HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

HIV and AIDS patients worldwide depend on lifesaving drugs to extend their lives and improve their quality of life. In Ethiopia, where an estimated 2.2 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, access to these lifesaving medicines, particularly for people living outside of the capital city, means depending on an efficient and effective pharmaceutical supply chain to get the medicines to keep them alive.

Management Sciences for Health, Inc. (MSH) will be soliciting expressions of interest (EOIs) in October 2013 from qualified organizations with capabilities and experience in one or more of four technical areas: Governance and Oversight; Program & Financial Management; Procurement & Supply Management; and Monitoring & Evaluation. The regions of interest for this solicitation may include: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA), East Africa, West and Central Africa, Southern Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Read the full pre-announcement

 {Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare}Nigerian woman.Photo by Akintunde Akinleye, courtesy of Photoshare

Management Sciences for Health’s Nigeria Program to build Leadership and Accountability in Nigeria's Health System (PLAN-Health) supported the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) Health and Human Services Secretariat of the Health Planning, Research and Statistics department to develop an eHealth policy. The eHealth policy is a set of principles and actions to guide implementation of healthcare practices supported by electronic processes and communication, including the use of health applications on mobile phones.

{Photo credit: Todd Shapera}Photo credit: Todd Shapera

Word is spreading in Zambia: one simple procedure can reduce a man’s risk of HIV infection by a shocking 60 percent. Young men have heard this news at school and older men at their workplaces. The nurses are talking about it during clinic appointments and community leaders at village gatherings.  One man says he had the procedure done and is now encouraging his friends to try it. 

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Throughout Côte d'Ivoire, more than 110,000 HIV & AIDS patients receive anti-retroviral drugs. These patients rely on a smoothly functioning supply chain that allows medicines to reach local health centers in a timely manner. When recent assessments identified that many sites within the country were not receiving drugs as scheduled, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), managed by Management Sciences for Health in Côte d'Ivoire, began identifying challenges and mobilizing solutions.

{Photo credit: Musa Usman/MSH Nigeria}Caregivers sorting by-products during oil production.Photo credit: Musa Usman/MSH Nigeria

Nigeria is home to nearly two million AIDS orphans. Providing for these children is challenging for the nation’s many impoverished residents and communities. Without proper care and support, vulnerable children often face discrimination, neglect, abandonment, malnutrition, abuse, trafficking, and forced labor.

{Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH}Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH

Living with her unemployed husband, 10-month-old son, and 8-year-old HIV-positive daughter, Mearg felt that life was hopeless before joining a Mothers' Support Group (MSG) at Korem Health Center in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. But membership in the MSG, complemented by participation in her community’s association for people living with HIV, helped her regain self-esteem.

Ummuro Adano

Donors, national governments, civil society, and international partners are grappling with three realities in the domain of HIV and AIDS today: (1) the need to accelerate country ownership and leadership of HIV and AIDS programming; (2) diminishing donor resources; and (3) the need to strengthen local implementing organizations and institutions to sustain the AIDS response in terms of: access to prevention, treatment, care, and support services; addressing stigma, discrimination and human rights abuses that key populations continue to face in many parts of the world; and supporting orphan

{Photo credit: Glenn Ruga/MSH, Uganda.}Photo credit: Glenn Ruga/MSH, Uganda.

After much anticipation, the USAID-funded Strengthening TB and AIDS Response – Eastern Region (STAR-E) project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), has begun supporting the roll out of the Option B+ treatment program in Uganda.

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