboratory testing, supervision and quality  assurance, Management Sciences for Health’s (MSH) Strengthening Public  Health Laboratory Systems Project in Kenya -- funded by PEPFAR  (President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief) through the Centers for  Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- is supporting the Kenyan Ministry of Health (MOH) in strengthening the national laboratory referral networks. Health services in Kenya are structured into four hierarchical levels  of care: dispensary, health center, district and provincial or na

A Malawian woman receives a Depo-Provera injection through the CFPHS project. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Since 2007, the USAID-funded Community-based Family Planning and HIV & AIDS Services (CFPHS) project has partnered with the ministry of health and local organizations in Malawi to expand access to integrated family planning and HIV & AIDS services in rural areas through a network of community health workers.The CFPHS project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), has had marked success, increasing contraceptive use from 20,000 to 39,000 couples in two years.A 2004 health survey in Malawi showed that the contraceptive method of choice for about 60 percent of married women was the

Ekundayo Aigbomian, Associate Director of Community HIV Services and Gender for ProACT. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

The Prevention and Organizational Systems – AIDS Care and Treatment project (ProACT Nigeria) is a five-year, USAID-funded, MSH-led project that began in 2009. ProACT supports HIV & AIDS services in six Nigerian states by building the capacity of government and civil society to strengthen the health system as a whole.

When a parent dies from AIDS, the children left behind often suffer not only the loss of a loved one, but also the loss of financial support, making daily survival a challenge and education a dream. USAID’s Community Based Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (CUBS) Project, led by MSH and Africare, is providing assistance to the communities that support these children in 11 Nigerian states.

The MSH-led, US Agency for International Development- funded, AIDSTAR-Two Project has published a new technical brief, Systematic Organizational Capacity Building: Tackling Planning and Implementation Challenges, which focuses on the barriers associated with capacity building that are faced by civil society and non-governmental organizations in the context of HIV & AIDS programming.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) held its HIV/AIDS Care and Support Program (HCSP) End of Program Review Meeting in May in Addis Ababa. The meeting highlighted progress and achievements of the program since its start in June 2007. The U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) provided funding for the program managed by USAID with implementing partner Management Sciences for Health (MSH).The program targeted Addis Ababa City Administration and the four regions of Amhara, Oromia, SNNPR, and Tigray.

Haile Wubneh, Deputy Chief of Party, Care and Support Program. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Ethiopia is the oldest independent country in Africa.

Busia District in Eastern Uganda has a population of about 250,000 people, 83% of who live in rural villages. HIV prevalence in the district is three times higher than the national prevalence of 6.4%. STAR-E, a project funded by US Agency for International Development and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), is working in the district’s health facilities and in the community to address these health indicators.

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