HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Throughout Côte d'Ivoire, more than 110,000 HIV & AIDS patients receive anti-retroviral drugs. These patients rely on a smoothly functioning supply chain that allows medicines to reach local health centers in a timely manner. When recent assessments identified that many sites within the country were not receiving drugs as scheduled, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), managed by Management Sciences for Health in Côte d'Ivoire, began identifying challenges and mobilizing solutions.

{Photo credit: Musa Usman/MSH Nigeria}Caregivers sorting by-products during oil production.Photo credit: Musa Usman/MSH Nigeria

Nigeria is home to nearly two million AIDS orphans. Providing for these children is challenging for the nation’s many impoverished residents and communities. Without proper care and support, vulnerable children often face discrimination, neglect, abandonment, malnutrition, abuse, trafficking, and forced labor.

{Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH}Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH

Living with her unemployed husband, 10-month-old son, and 8-year-old HIV-positive daughter, Mearg felt that life was hopeless before joining a Mothers' Support Group (MSG) at Korem Health Center in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. But membership in the MSG, complemented by participation in her community’s association for people living with HIV, helped her regain self-esteem.

Ummuro Adano

Donors, national governments, civil society, and international partners are grappling with three realities in the domain of HIV and AIDS today: (1) the need to accelerate country ownership and leadership of HIV and AIDS programming; (2) diminishing donor resources; and (3) the need to strengthen local implementing organizations and institutions to sustain the AIDS response in terms of: access to prevention, treatment, care, and support services; addressing stigma, discrimination and human rights abuses that key populations continue to face in many parts of the world; and supporting orphan

{Photo credit: Glenn Ruga/MSH, Uganda.}Photo credit: Glenn Ruga/MSH, Uganda.

After much anticipation, the USAID-funded Strengthening TB and AIDS Response – Eastern Region (STAR-E) project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), has begun supporting the roll out of the Option B+ treatment program in Uganda.

{Photo credit: MSH/Johanna Theunissen}Photo credit: MSH/Johanna Theunissen

Thousands of children in Lesotho will soon have a brand new pair of shoes on their feet, some for the first time in their lives, thanks to an on-going partnership between Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and TOMS Shoes. 

{Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno}Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno

“Medicine can be poisonous if it is contaminated. It can poison my clients, who will keep returning to the facility. To prevent contamination of the medicines we receive, our facility has invested in proper storage facilities,” says Mr. Andrew Mabele, a clinical officer responsible for screening outpatients, reviewing lab results, and providing HIV and tuberculosis patient follow-up treatment in the Kabichbich Health Centre.

Mr. Sello Lechesa, a pharmacy technician and RxSolution user in the ART pharmacy at Maluti Adventist Hospital. {Photo credit: MSH staff/Lesotho}Photo credit: MSH staff/Lesotho

Lesotho’s pharmaceutical sector faced two formidable challenges: the unreliable supply of essential medicines and the unknown quality of medicines circulating in the country. Inefficiencies within the supply chain system were at the root of both problems, specifically weak information management systems that did not support decision-making in the supply chain.

Juan-Carlos Alegre

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems have played a critical role in advancing the field of global health, from applying quantitative and qualitative methods in collecting and using health data, to informing decision making, applying rigorous evaluations in assessing program effectiveness, and designing and conducting operational research that address implementation challenges.

How do you measure the overall health of an organization? Evaluating a person’s health is relatively easy – doctors around the world agree on the basic concepts of physical health, and measurements and standards have been well established for “ideal” height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and other components of health.

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