HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Moroesi Makhetha/GROW.}A health worker weighing a child, Mokhotlong district, Lesotho.Photo credit: Moroesi Makhetha/GROW.

More than 180,000 vulnerable children in Lesotho, a mountainous country, are in need of essential services such as health care, access to education, and psychosocial support. Nutritional deficiencies and conditions are a challenge because of widespread poverty, food insecurity, and inadequate access to services. In addition, community health workers, health facilities, and local civil society organizations sometimes lack basic equipment to assess child nutritional status.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}A lab technician in the DRC’s Kasaï Oriental Province who received training on HIV-TB co-infection.Photo credit: MSH staff.

People living with HIV or tuberculosis (TB) face many health challenges, but when infected with both of these diseases, their struggles multiply, because each disease accelerates the other’s progression. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is ranked eighth among countries reporting the highest rates of HIV/TB co-infection. To manage the burden of care at such a level, countries must have well-trained staff in a health system that takes an integrated approach to care and treatment.

 {Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.}A health worker in Namibia using the Electronic Dispensing Tool (EDT).Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.

When a pharmaceutical information management tool was adopted in Namibia, not only did its functionality improve health service delivery, but it also eased the burden on healthcare workers. Although HIV incidence is dropping, roughly 13 percent of adults in Namibia were infected with HIV in 2012. In some areas of the country, however, prevalence is much higher. In the Oshana region, about 28 percent of adults were living with HIV in 2010.

 {Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.}Dorothy Onyango, founder and executive director of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK), talks with MSH about WOFAK, her role as a leader and mentor, and how women are contributing to moving towards an AIDS-free generation.Photo credit: Elizabeth Walsh/MSH.

In Kenya, civil society organizations are on the frontline of health service delivery at the community level. At least 50 percent of healthcare services to communities in Kenya are provided through the nongovernmental sector, which is made up primarily of civil society organizations.

 {Photo credit: STAR-E staff/MSH}Lydia attends to a patient at Busia Health Center.Photo credit: STAR-E staff/MSH

Ms. Lydia Nakalyango is the only midwife on staff during the day at the Maternal and Child Health Department of Busia Health Center IV, which serves not just their own municipality, but clients from neighboring Kenya as well. Lydia takes care of antenatal clients while also paying attention to the labor ward for any mothers delivering. She is also on standby to care for new babies referred for early infant diagnosis.

 {Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.}After being widowed in 2008, CUBS helped Bridget Egesi start a pharmacy so she could earn an income to suport her five children.Photo credit: Francis Duru/MSH.

Forty-year-old Bridget Egesi has been the sole caretaker of her five children since her husband’s death in 2008. Until recently, Bridget pieced together an income by washing laundry, cleaning her neighbors’ cars, and working as a security guard.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Religious leaders privately counsel HIV patients outside Teklehaimanot Monastery.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

When Berhe Menaso’s wife passed away seven years back, he was faced with the challenge of raising their eight children by himself. But he was sick and too weak to work on his small farm at the time, and his youngest daughter, then only 3 years old, was also very sick. So one early morning he woke his daughter and they went together to the hospital for a checkup. They learned that they were both HIV positive. Based on the advice given to him at the health center, he then brought his seven older children to the hospital for HIV testing and found that they were all HIV negative.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Dr. Rafida, a pharmacist at Coast Provincial General Hospital, enters patient information into the ADT pharmacy management software.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

“My wife was the first to discover her status. After giving birth, she started feeling unwell and […] tested positive for HIV,” says Mzee Ahmed*, who later learned his son, Juma, was also HIV positive. “After learning my wife’s status, it took me awhile to get tested but I eventually got the courage to get tested. The test was positive and I was also put on antiretroviral treatment,” explains Ahmed. Six years later, they all remain on their antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimens and visit health facilities regularly to refill their ARV prescriptions.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Teberih Tsegay, Almaz Haile, Jember Alemayehu, and Yeshi Derebew, of Korem Town, Ethiopia.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

"Some years back there was no one to teach us, so we gave birth to HIV-positive children. But now we can teach others so no child will be born with the virus," says Jember, a mother mentor at Korem Health Center in Tigray, Ethiopia. Four HIV-positive women, Teberih Tsegay, Almaz Haile, Jember Alemayehu, and Yeshi Derebew, envisioning that no child be born with HIV in their town, started to work as mother mentors at Korem Health Center to achieve their vision.

 {Photo credit: John Rae / The Global Fund}Martin Kopp and Catherine ServoPhoto credit: John Rae / The Global Fund

A grant management dashboard for use by implementers of grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund)—slated for pilot testing in six countries beginning in February 2014—is being codesigned and  codeveloped by Grant Management Solutions (GMS), SAP AG (Germany) and the Global Fund. GMS is a project funded through a contract between the U.S. Agency for International Development and Management Sciences for Health, who leads the project along with 25 partners. 

Pages

Printer Friendly Version