HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: MSH}Staff at the new HTC site in Bvumbwe Prison test an inmate for HIV.Photo credit: MSH

In 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated a program designed to improve the quality, access, and coverage of health services related to HIV in seven districts of Malawi. The Service Delivery Quality Improvement and Health Systems Strengthening project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), works with local stakeholders to this end, including improving HIV prevention and care at prisons in these seven districts.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.

A project of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) is led by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) established a local field office in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in early 2013. As one of the most recent additions to the SCMS global portfolio of countries, the local staff of five has sought to scale up and produce results extremely quickly. SCMS’ primary mandate in the DRC is to supply the HIV commodities needed by six PEPFAR implementing partners that are spread across four of the DRC’s eleven provinces. These six implementing partners provide care to some of the most at-need populations within the DRC. They have set ambitious treatment targets and depend on SCMS to deliver the commodities that will allow them to meet those needs. The commodities supplied by SCMS range from antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to antibiotics needed to treat opportunistic infections, lab equipment, supplies and test kits. This year, 22,514 Congolese people will receive treatment with ARVs supplied by SCMS.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

 {Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH}SIAPS West Africa Regional Program launches, April 2014.Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH

Antiretroviral (ARV) medicines are a matter of life or death for people who are HIV-positive.  In West Africa, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) is working to make sure people have uninterrupted access to these life-saving medicines.

 {Photo credit: Moroesi Makhetha/GROW.}A health worker weighing a child, Mokhotlong district, Lesotho.Photo credit: Moroesi Makhetha/GROW.

More than 180,000 vulnerable children in Lesotho, a mountainous country, are in need of essential services such as health care, access to education, and psychosocial support. Nutritional deficiencies and conditions are a challenge because of widespread poverty, food insecurity, and inadequate access to services. In addition, community health workers, health facilities, and local civil society organizations sometimes lack basic equipment to assess child nutritional status.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}A lab technician in the DRC’s Kasaï Oriental Province who received training on HIV-TB co-infection.Photo credit: MSH staff.

People living with HIV or tuberculosis (TB) face many health challenges, but when infected with both of these diseases, their struggles multiply, because each disease accelerates the other’s progression. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is ranked eighth among countries reporting the highest rates of HIV/TB co-infection. To manage the burden of care at such a level, countries must have well-trained staff in a health system that takes an integrated approach to care and treatment.

 {Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.}A health worker in Namibia using the Electronic Dispensing Tool (EDT).Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.

When a pharmaceutical information management tool was adopted in Namibia, not only did its functionality improve health service delivery, but it also eased the burden on healthcare workers. Although HIV incidence is dropping, roughly 13 percent of adults in Namibia were infected with HIV in 2012. In some areas of the country, however, prevalence is much higher. In the Oshana region, about 28 percent of adults were living with HIV in 2010.

 {Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.}Dorothy Onyango, founder and executive director of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK), talks with MSH about WOFAK, her role as a leader and mentor, and how women are contributing to moving towards an AIDS-free generation.Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.

In Kenya, civil society organizations are on the frontline of health service delivery at the community level. At least 50 percent of healthcare services to communities in Kenya are provided through the nongovernmental sector, which is made up primarily of civil society organizations.

 {Photo credit: STAR-E staff/MSH}Lydia attends to a patient at Busia Health Center.Photo credit: STAR-E staff/MSH

Ms. Lydia Nakalyango is the only midwife on staff during the day at the Maternal and Child Health Department of Busia Health Center IV, which serves not just their own municipality, but clients from neighboring Kenya as well. Lydia takes care of antenatal clients while also paying attention to the labor ward for any mothers delivering. She is also on standby to care for new babies referred for early infant diagnosis.

 {Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.}After being widowed in 2008, CUBS helped Bridget Egesi start a pharmacy so she could earn an income to suport her five children.Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.

Forty-year-old Bridget Egesi has been the sole caretaker of her five children since her husband’s death in 2008. Until recently, Bridget pieced together an income by washing laundry, cleaning her neighbors’ cars, and working as a security guard.

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