Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

MSH's Global Technical Lead for HIV and AIDS, Scott Kellerman, has co-edited a 12-paper special supplement on pediatric HIV and AIDS for the journal AIDS. Dr. Nandita Sugandhi from CHAI and Dr. Rami Yogev from Northwestern University Department of Pediatrics were also co-editors. The series was initiated last year because of concerns that key issues in pediatric HIV and AIDS were being overlooked, such as case findings for children missed by PMTCT; linkage, retention and adherence to care for infected children; and the growing cohort of HIV-exposed and uninfected children.

{Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH}Photo credit: Rachel Hassinger/MSH

MSH spoke with Sandra Guerrier, Ph, MSc, project director for the USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Sustainability Project in Haiti (LMS Haiti)—one of four MSH projects in the country. Tell us about LMS and MSH’s presence in Haiti.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH}Dr. John Chimumbwa, Health Commodities and Services Management (HCSM) program Chief of Party, speaks at the launch.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH

Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) unveiled a new drug formulary, the first of its kind in Kenya, on September 6, 2013. The formulary consists of a list of all drugs used at KNH and guidelines on prescribing, dispensing, and providing medicine information to patients. 

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.}Photo credit: Warren Zelman, Ethiopia.

HIV and AIDS patients worldwide depend on lifesaving drugs to extend their lives and improve their quality of life. In Ethiopia, where an estimated 2.2 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, access to these lifesaving medicines, particularly for people living outside of the capital city, means depending on an efficient and effective pharmaceutical supply chain to get the medicines to keep them alive.

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Management Sciences for Health—with financial support from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USAID and other partners—has been working in Tanzania on scaling up the Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDO) Program since 2002, in support of the Government of Tanzania's efforts to improve access to essential medicines and pharmaceutical services.

 {Photo credit: Rui Pires}Accredited drug shop (ADS) in Uganda.Photo credit: Rui Pires

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly one-third of the developing world population lacks regular access to quality essential medicines. In rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa, most people first turn to community drug shops for their medicines; yet these shops may not be legally licensed, have trained staff, or sell quality-assured medicines. Committed to Expanding Access to Quality Essential Medicines 

{Photo credit: MSH}Photo credit: MSH

Throughout Côte d'Ivoire, more than 110,000 HIV & AIDS patients receive anti-retroviral drugs. These patients rely on a smoothly functioning supply chain that allows medicines to reach local health centers in a timely manner. When recent assessments identified that many sites within the country were not receiving drugs as scheduled, the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS), managed by Management Sciences for Health in Côte d'Ivoire, began identifying challenges and mobilizing solutions.

 {Photo credit: Jiro Ose, SCMS}An Ethiopian warehouse after support from SCMS, USAID and PEPFAR.Photo credit: Jiro Ose, SCMS

The Ethiopian government is undertaking a bold initiative to ensure that medicinal supply and access are available throughout the country. A major challenge is reaching a population whose majority lives in rural areas. Through a series of centralized and regional hubs, this initiative aims to serve thousands of health centers all over the country and overcome the hurdle to reaching patients. Achieving this aim is a complex undertaking, which is becoming increasingly more so as the diversity and volume of medicines regularly expands.

{Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno}Photo credit: MSH/Yvonne Otieno

“Medicine can be poisonous if it is contaminated. It can poison my clients, who will keep returning to the facility. To prevent contamination of the medicines we receive, our facility has invested in proper storage facilities,” says Mr. Andrew Mabele, a clinical officer responsible for screening outpatients, reviewing lab results, and providing HIV and tuberculosis patient follow-up treatment in the Kabichbich Health Centre.

The manager of a community health center dispenses family planning commodities in Mali. {Photo credit: MSH.}

By Dr. Constance Toure, Dr. Suzanne Diarra, Dr. Modibo Diarra, Dr. Yssouf Diallo Access to family planning methods has been challenging in many parts of Mali – even before the US had to shut off direct aid to the Malian government. With funding from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program, has been supporting Mali’s Ministry of Health through its Direction de la Pharmacie et des Médicaments (DPM) to estimate contraceptive needs.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version