Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

 {Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH}SIAPS West Africa Regional Program launches, April 2014.Photo credit: Francis Aboagye-Nyame/MSH

Antiretroviral (ARV) medicines are a matter of life or death for people who are HIV-positive.  In West Africa, the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) is working to make sure people have uninterrupted access to these life-saving medicines.

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

For over a decade, the Government of Ethiopia has been working to improve tuberculosis (TB) screening and has been greatly successful in increasing case detection. Unfortunately, as is too often the case, solving one problem created another: the nation now struggles to maintain an adequate supply of medicine to treat the newly diagnosed patients. Health facilities experience frequent stock outs of anti-TB medications, leaving many patients without treatment for weeks and even months.

 {Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.}A health worker in Namibia using the Electronic Dispensing Tool (EDT).Photo credit: SIAPS Namibia staff/MSH.

When a pharmaceutical information management tool was adopted in Namibia, not only did its functionality improve health service delivery, but it also eased the burden on healthcare workers. Although HIV incidence is dropping, roughly 13 percent of adults in Namibia were infected with HIV in 2012. In some areas of the country, however, prevalence is much higher. In the Oshana region, about 28 percent of adults were living with HIV in 2010.

 {Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.}Dr. Rafida, a pharmacist at Coast Provincial General Hospital, enters patient information into the ADT pharmacy management software.Photo credit: Yvonne Otieno/MSH.

“My wife was the first to discover her status. After giving birth, she started feeling unwell and […] tested positive for HIV,” says Mzee Ahmed*, who later learned his son, Juma, was also HIV positive. “After learning my wife’s status, it took me awhile to get tested but I eventually got the courage to get tested. The test was positive and I was also put on antiretroviral treatment,” explains Ahmed. Six years later, they all remain on their antiretroviral (ARV) drug regimens and visit health facilities regularly to refill their ARV prescriptions.

 {Photo credit: MSH staff.}Nurse Odila Jeune Gens is responsible for family planning services at the Dity health center.Photo credit: MSH staff.

Located in the remote highlands of Haiti’s northwest region of Port-de-Paix, the Dity health center has not always been able to provide adequate family planning services to women in the 21 surrounding communities, despite the obvious need. Maternal and infant mortality is high in the region due to the high number of births, short intervals between pregnancies, and the lack of skilled birth attendants.

 {Photo credit: Doris Bota / MSH.}Edison Kiprono Chepkonga, a medical laboratory technologist, is championing standards in health care at the district hospital.Photo credit: Doris Bota / MSH.

“Nothing lifts your heart more than giving your support and time to a good cause.” These were the words of Edison Kiprono Chepkonga, a medical laboratory technologist working at Kapsabet District hospital, situated in Nandi County (Rift Valley region), Kenya.  Edison is one of the 26 laboratory personnel that benefited from a biosafety training supported by the PEPFAR/CDC-funded Strengthening Public Health Laboratory Systems (SPHLS), led by MSH. The hospital has a bed capacity of 137. Thirty-seven satellite health facilities refer laboratory samples to the hospital.

{Photo credit: MSH staff/ SIAPS Ethiopia.}Photo credit: MSH staff/ SIAPS Ethiopia.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Increasing Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) Program has partnered with the Government of Ethiopia to bring a 100-year-old pharmaceutical management system into the 21st century. The Auditable Pharmacy Transactions and Services (APTS) is a package of data-driven interventions that ultimately result in a continuous supply of essential medicines, optimal budget utilization, and improved pharmacy services.

{Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.}Photo credit: MSH staff/SIAPS Burundi.

Malaria is the leading cause of death for adults and children under five in Burundi. One hundred percent of the population in Burundi is at risk of contracting malaria. Despite the efforts of Burundi’s Ministry of Health (MoH), timely access to health care is limited by financial constraints, geographic inaccessibility, and lack of awareness about malaria complications. Community Case Management

{Photo credit: SCMS}Photo credit: SCMS

The Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) case story, “Saving Lives Through Stronger Supply Chains” (PDF), was selected as one of the top five winners of the Procurement for Complex Situations Challenge. The Challenge aims at collecting and disseminating practical experiences with lessons of failure or success from designing and implementing procurement in complex situations. Case stories will be used to empower procurement practitioners with solutions and tools to improve procurement performance in complex situations, fostering the science of delivery.

Figure 1: Percentage of diarrhea cases that are appropriately treated

The MSH-led, USAID-funded Securing Ugandans’ Right to Essential Medicines (SURE) program registered significant improvements in rational prescriptions for diarrhea and cough after introducing on-the-job training to health workers. The training, which is a component of SURE’s supervision, performance assessment, and recognition strategy, was introduced in collaboration with the Ministry of Health to improve medicines availability, storage, and appropriate use.

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