HIV & AIDS: Our Impact

{Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH}Photo Credit: Tadeo Atuhura/MSH

How US Foreign Assistance is Making A Difference Uganda has made great progress in controlling the HIV epidemic and increasing access to critical HIV and health services in recent years. Under the Government of Uganda’s leadership and with the support of development partners, such as MSH, Uganda has reached the second of UNAIDS global 90-90-90 goals: 90% of people living with HIV who know their status are on treatment. 

Erik Schouten

In 2011, Malawi implemented an ambitious and pioneering “test-and-treat” HIV strategy for pregnant and breastfeeding women, known as Option B+. Erik Schouten, MSH's Country Lead and Project Director of  the District Health System Strengthening and Quality Improvement for Service Delivery Project in Malawi, supported the roll-out of the program.

 {Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia}ART Pharmacy in Oshikuku District Hospital, Omusati Region, Namibia.Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia

In a major advance against the spread of HIV, Namibia has approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection.

 {Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo, MSH}Representative of the Hon. Minister of Health, Mr. Arioye Segilola (right), and Dr. Zipporah Kpamor, Country Representative for MSH with other dignitaries displaying the unveiled 2016 National Guidelines on HIV/AIDS in Kaduna State, Nigeria.Photo credit: Aor Ikyaabo, MSH

On June 20, 2017, the National AIDS and STIs Control Programme of the Federal Ministry of Health in collaboration with Management Sciences for Health (MSH) hosted the launch of the North-West Zonal Dissemination of the 2016 National Guidelines for HIV Prevention Treatment and Care, in Kaduna State, Nigeria.

 {Okechukwu Onyezue/MSH}Karimu Muazu and her groundnut oil businessOkechukwu Onyezue/MSH

Despite decades of progress and efforts made to improve the status of women and children in Nigeria, inequality and poverty persist. In many households in northern Nigeria, women are the caregivers. However, without a steady source of income, they can barely provide for their families. An orphans and vulnerable children program, organized by the USAID-funded Prevention Organizational Systems AIDS Care and Treatment (Pro-ACT) project, implemented by MSH, provides integrated services to such vulnerable households, including HIV-infected and affected households.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff}Kasifa Mugala, 34, started feeling ill while she was pregnant, and started ART after referral for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. “I am very happy. I gave birth to a healthy baby who is now turning one year old,” she said. “I did not know that I would ever be fine. I am grateful to our village health team.”Photo credit: MSH staff

Esther Nyende, 45, is a member of her village health team and a community leader in Uganda’s eastern Pallisa District. Nyende alone has referred 20 clients who are now receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART).

 {Photo credit: Amref Health Africa}Mary Gonera, midwife, led the Mucheke Community Health Center team that improved health service delivery and MNCH indicators in their community in Masvingo, Zimbabwe.Photo credit: Amref Health Africa

Many discussions on incorporating technology in the health field revolve around flashy mHealth tools which improve overall health information systems. Yet smaller scale use of mobile technology can be just as effective in supporting health workers in developing countries to overcome day-to-day challenges and effectively deliver health services, especially in rural communities.

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

HIV testing and counseling is central to HIV and AIDS prevention and control as well as improving the quality of patients’ lives. Individuals learn their HIV status and receive personalized risk-reduction counseling to help prevent acquiring or further transmitting of HIV while those found positive are enrolled for support, care, and treatment. Until 2014, only 46 percent of inpatients at Msambweni Sub-County Hospital in Kwale County were tested for HIV. This changed in 2015 when a team from the hospital set out to increase the number of inpatients tested for HIV.

 {Photo: SIAPS Namibia, September 2015}Martin Mandumbwa, PA, dispensing medicines to a patient at Robert Mugabe Clinic in Windhoek, Namibia.Photo: SIAPS Namibia, September 2015

Namibia faces a high burden of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with an estimated 13.1 percent of the adult population living with HIV. To help address this critical national health concern, the Namibian Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) has been receiving technical assistance from the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program, with funding from the US President’s Emergency Fund for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), through US Agency for International Development (USAID), and led by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

{Photo credit: MSH staff}Photo credit: MSH staff

The average Ugandan woman gives birth to 6.2 children—a national fertility rate that is among the five highest in sub-Saharan Africa—increasing the chances of complicated pregnancies and deliveries. If all unmet need for modern contraceptive methods in Uganda were satisfied, it is estimated that maternal mortality would drop by 40 percent, and unplanned births and induced abortions would decline by about 85 percent. 

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