Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

The trained medicine dispenser/proprietor signs paperwork to receive the official AMS logo for her store. {Photo credit: Arthur Loryoun/MSH Liberia}Photo credit: Arthur Loryoun/MSH Liberia

The Liberia Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Liberia Medicine and Health Products Regulatory Authority (LMHRA) and the Pharmacy Board of Liberia (PBL) marked the successful launch of the Accredited Medicine Store (AMS) program in Liberia on February 12, 2013. The Sustainable Drug Seller Initiatives (SDSI) program supports the AMS initiative in Liberia through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Management Sciences for Health (MSH). 

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)

A supervisor from the National Malaria Control Program explains the emergency distribution and the new reporting system to the chiefs of health centers in a district of Conakry. (Photo: MSH/SIAPS Guinea)In Guinea, malaria is a common threat year-round, especially during the rainy season that lasts from May to October. It affects everyone, but for children under five years of age, appropriate and immediate treatment could mean the difference between life and death.

Mr. Sello Lechesa, a pharmacy technician and RxSolution user in the ART pharmacy at Maluti Adventist Hospital. {Photo credit: MSH staff/Lesotho}Photo credit: MSH staff/Lesotho

Lesotho’s pharmaceutical sector faced two formidable challenges: the unreliable supply of essential medicines and the unknown quality of medicines circulating in the country. Inefficiencies within the supply chain system were at the root of both problems, specifically weak information management systems that did not support decision-making in the supply chain.

Baby Victor and his mother. {Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya}Photo credit: Y. Otieno, MSH/Kenya

Around 11 in the morning, mothers start streaming into the health facility. Baby Victor’s mother has brought him today for a routine immunization, but she’s also concerned about his lack of appetite and high fever. The nurses recommend that one-year-old Victor be tested for malaria.Thanks to a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit, Victor’s test results come back in just half an hour.

Dihlabeng Hospital pharmacy personnel and MSH South Africa staff accepting the Centre for Public Sector Innovation award: (bottom L-R) Mrs. A. Marais, Mr. J-P. Sallet, (top L-R) Mrs. M. Khulu, Mr. M. Zuma, Mr. R. Nelson, and Mr. D. Putzier.

Malaria continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries, especially in Sub Saharan Africa. In Kenya, malaria alone accounts for 30% of outpatient admittance and up to 5% of inpatient deaths while 170 million working days are lost annually because of it.In 2004, Kenya changed its malaria treatment policy opting for the use of artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) as first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria.

Leading child health agencies have joined forces to announce plans to work together on an unprecedented scale to increase access to amoxicillin in dispersible tablet form – the recommended antibiotic treatment for children under five suffering from pneumonia. Download

Please join MSH and partners during these featured events at the 43rd Union World Conference on Lung Health.Follow the conference on Twitter @MSHHealthImpact with hashtag #Kuala2012.Health Systems Innovation through Pharmaceutical ManagementWorkshop 03: Transition to Sustainable Pharmaceutical Management Systems for TBWednesday, 14 November | 09:00–17:00 | Room 407Organized by MSH and the Global Drug Facility (GDF)MSH and the GDF will share experiences and strategies for improving systems and ensuring sustainability and quality of TB pharmaceutical services delivery.

Dr. Douglas Keene. {Photo credit: MSH.}Photo credit: MSH.

Modern medicines, vaccines, and other pharmaceutical products have revolutionized health care, yet budget constraints and poor infrastructure prevent many people in developing countries from accessing even the most basic treatments. Millions die each year from diseases that could have been prevented or treated with modern pharmaceuticals.

Homa Bay TB team, MSF, and SIAPS collaboration. (Photo credit: MSH)Successful treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is one of the key indicators of a TB Control Program’s performance and essential to containing the emergence of anti-TB drug resistance. Multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) treatment requires medicines that are expensive, involve longer treatment regimens, are toxic, and can cause patients to have severe side effects.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version