Pharmaceutical Management: Our Impact

 {<a href="http://siapsprogram.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Guatemala_CV_Afiche_FINAL_R1.pdf">USAID SIAPS</a>}Identifying, Treating, and Preventing Malaria: a poster for community volunteersUSAID SIAPS

In Guatemala, a network of community volunteers who diagnose and treat malaria in their communities are mainstays of the Ministry of Health’s malaria strategy to ensure timely access to appropriate treatment, a key strategy to eliminate malaria. However, an assessment identified weaknesses in the volunteers’ management of antimalarials and diagnostic supplies.

{Photo: MSH staff}Photo: MSH staff

For the first time in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), 13 life-saving health commodities for mothers and children have been included in the National Health Development Plan (NHDP). These medicines are recommended by the United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children (UNCoLSC).

{Photo Credit: MSH Staff}Photo Credit: MSH Staff

Management Sciences for Health has been working closely in collaboration with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development (TB Alliance) on the introduction of the new dispersible pediatric fixed-dose combination. Through MSH’s projects across identified high-burden countries, we have been providing assistance on updating treatment guidelines and essential medicines lists, registration of the reformulated product, financing and reprogramming grants, quantification, and training healthcare providers on the medicine and its use. 

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

Kwesi Eghan Kwesi Eghan, MSC, MBA, BPHARM, is portfolio manager for the US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program in South Sudan and Afghanistan. A pharmacist by training, Eghan co-authored MSH’s recently published Management of Medicines Benefit Programs in Low-and Middle-Income Settings, which is designed as a manual for countries to implement health benefit packages that reduce out-of-pocket expenses for medicines in the context of universal health coverage (UHC).

A new SIAPS tool for health commodities management in Mali

In Mali, major weaknesses in the pharmaceutical sector include lack of availability of regular, reliable pharmaceutical management information for decision-making and an inadequate and fragmented logistics system that fails to take the community level into account when planning for inventory management. As a result, stock-outs of lifesaving commodities are frequent at all health service delivery points.

 {Photo credit: SIAPS Mozambique}Ministry of Health staff in Mozambique learn how to use Pharmadex for medicines registration management.Photo credit: SIAPS Mozambique

This story originally appeared on the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services (SIAPS) program website. SIAPS is funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH).

{Photo credit: Mark Tuschman}Photo credit: Mark Tuschman

HIV testing and counseling is central to HIV and AIDS prevention and control as well as improving the quality of patients’ lives. Individuals learn their HIV status and receive personalized risk-reduction counseling to help prevent acquiring or further transmitting of HIV while those found positive are enrolled for support, care, and treatment. Until 2014, only 46 percent of inpatients at Msambweni Sub-County Hospital in Kwale County were tested for HIV. This changed in 2015 when a team from the hospital set out to increase the number of inpatients tested for HIV.

 {Photo: SIAPS South Africa}The biometric scanner recognizes a patient’s fingerprint at a Tshwane clinic.Photo: SIAPS South Africa

By Bright Phiri, Katelyn Payne, Sifiso Mahlaba, and Jean-Pierre Sallet Enhancing patient recordkeeping in Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

{Photo credit: Warren Zelman}Photo credit: Warren Zelman

An integrated approach to monitoring the safety of medicines that includes both active surveillance and spontaneous reporting is essential to a well-functioning pharmaceutical sector. Active surveillance is particularly important to support the introduction of new essential medicines in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where regulatory systems are often still developing and need support.

{Doctors visit patients in Rabia Balkhi hospital, Kabul Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Afghan Eyes/Jawad Jalali)} Doctors visit patients in Rabia Balkhi hospital, Kabul Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Afghan Eyes/Jawad Jalali)

Since 2003, with the support of international donors (namely the US Agency for International Development [USAID], World Bank, and European Union), Afghanistan’s Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) has worked with NGOs to implement two key health packages: the Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS), covering primary care services, and the Essential Package of Hospital Services (EPHS), covering secondary care needs. The implementing NGOs have produced internal pharmaceutical logistics reports for the commodities they deliver to their catchment provinces.

Pages

Printer Friendly Version