HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

{Photo credit: PFSCM.}Photo credit: PFSCM.

Since 2006, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been working with Guyana’s Ministry of Health to strengthen the supply chain responsible for delivering life-saving medicines. An integral part of Guyana’s Ministry of Health, the Materials Management Unit (MMU), is responsible for managing, storing, and distributing drugs and health commodities to the country’s public health facilities.

Dr. Andrew Nyandigisi from the Malaria Control Unit discusses lessons learned in the implementation of DHIS2 with workshop participants. {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

An effective reporting system for health commodities is critical to ensure accountability, enable informed decision making, and provide timely access to information. Using DHIS2 to Manage Data for Malaria Commodities

{Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.}Photo credit: Jessica Charles/MSH, Nigeria.

In Nigeria, 17.5 million children are orphans or vulnerable children; 2.5 million of these children are AIDS orphans. Although it is customary in Nigeria for extended family and community members to care for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC), the capacity and resources of these individuals and households have been overextended by the growing number of OVC and the complexity of their needs. "For me, it’s about saving a generation from HIV, and that’s exactly what we’ve been doing," says Obialunamma ("Oby") Onoh, associate director for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of the Community-Based Support for Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Nigeria (CUBS) project. Funded by PEPFAR through USAID and led by MSH, the CUBS Project has provided care and support to children orphaned by AIDS and vulnerable children in 11 of Nigeria’s 36 states.

 {Photo credit: Annette Scheckler/MSH.}Pharmacist Bethlehem Nega counsels a patient.Photo credit: Annette Scheckler/MSH.

Updated January 30, 2015 A Phone Call for Health Alongside a road in a remote area of the Amhara Region, Solomon Dawit*, a truck driver from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, sits waiting for a ride to the nearest town. He has two big problems: his truck has broken down and he doesn’t know how long it would take to get the parts needed to fix it. Another problem?  He is running out of his lifesaving antiretroviral (ARV) medication. After one month of waiting, Dawit’s truck is fixed, and he heads back home to Addis Ababa.

{Photo credit: BLC staff/MSH.}Photo credit: BLC staff/MSH.

“You are stronger than this disease,” Ana’s sister reminds her. Ana Paz is a 35-year-old community health worker for Mwenho, a civil society organization in Angola. She works at Centro de Salúde de Alegria, a public health facility in the capital city, Luanda. Her day is busy, providing HIV counseling and testing (HCT), basic medication, and support to people living with HIV.

 {Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.}Merigeta says he is "now alive and healthy" thanks to the teaching of a religious leader trained by ENHAT-CS.Photo credit: Genaye Eshetu/MSH.

“I was angry at life! I was too weak to work; I couldn’t even feed myself. When I took my [antiretroviral] medicine on an empty stomach, it gave me stomach pains. So I decided to quit the medicine and instead go to a monastery and use holy water,” says Merigeta.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Staff at the new HTC site in Bvumbwe Prison test an inmate for HIV.Photo credit: MSH

In 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated a program designed to improve the quality, access, and coverage of health services related to HIV in seven districts of Malawi. The Service Delivery Quality Improvement and Health Systems Strengthening project, led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH), works with local stakeholders to this end, including improving HIV prevention and care at prisons in these seven districts.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, DRC.

A project of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) is led by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH). The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) established a local field office in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in early 2013. As one of the most recent additions to the SCMS global portfolio of countries, the local staff of five has sought to scale up and produce results extremely quickly. SCMS’ primary mandate in the DRC is to supply the HIV commodities needed by six PEPFAR implementing partners that are spread across four of the DRC’s eleven provinces. These six implementing partners provide care to some of the most at-need populations within the DRC. They have set ambitious treatment targets and depend on SCMS to deliver the commodities that will allow them to meet those needs. The commodities supplied by SCMS range from antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to antibiotics needed to treat opportunistic infections, lab equipment, supplies and test kits. This year, 22,514 Congolese people will receive treatment with ARVs supplied by SCMS.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

For more than eight years, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been saving lives through stronger supply chains. Funded by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), SCMS is supporting rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS programs, creating a reliable global supply chain where none existed, leveraging economies of scale to reduce costs, and serving as an emergency provider of choice for AIDS programs. SCMS is managed by the non-profit Partnership for Supply Chain Management (PFSCM)—a partnership of John Snow, Inc. (JSI), and Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

 {Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH}SIAPS West Africa Regional Program launches, April 2014.Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH

Antiretroviral (ARV) medicines are a matter of life or death for people who are HIV-positive.  In West Africa, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) is working to make sure people have uninterrupted access to these life-saving medicines.

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