HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: Warren Zelman}Photo Credit: Warren Zelman

Each year, nearly 300,000 women die from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Approximately 7.6 million children do not live to see their fifth birthday. Most of the major direct causes of maternal and child mortality are preventable. MSH's maternal and child health interventions begin before pregnancy, with integrated family planning and HIV services, and continue through the life of the child.

 {Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire}Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store unloading supplies at the docking station.Photo credit: SCMS/Côte d’Ivoire

The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) has been providing technical assistance since 2005 to Côte d’Ivoire’s central medical store, the Pharmacie de la Sante Publique (PSP)—later re-named the Nouvelle PSP (NPSP)—to strengthen the management of products in the health system. SCMS is a project under the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) administered by the US Agency for International Development (USAID).

 {Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH}Representatives from the German Enterprise for International Cooperation (GIZ) facilitating a communications workshop with the Ukrainian Center for Socially Dangerous Disease Control, in partnership with LMG-Ukraine.Photo credit: Alisher Latypov/MSH

In November 2013, Ukrainians took to the streets in Kyiv, claiming Maidan Square to protest corruption and to demand the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement, rejected by the now ex-Ukrainian President Yanukovich.  By the beginning of 2014, the situation reached a boiling point and the riots in Kyiv were turning into full-blown urban warfare.

 {Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators}Jemila Hussein, shown here with her vegetable business; is no longer hiding from her HIV diagnosis.Photo courtesy: Kenya’s National Organisation of Peer Educators

Jemila Hussein, a 35-year-old widow and mother of six, lives in Namba, Migori Sub County, Kenya. In August 2008, Hussein’s life took a downturn when she tested positive for HIV. Deeply ashamed and fearing the stigma and discrimination associated with HIV, she isolated herself from her community. Her husband’s death had significantly reduced the family income, and Hussein worried about her children’s basic needs and education. She was convinced that she would die and leave them orphaned.

 {Photo credit: MSH}Meleakeselam Kahilayu at Teklehaimanot monastery, South Tigray, Ethiopia.Photo credit: MSH

Melakeselam Kalayu is a religious leader who has been conducting baptisms for 15 years at Teklehaimanot Monastery in southern Tigray, Ethiopia. Throughout this time, Kalayu had prohibited people from taking any medications while using holy water at the monastery. Among the thousands of visitors to the monastery every day, many are people living with HIV (PLHIV). In response to Kalayu's teaching, many stopped their antiretroviral therapy (ART) while using holy water at the monastery.

 {Photo credit: SCMS}SCMS staff provides technical assistance to head of pharmacy at Hôpital Bernard Mevs in Haiti.Photo credit: SCMS

Hôpital Bernard Mevs is one of 177 sites where the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), a US President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-funded project, delivers lifesaving HIV & AIDS drugs and commodities in Haiti. On any given day, dozens of the more than 1,070 patients currently on antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the hospital wait outside the pharmacy’s door where Rose-Marie Marcelin dispenses their monthly supply of medication.

 {Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.}SCMS leads a national quantification exercise to ensure the availability of lifesaving drugs for nearly 55,000 HIV & AIDS patients.Photo credit: Jean-Jacques Augustin.

An estimated 141,000 people live with HIV in Haiti. In support of the Ministry of Public Health and the Population (MSPP)’s continued effort to improve the lives of people living with the virus, the US Government, through the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), collaborates with the National AIDS Program to achieve its objective of having at least 90 percent of the eligible population on antiretroviral treatment (ART) by September 2015.

The four-year Ethiopia Network for HIV/AIDS Treatment, Care, and Support (ENHAT-CS) project held its end-of-project conference in December in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and announced its notable achievements in the two regions where it operated – Amhara and Tigray.

 Screenshot of SIAPS West Africa Regional Project dashboard shows national stock status in Niger; three products in blue have more than 100 months in stock.

Alerts of stock-outs of life-saving medicines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and treating opportunistic infections have emerged from a number of countries in West Africa. Several root causes of stock-outs have been identified such as poor coordination and information sharing among partners.

 {Photo credit: Ruth Omondi/MSH.}Two women beneficiares of the integrated HIV and MNCH program at the Mbeere District Hospital.Photo credit: Ruth Omondi/MSH.

Mbeere District Hospital, following USAID-funded LMS/Kenya support, increases the number of HIV-positive mothers delivering healthy babies According to the Ministry of Health, 13,000 babies in Kenya are born HIV-positive each year, despite availability of proven methods to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus. One of these is integrating HIV care and treatment into maternal and child health services. In 2013, Mbeere District Hospital in Embu County decided to take this approach to reduce the number of children born with HIV in their facility. 

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