HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.}After being widowed in 2008, CUBS helped Bridget Egesi start a pharmacy so she could earn an income to suport her five children.Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.

Forty-year-old Bridget Egesi has been the sole caretaker of her five children since her husband’s death in 2008. Until recently, Bridget pieced together an income by washing laundry, cleaning her neighbors’ cars, and working as a security guard.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Religious leaders privately counsel HIV patients outside Teklehaimanot Monastery.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

When Berhe Menaso’s wife passed away seven years back, he was faced with the challenge of raising their eight children by himself. But he was sick and too weak to work on his small farm at the time, and his youngest daughter, then only 3 years old, was also very sick. So one early morning he woke his daughter and they went together to the hospital for a checkup. They learned that they were both HIV positive. Based on the advice given to him at the health center, he then brought his seven older children to the hospital for HIV testing and found that they were all HIV negative.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Dr. Rafida, a pharmacist at Coast Provincial General Hospital, enters patient information into the ADT pharmacy management software.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

“My wife was the first to discover her status. After giving birth, she started feeling unwell and […] tested positive for HIV,” says Mzee Ahmed*, who later learned his son, Juma, was also HIV positive. “After learning my wife’s status, it took me awhile to get tested but I eventually got the courage to get tested. The test was positive and I was also put on antiretroviral treatment,” explains Ahmed. Six years later, they all remain on their antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimens and visit health facilities regularly to refill their ARV prescriptions.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Teberih Tsegay, Almaz Haile, Jember Alemayehu, and Yeshi Derebew, of Korem Town, Ethiopia.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

"Some years back there was no one to teach us, so we gave birth to HIV-positive children. But now we can teach others so no child will be born with the virus," says Jember, a mother mentor at Korem Health Center in Tigray, Ethiopia. Four HIV-positive women, Teberih Tsegay, Almaz Haile, Jember Alemayehu, and Yeshi Derebew, envisioning that no child be born with HIV in their town, started to work as mother mentors at Korem Health Center to achieve their vision.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

 {Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH}Joseph Borgelain inserts the cartridge into the PIMA machine to perform a rapid CD4 test for Paul.Photo credit: Aurélie Jousset/MSH

Two-year-old Paul had been sick for several days. On October 12, 2013, his aunt Marie brought him to the Jules Fleury Hospital in the Nippes department of Haiti. Two weeks prior, Paul’s mother, who is HIV-positive, had left for Port-au-Prince in search of work, leaving Paul in the care of his aunt.

First established in 1974, the Ethiopian Pharmaceutical Association (EPA) has evolved to become one of the strongest and most exemplary professional associations in Ethiopia. Held up as a model, the EPA is the country’s first professional association to develop continuing professional development guidelines that are used nationwide. Recognizing the EPA’s professional capacity to lead the pharmaceutical sector, Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health has actively engaged the association in formulating the country’s health policy.

MSH's Global Technical Lead for HIV and AIDS, Scott Kellerman, has co-edited a 12-paper special supplement on pediatric HIV and AIDS for the journal AIDS. Dr. Nandita Sugandhi from CHAI and Dr. Rami Yogev from Northwestern University Department of Pediatrics were also co-editors. The series was initiated last year because of concerns that key issues in pediatric HIV and AIDS were being overlooked, such as case findings for children missed by PMTCT; linkage, retention and adherence to care for infected children; and the growing cohort of HIV-exposed and uninfected children.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Genfo, an Ethiopian porridge especially prepared for women to help them recover after delivering a baby.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

In Ethiopia, pregnant women eagerly await the traditional birth ceremony accompanying their delivery as much as they wait for their baby. In anticipation of the birth, the expectant mother and her friends celebrate together: dancing special dances and tasting distinctive foods that the mother will eat after her baby is born, such as genfo, an Ethiopian porridge. During delivery, the mother’s friends and family prepare a coffee ceremony, burn incense, and make genfo.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Aba Gebrekidan visiting Miliat and her family.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

“How can a person go into the sea, and come out without getting wet?” asks Likebirihanat Aba Gebrekidan Gebregiorgis during a training of religious leaders in August 2012, held in Tigray, Ethiopia. His question refers to his belief that medical treatment and divine intervention together can ensure a healthy child is born to HIV-positive parents.

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